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As usual, MacVolPlace News will go on vacation from today until December 1 as I prepare to do unspeakable things to poultry. Have a happy!

November 21 Friday's News

 

Apple issues first OS X 10.10.2 Yosemite beta to developers for testing

Apple issues first OS X 10.10.2 Yosemite beta to developers for testing

Three days after releasing the OS X 10.10.1 Yosemite maintenance update, Apple on Thursday seeded the first beta for its next OS X 10.10.2 update to developers.

Apple pushed out the first OS X 10.10.2 build, dubbed 14C68k, through the Software Update mechanism in OS X Yosemite and subsequently published release notes on its developer portal.

Although no focus areas are offered to developers in the seed notes, Apple details a known issue regarding a failure to open documents from iCloud Drive. The current workaround requires users to first move the files out of iCloud Drive before opening. -- AppleInsider.

Dropbox says OS X 10.10.1 Yosemite update resolves crashing issue, urges download

Dropbox says OS X 10.10.1 Yosemite update resolves crashing issue, urges download

Following Apple's release of OS X 10.10.1 Yosemite on Monday, Dropbox is sending emails to users confirming that the latest Mac maintenance update solves a rare crashing problem seen with apps integrated with Finder. -- AppleInsider.

Create Holiday and Other Calendar Subscriptions in OS X and iOS 8

Create Holiday and Other Calendar Subscriptions in OS X and iOS 8

It's not hard to set up some personal and work calendars on your Mac and iPhone. But there's a whole lot more you can do with calendar subscriptions. John Martellaro shows you how to get your calendar in the holiday mood. -- The Mac Observer.

iFixit: How to fix your iPhone 6 or 6 Plus in 21 easy guides

iFixit: How to fix your iPhone 6 or 6 Plus in 21 easy guides

iFixit gave Apple's iPhone 6 a repairability score of 7, the highest ever for Apple's flagship and most popular device in their September teardown. That bodes well for folks who want to take their iPhone repairs into their own hands, though perhaps it's best to give the Geniuses at Apple a chance to gift you an out of warranty repair before getting your hands dirty.

In any case, today iFixit announced an updated library of 21 repair guides for the iPhone 6 (and 14 for the 6 Plus). The new guides cover everything from replacing the battery to speakers to the glass panel and everything in between. The tutorials walk you through the process and also conveniently provide links to purchase any necessary tools you might not have (hit up their Amazon store for some hefty discounts).

As with any iPhone take-apart, be very careful and be prepared to forfeit your warranty if you screw up. -- iFixit.

Apple pushes Flash Player update to address security issues

Apple pushes Flash Player update to address security issues

Apple has issued a new update for Adobe's Flash Player browser plugin. The update fixes "a recently-identified Adobe Flash Player web plug-in vulnerability," according to Apple's website. Users will be automatically prompted to install the update when visiting a page that uses Flash Player.

The prompt in Safari will take users to the Flash Player download page on Adobe's website. Users who haven't yet seen the prompt can also go there to download the update now.

Private I: It's time to encrypt everything

Private I: It's time to encrypt everything

If we've learned anything from the last few years, it's that given the opportunity to snoop on or scarf up our data or our metadata, criminals, business, and governments have a lot in common. They may have different ends that drive why they want to look at our email and transactions, listen in to phone calls, track with whom we communicate, and follow our location, but it all involves a lack of consent.

We can take action into our hands and reject their assault on our privacy by encrypting as much of our data as we can, mostly in transit when it's at its most vulnerable. Tools have never been more powerful, and we've never had as many options from which to choose. It's about to get even better. -- Macