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I will be off tomorrow and Monday is a holiday. See you back here on Tuesday. -mam

August 28 Thursday's News

 

LaCie unveils 48TB Thunderbolt 2 drive, Dropbox upgrades Pro plans to 1TB

LaCie unveils 48TB Thunderbolt 2 drive, Dropbox upgrades Pro plans to 1TB

Apple users gained two additional high-capacity storage options on Wednesday, as external drive maker LaCie showed off its new rack-mount Thunderbolt 2 drive in a 48 terabyte configuration and cloud storage firm Dropbox announced that its $9.99-per-month Pro plan will now include 1 terabyte of space. -- AppleInsider.

Feds warn first responders of dangerous hacking tool: Google Search

Feds warn first responders of dangerous hacking tool: Google Search

In a restricted intelligence document distributed to police, public safety, and security organizations in July, the Department of Homeland Security warned of a "malicious activity" that could expose secrets and security vulnerabilities in organizations' information systems. The name of that activity: "Google dorking." -- Ars Technica.

One apartment's Wi-Fi dead zones, mapped with a physics equation

One apartment's Wi-Fi dead zones, mapped with a physics equation

A home's Wi-Fi dead zones are, to most of us, a problem solved with guesswork. Your laptop streams just fine in this corner of the bedroom, but not the adjacent one; this arm of the couch is great for uploading photos, but not the other one. You avoid these places, and where the Wi-Fi works becomes a factor in the wear patterns of your home. In an effort to better understand, and possibly eradicate, his Wi-Fi dead zones, one man took the hard way: he solved the Helmholtz equation. -- Ars Technica.

Apparel is next

Apparel is next

If software can be injected into an industry's product it will bend to the will of the software writers.

This theory expands on Marc Andreessen's observation that "software is eating the world". The evidence is that software, coupled with microprocessors, sensors, batteries and networking becomes applicable to an increasingly larger set of problems to be solved[1]. Software has "eaten" large portions of entertainment (e.g. Pixar, iTunes, video games), telecommunications (iPhone, Android, Messaging), various professions including journalism, management and law, and is entering transportation, energy and health care and poised over banking, finance and government. -- Asymco.

iOS 7: Closing All Open Safari Windows on Your iPhone or iPad

iOS 7: Closing All Open Safari Windows on Your iPhone or iPad

iOS 7's Private Browsing is handy if you want to secretly shop for gifts or "ahem" view any other sites that you might not want people to see. In this Quick Tip, though, Melissa Holt's going to talk about using this feature as a way to close all of the Safari windows you've got open. -- The Mac Observer.

How Duke Turned an iPod Giveaway into a University-Wide Digital Initiative

How Duke Turned an iPod Giveaway into a University-Wide Digital Initiative

A decade ago, Duke University gave iPods to incoming freshmen. That idea evolved into the Duke Digital Initiative, a way to integrate emerging technology into courses. Kelly looks at how that initiative has grown and changed in the last ten years. -- The Mac Observer.

10.8: Open a specific browser based on the URL

10.8: Open a specific browser based on the URL

Usually I want to open Gmail in Chrome and URLs pointing to my development server in Firefox. For everything else I use Safari.

There is this nifty free app called LinCastor that enables you to register your own handler for an URL. Although it had beed designed to register your own non-standard URL schemes, it can intercept standard http and https as well. -- Mac OS X Hints.

Apple Seeds OS X Mavericks 10.9.5 Build 13F24 to Developers

Apple Seeds OS X Mavericks 10.9.5 Build 13F24 to Developers

Apple today seeded Mavericks 10.9.5 build 13F24 to developers, just over a week after seeding the fourth OS X 10.9.5 beta, build 13F18, and more than a month after releasing OS X 10.9.4 to the public.

It is unclear what improvements the 10.9.5 update will bring to Mavericks, but it is likely to include bug fixes and stability enhancements. Apple is asking developers to focus on USB, USB Smart Cards, Graphics, Safari, Thunderbolt, and Gatekeeper. -- Mac Rumors.

How to hide a hard drive partition on your Mac

How to hide a hard drive partition on your Mac

Generally when you either partition your Mac's boot drive, or attach a secondary drive to your Mac, then provided the partition's formatting is compatible with OS X, you should see it mount and be available in the Finder. However, there may be times when you might wish to keep a partition hidden, either because you do not use it, or because it is not intended to be shown in the first place. -- MacIssues.

Apple Invents an iPhone Dock with Lightning Connector that provides a newly Designed Breaking Strength Feature

Apple Invents an iPhone Dock with Lightning Connector that provides a newly Designed Breaking Strength Feature

On August 28, 2014, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals an improved method of producing a lightning connector that has a newly defined breaking strength. This new feature will be able to protect the receptacle lightning connector and/or the electronic device from damage when a force is applied to the lightning connector. One of Apple's patent figures specifically presents a new docking station utilizing this new feature. -- Patently Apple.

Revolution in Progress: The Networked Economy

Revolution in Progress: The Networked Economy

No question about it: The Networked Economy is the next economic revolution. In the coming years, it will offer unprecedented opportunities for businesses and improve the lives of billions worldwide.

In fact, the revolution is already under way.

"Over the last few decades, we've grown beyond the industrial economy to the IT economy and the Internet economy, each of which led to significant inflection points in growth and prosperity," says Vivek Bapat, SAP's global vice president for portfolio and strategic marketing. "Now we're looking at the Networked Economy." This new economy, resulting from a convergence of the economies that came before it and catalyzed by a new era of hyper-connectivity, is creating spectacular new opportunities for innovation.

And, like any revolution, the Networked Economy is going to be big. Very big. -- MIT Technology Review.

Microsoft Office 2011 14.4.4

Microsoft Office 2011 14.4.4

Microsoft has updated Office 2011 to version 14.4.4, a short but sweet maintenance release that should alleviate a few frustrations. The update improves keyboard language detection in Word to prevent incorrect updates, and adds descriptions for supported account types in Outlook to help you choose correctly when configuring an Office 365 account. It also fixes an issue in PowerPoint that caused slides to display random artifacts when displayed in Presenter View mode on a monitor with a large resolution (such as a 4k monitor). (Free update from the Microsoft Download Center or through Microsoft AutoUpdate, 113 MB, release notes, 10.5+)

Apple exploring double-duty NFC, inductive charging coil for smartwatches, mobile phones

Apple exploring double-duty NFC, inductive charging coil for smartwatches, mobile phones

On the heels of a report suggesting that Apple's long-anticipated "iWatch" could be unveiled within the next two weeks, a new patent application published Thursday by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office shows that the company has continued to contemplate wireless charging solutions for just such a device. -- AppleInsider.

Apple invents an iPhone with Sidewall Displays, an Intelligent Scrolling Feature & Much More

Apple invents an iPhone with Sidewall Displays, an Intelligent Scrolling Feature & Much More

On August 28, 2014, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals an invention regarding flexible displays and more importantly, sidewall displays built into an iDevice like an iPhone. In this report we also link to several other patent applications of interest that includes one for intelligent scrolling on a device such as an iPad that will allow users to scroll through publications both vertically and horizontally. -- Patently Apple.

Replace a Dying iPhone 5 Battery: Take Two

Replace a Dying iPhone 5 Battery: Take Two

I can't remember exactly when my iPhone 5's battery began to fail, which is often the trouble with such things. I do know that, after installing iOS 7, it seemed to die occasionally when hitting the 20--30 percent mark. What I had assumed was a software quirk was not only not fixed in a patch, but grew worse this summer. The battery had gotten so bad that it would even die in the 40 percent range, and sometimes would sporadically drop several percentage points in a few seconds.

After Adam Engst's struggles with replacing his iPhone 5 battery on his own, Josh Centers takes the Apple-approved path, and found that it can be every bit as frustrating. -- TidBITS.

Why old iPhones become sluggish over time

Why old iPhones become sluggish over time

One of the unusual consequences of being in the computer business is that I tend to own more devices than the average person. Therefore, when a family friend recently broke her iPhone 4s, I didn't hesitate to visit the Tabini Museum of Antique Handsets and Tablets in my basement and dig out my old iPhone 4 to lend to her for a few weeks. After all, with a new model all but certain to be announced by mid-September, it would make little sense to purchase a new handset before then.

After restoring the phone and upgrading it to iOS 7, I couldn't help but notice that the user interface felt a little sluggish and that the battery didn't last quite as long as it used to. It wasn't unusable, mind you, but it certainly wasn't quite the lean, mean, mobile machine I remembered. Was Apple trying to tell me something by allowing me to upgrade to an operating system that was too big for my handset's britches? -- Macworld.

How to clean up your News Feed with Facebook for iPhone and iPad

How to clean up your News Feed with Facebook for iPhone and iPad

Have a friend that's particularly vocal on Facebook that you wish you could just hide? Or how about all those groups and pages you joined that now spam your timeline with nonsense that you really don't need to see every day? As luck would have it, there's an easier way to silence them than manually visiting each page, group, or profile. While doing some digging through the settings in the Facebook for iOS app, I found an interesting section that actually lets you clean up your entire News Feed in just a few taps. You just have to know where to look! -- iMore.

Google Maps tracks every single step you take -- here's how to stop it

Google Maps tracks every single step you take -- here's how to stop it

Google Maps has completely changed the way people navigate the world. Without having to pay a dime, users are able to find almost any location on the planet, learn about it, and even navigate to it. Of course, "free" always comes at a price with Google as we have discussed at length in the past, and sometimes Google collects far more data than most people are aware. Google's various services always detail data collection in their terms and conditions, but we all know just about no one actually reads those lengthy jargon-filled disclaimers.

When it comes to Google Maps in particular, you might be shocked at how much private data the app collects -- even while it's not open. -- BGR.

How to Block and Report Spam in Messages on the iPad and iPhone

How to Block and Report Spam in Messages on the iPad and iPhone

Have you received any spam messages on your iPad recently? There have been reports of a handful of spam attacks on iOS users' devices. Wired published an article earlier this month claiming that Apple's Messages app is "being taken over by spammers." It turns out it isn't the apocalypse that Wired made it out to be. However, Messages spam is real. I have not personally experienced the issue as of yet, but I do have friends who have noted the issue to me recently.

While there isn't much we can do on the user end to stop spammers from bombarding our Messages app, we can at least let Apple know it is happening and block the sender from ever being able to bug us (from that particular ID) ever again. -- PadGadget.

How Computer Security Is Like Birth Control (it doesn't always work as planned)

How Computer Security Is Like Birth Control (it doesn't always work as planned)

Hardly a week goes by without a headline on the news about yet another security breach. If it's not the U.S. government, it's a giant retailers. If it's not a bank, it's a company that stores credit card numbers and account information.

The answer to the question, "Is nothing online secure anymore?" reminds me of birth control. It doesn't always work as planned. -- PixoBebo.

Indiana University Researchers Get $1 Million Grant To Study Memes

Indiana University Researchers Get $1 Million Grant To Study Memes

Indiana University is receiving nearly $1 million in federal grant money to investigate the genesis, spread, and demise of Internet memes. The grant from the National Science Foundation awards four Indiana researchers $919,917 to for a project called Truthy that will, as the grant's abstract explains, "explore why some ideas cause viral explosions while others are quickly forgotten." (And yes, in case you're wondering, the name was inspired by Stephen Colbert's neologism "truthiness.") The government-funded research is aimed at identifying which memes are organic and which ones are mere astroturf. "While the vast majority of memes arise in a perfectly organic manner, driven by the complex mechanisms of life on the Web, some are engineered by the shady machinery of high-profile congressional campaigns," Truthy's About page explains. -- DailyDot.

Sorry to have missed you yesterday. Anyone who says there is better living through chemistry, is not telling the truth. -mam

August 27 Wednesday's News

 

Known iOS auto-call feature sparks concerns about unintended dialings

Known iOS auto-call feature sparks concerns about unintended dialings

Technical oversights on the part of some of the iOS ecosystem's most prominent developers -- including Facebook and Google --?could allow attackers to exploit a documented iOS feature that allows apps to initiate phone calls without a prompt, spurring reminders that iPhone owners should be careful what they tap on. -- AppleInsider.

Apple to restrict CloudKit services to latest iOS 8, OS X Yosemite betas ahead of launch

Apple to restrict CloudKit services to latest iOS 8, OS X Yosemite betas ahead of launch

In an email sent out on Monday, Apple informed developers that upcoming iCloud-based features like iCloud Drive, Mail Drop and more will require iOS 8 beta 5 or OS X Yosemite Developer Preview 5 or later to operate. -- AppleInsider.

Apple patent embeds physical iPhone control, feedback components beneath flexible display

Apple patent embeds physical iPhone control, feedback components beneath flexible display

In a new patent discovered on Tuesday, Apple details a flexible mobile device screen that deforms to reveal buttons hidden beneath its surface, accepts sound and pressure input and provides haptic feedback. -- AppleInsider.

Ohio lawmakers want to limit the teaching of the scientific process

Ohio lawmakers want to limit the teaching of the scientific process

Science educators have recognized that teaching science as a large compendium of facts, without reference to the scientific process and theories that bind them together, simply leads to uninterested and uninformed students. So it's a bit mind-boggling to discover that an Ohio state legislator is attempting to block educators from teaching anything about the scientific process. And for good measure, the bill's sponsor threw politics and creationism into the mix. -- Ars Technica.

Why the kill switch law can make iPhone theft obsolete

Why the kill switch law can make iPhone theft obsolete

Governor Jerry Brown signed into law State Sen. Mark Leno's Smartphone Theft Prevention Act (Senate Bill 962). The law will affect any smartphone manufactured on or after July 1, 2015.

There's some reason to hope that the kill switch will do for smartphones what sophisticated alarm systems did for cars: make stealing them less appealing than a pair of leg warmers. Car thefts plummeted 96 percent in New York City when engine immobilizer systems came into play. -- Cult of Mac.

Can't Wait for OS X Yosemite? Disable Mavericks' Dashboard

Can't Wait for OS X Yosemite? Disable Mavericks' Dashboard

OS X Yosemite is coming soon, and it moves the widgets from the Dashboard, which will be no more, to the Notification Center. But if you can't wait to get rid of it in Mavericks, John Martellaro shows how. -- The Mac Observer.

How to share files between user accounts in OS X

How to share files between user accounts in OS X

OS X is designed to isolate users' files from each other, so while you can have multiple user accounts on your Mac, out of convenience you might end up using services like e-mail, Dropbox, sending files through iMessage, or using other online options as a means of transferring files to other user accounts.

Even though these options can be convenient, they do use third-party solutions that are entirely unnecessary, and furthermore are limited in bandwidth (and sometimes have file size limitations) that can hinder instances where you might need to copy large files or large amounts of files to another user on your system. If you need to copy files to another user account, then you can do so using three local services in OS X. -- MacIssues.

Fix iPhone not connecting to AirPort Wi-Fi networks

Fix iPhone not connecting to AirPort Wi-Fi networks

While there are many reasons why an iPhone will not connect to an AirPort base station or other Wi-Fi network, one may simply be an odd configuration of the AirPort's password in the iPhone's settings, but sometimes you might check or re-check your password and even though it is entered correctly, it may still give you errors and not connect. -- MacIssues.

Apple Wins a Patent for an e-Clapperboard for TV & Film Industry

Apple Wins a Patent for an e-Clapperboard for TV & Film Industry

On August 26, 2014, The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 57 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a granted patent that covers Apple's work on an e-clapperboard for the TV and Film industry. Jeff Roenning, a 13 year veteran engineer at Apple was once an assistant editor at Motion Picture Editors Guild. This granted patent was obviously inspired by his experience in that field. Although originally designed to work with an iPhone, the iPad is a much better fit for this type of work. -- Patently Apple.

Apple has been Granted Two New Liquid Metal Patents

Apple has been Granted Two New Liquid Metal Patents

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 57 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we briefly cover two of Apple's latest patent wins related to liquid metal that could one day be used for future Apple devices or parts of devices relating to displays including a TV, the iWatch, iPad, Apple TV, iPod, keyboard, MacBook Pro and beyond. Although both patents are highly technical, I'm sure that there are those who will still want to investigate these patents in depth. -- Patently Apple.

Apple was Granted 57 Patents Today Covering a Future Shopping App, Multitouch, lots of Design Patents and More

Apple was Granted 57 Patents Today Covering a Future Shopping App, Multitouch, lots of Design Patents and More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 57 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we mainly cover Apple's possible future shopping app and briefly touch on a revised multitouch patent. We also cover several new design patents issued to Apple today. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

BBEdit 10.5.12 and TextWrangler 4.5.10

BBEdit 10.5.12 and TextWrangler 4.5.10

Bare Bones Software has released BBEdit 10.5.12 and TextWrangler 4.5.10 with but a single change added to the two text editors -- implementation of new code signing procedures that will ensure compatibility with "future releases of OS X" (in particular, the upcoming OS X Yosemite). If you're running the public beta of Yosemite, you'll definitely want to update to these latest versions. ($49.99 for BBEdit, free update, 12.5 MB, release notes; free for TextWrangler, 9.4 MB, release notes)

Review: Parallels Desktop 10 brings even tighter OS X/Windows integration, overall performance improvements

Review: Parallels Desktop 10 brings even tighter OS X/Windows integration, overall performance improvements

Parallels Desktop has long been one of the go-to applications for using your Mac to virtualize a wide variety of operating systems, and many considered its previous version 9 as more than sufficient for getting this job done. While the software shining point has always been its ability to run Windows truly parallel to the standard Mac OS X desktop, this version of Parallels Desktop 10 for Mac takes multiple strides forward, making it even easier than before to incorporate Windows-only applications--or applications from other x86 operating systems including Android, Chrome, Linux, etc.--into your Mac-based workflow.

Perhaps most importantly, Parallels again ups the ante in speed both in launching and runtime, turning virtualization into a native-feeling experience. -- 9to5Mac.

Where's the best place to trade in an iPhone? $400+ offers compared at Apple, Amazon, NextWorth, Gazelle and more

Where's the best place to trade in an iPhone? $400+ offers compared at Apple, Amazon, NextWorth, Gazelle and more

We're 2 short weeks away from Apple's iPhone 6 announcement and that of course means it is almost time to trade in your current but now outdated tiny iPhone 3/4/5/s/c. Giving your non-sapphire 4-incher to a friend or relative? That's nice of you but for those in the US who prefer cold hard cash, there are lots of great options out there. -- 9to5Mac.

These are the best messaging apps on iOS

These are the best messaging apps on iOS

I recently watched The Lady try to convince a friend of ours to download WhatsApp. The friend is moving to the United Kingdom, and we want to stay in touch. Our friend tried to say that email would do the job, but we all know that will never work.

Our friend doesn't want WhatsApp (maybe because it's owned by Facebook), and she doesn't own an iPhone, so iMessage is out. Thankfully, there are plenty of free and good alternatives. Some are more secure, some have more features, and none of them is owned by Facebook.

Let's take a look at what's available and how these very different messaging apps compare on a number of key features. -- Cult of Mac.

How to fix disabled audio in OS X 10.10 Yosemite beta

How to fix disabled audio in OS X 10.10 Yosemite beta

Apple launched, almost a week ago, the second public beta build of OX 10.10 Yosemite, which, among other improvements, includes a healthy dose of bug fixes. But, for some reason, the company has not yet addressed a glaring sound problem, where the audio stops working until a restart is performed. It is likely this occurs in the developer-only builds too. -- BetaNews.

How to Make Your Mac Talk Using the Say Command in Terminal

How to Make Your Mac Talk Using the Say Command in Terminal

Ever since the introduction of the first Macintosh computer in 1984, text-to-speech has been a major feature of the platform. While the Mac's speech quality and capabilities have increased greatly since then, there's still an old school way to make your Mac talk: the Terminal.

To use speech in Terminal, open a new Terminal window and type say followed by a space and your desired word or phrase, and then press the Return key. -- TekRevue.

Why Don't We Use This Browser?

Why Don't We Use This Browser?

There is little question that we live in the 'golden age of browsers.' Every major browser renders webpages fast, with similar results, and has plenty of user-centric features.

Each of the major browsers has a distinct personality; fast, more secure, plenty of add-ons, or default. There is one browser that does not fall into the 'major browser' category that has been around for years yet is seldom used. Why? -- Mac 360.

iPhone Killswitch: How to Enable Activation Lock

iPhone Killswitch: How to Enable Activation Lock

On Monday, California mandated that all smartphones ship with a killswitch installed and turned on by default. That's very nice, but not as nice as Apple's iPhone killswitch.

For example every iPhone, iPad or iPod touch running iOS 7, which as released in October 2013, already has killswitch technology built in. Here is how to turn on Apple's iPhone killswitch feature, aka Activation Lock. -- FairerPlatform.

7 ingenious iPhone camera tricks you really need to try

7 ingenious iPhone camera tricks you really need to try

So you like using your iPhone to take pictures -- but are you really using your iPhone camera to its fullest potential? A new video featuring photographer Lorenz Holder shows you seven new ways to make your iPhone 5s camera more useful than ever before by giving you new tips and tricks for taking photos that will wow your friends. -- BGR.

The top iOS 8 features for business users

The top iOS 8 features for business users

When it shows up in the coming weeks, Apple's iOS 8 is set to bring several new features, including its HealthKit and HomeKit platforms, to the iPhone and iPad. Many of the advances are consumer-oriented and focused on creating a seamless experience across iOS devices and Macs running the forthcoming OS X Yosemite.

Even with that consumer focus, however, there are some incredible features for business users in iOS 8. -- Macworld.

Why Apple Builds In Usability Differences And Similarities To The Mac, iPhone, And iPad

Why Apple Builds In Usability Differences And Similarities To The Mac, iPhone, And iPad

There is little doubt that Apple would like customers to purchase a Mac, an iPhone, and an iPad, and each product's capabilities-- features and functions-- are cleverly positioned to optimize those multi-device sales. That explains why many, many Apple customers have all three devices. Each has functionality that is different enough from the other two to be beneficial as a standalone device, or in concert with the other two devices.

Each device provides great usability and value as a standalone device, but works in a blended harmony with the other two in such a way as to entice customers to purchase one of each. -- PixoBebo.

August 25 Monday's News

 

Apple activates iPhone 5 battery replacement program, to swap out affected parts for free

Apple activates iPhone 5 battery replacement program, to swap out affected parts for free

Apple on Friday announced a free replacement program for iPhone 5 batteries after discovering certain units sold during a five-month period after the product's launch in 2012 contain faulty components.

As noted by the program's dedicated webpage, Apple discovered a "very small percentage" of iPhone 5 handsets may suffer from unexpectedly short battery life due to an unannounced issue presumably related to manufacturing.

According to Apple, iPhone 5 units affected by the problem come from a batch sold between the product's launch in September 2012 through January 2013.

Owners who purchased their handset within that time period and are experiencing shortened battery life symptoms can check if their unit is eligible for replacement via Apple's website. A serial number is needed to process the request.

As with past replacement programs, users with affected iPhones will be required to take their handset in to an Apple Authorized Service Provider, Apple Store or send it off to Apple for examination prior to service in order to verify eligibility.

Aside from determining whether an iPhone contains one of the known-faulty batteries, the phone must be in working order to be eligible for a part swap. Any damage that would make replacement of the battery difficult, like a cracked screen, would first need to be fixed, meaning the swap-out could come at a cost.

For now, the initiative is limited to users in the U.S. and China, though coverage will be expanded to other countries on Aug. 29. Apple is extending the program to users with affected iPhone 5 batteries for two years after first retail sale or until Mar. 1, 2015, whichever provides longer coverage.

The program's start comes just weeks before Apple is expected to reveal a next-generation iPhone lineup on Sept. 9.

OS X Finder: Customize Your Desktop

OS X Finder: Customize Your Desktop

Did you know that you've got all kinds of options for how your Mac's Desktop looks and behaves? It's true. You can make the icons that appear there much larger or smaller, increase or decrease the space between them, and even force the items on your Desktop to sort themselves into rows. All of this magic is the subject of today's Quick Tip. -- The Mac Observer.

Week of Who, Day Five: Curse of Fatal Death

Week of Who, Day Five: Curse of Fatal Death

Week of Who concludes today with The Curse of Fatal Death, a special produced as part of a telethon for the Red Nose Day charity. This is a notable piece of Doctor Who history because it makes more than a few connections between the old series and the new, notable among them being that the "episode" was written by now current executive producer of Doctor Who, Steven Moffat. It was part of the Red Nose Day telethon in 1999, and has been affectionately adopted as part of the Whoniverse. Like a ridiculous, but lovable uncle, if your uncle was Rowan Atkinson. Enjoy the new series! -- The Mac Observer.

Change and manage Mail's New Mail sound

Change and manage Mail's New Mail sound

If you use OS X Mail, as with most e-mail clients you will hear a small new mail notification sound when you receive new messages. If you do not like the default sound that is configured for Mail, then you can change it. Not only can you change to use one of Apple's built-in sounds, but you can use any sound bite you want. -- MacIssues.

An Aperture User Tries Lightroom

An Aperture User Tries Lightroom

Given the unfortunate news about Apple not actively developing Aperture anymore, I decided to try Lightroom while shooting in Svalbard. I'm trying to figure out if I should keep using Aperture for the immediate future and wait for Photos to be more fleshed out or to switch to Lightroom now and not have to migrate even more photos later (I have terabytes of digital photos from 12+ years of shooting digital cameras and scans of slides about 20 years ago managed in Aperture). The short answer is that I'm still unsure, I'm leaning towards sticking with Aperture, but some small changes to Lightroom (or lack of improvements to Photos) could make me change my mind. -- Josh Anon.

Parallels Desktop 10 for Mac Review

Parallels Desktop 10 for Mac Review

Parallels announced the tenth version of Parallels Desktop for the Mac. The new version goes further where version 9 stopped. There is more integration with OS X, almost completely blurring the line between the two with a "Reveal in Windows" context menu option, the ability to share with Mac native sharing features and 'iMessage' from within Windows and have the Mac Dock show an "unread email" indicator for the Windows version of Microsoft Outlook. -- IT.Enquirer.

Mastering Video Recording & Editing With QuickTime

Mastering Video Recording & Editing With QuickTime

For every one of your needs, there is a tool out there that can help you fulfill it. The capability of these tools evolve over time and price tags. For such tools, the functions of time and cost are inversely proportional (with all technology really). Finding tools to capture, edit and render videos for free without an annoying watermark or resolution limit was a distant dream 5 years ago, now you can do that from your Quicktime player and not lose a modicum of quality. Following is a guide on how to put your Quicktime X to best use. -- AddictiveTips.

OS X Yosemite: How to Use the New, More Powerful Spotlight Search

OS X Yosemite: How to Use the New, More Powerful Spotlight Search

Apple's latest desktop operating system, OS X Yosemite, won't officially come out until sometime this fall. But now that its public beta is open, both developers and a large number of Mac owners are able to use a preview version of the landmark OS.

For those who've just started using the beta, or are just anticipating its launch later this year, we've got some tips on how to best take advantage of the redesigned OS and its many new features. In this edition, we take on Apple's systemwide search, Spotlight. -- Wired.

Encoding miracles and missing audiobook chapters

Encoding miracles and missing audiobook chapters

It's easy to forget that some of the technology we use is, to paraphrase a great author, nearly indistinguishable from voodoo. One reader wrote in asking for some clarification about lossless compression, and I explain the magic in this week's column. I also look at a question about iOS device backups, and one about missing audiobook chapters in iOS. -- Macworld.

Quicken Disses the Mac One More Time

Quicken Disses the Mac One More Time

It is well known that the Mac version of Quicken has long trailed behind the Windows version. Why this should be so is anyone's guess. The price of Quicken 2015 for Mac is $74.99, same as Quicken Deluxe for Windows, a mid-priced version. On the basis of price alone, customers have a right to expect comparable products.

But that's not quite how Quicken works.

Indeed, the latest version of the app actually dispenses with features that existed in previous Mac versions. -- The Tech Night Owl.

The Great Upgrade Freakout (and how to deal with it)

The Great Upgrade Freakout (and how to deal with it)

There's no stopping change.

And there's no stopping the reaction of a tech client who might be less than enthralled with whatever necessary changes you had to incorporate to save their data, upgrade their Mac and/or get their Mac working again. Yes, their computer is back, but something is either slightly or radically different and this is sticking in their craw. A user interface has changed in the new version of Microsoft Office, they liked the old version of iTunes better, or they didn't expect those new icons in that new version of Mac OS X that you had to install to make a print driver or application work. -- Macworld.

How To Tell If Apple Owes You A New iPhone 5 Battery

How To Tell If Apple Owes You A New iPhone 5 Battery

If you're currently using an Apple iPhone 5 and experiencing significantly shorter battery life, don't worry -- it's not just you. Fortunately, the company has noticed and is offering to replace certain iPhone 5 batteries for free. But the catch is not all iPhone 5 units are eligible. -- International Business Times .

How to view desktop versions of websites on an iPhone

How to view desktop versions of websites on an iPhone

Generally, websites will configure their look based on the kind of browser you're using--specifically, the browser agent. When you visit a site, your browser reports its identity. If it identifies itself as the desktop version of Safari, for example, you see one view. If it reveals that it's the version of Safari used by iOS devices, you may see a different layout that better suits small screens. Some sites will allow you to choose something other than the default view, but this isn't a feature implemented web-side. -- Macworld.

The 10 apps every college student needs to have

The 10 apps every college student needs to have

Going off to college for the first time is an exciting experience, but it can also be a stressful one. There are books to buy, exams to take, friends to make--the list goes on. The life of a high schooler living at home is quite a bit different than that of a college freshman living on his or her own for the first time. The good news is that you can make the transition a lot smoother with some useful digital tools. The apps below will help you with everything from saving money to finding food to getting to class on time. -- TechHive.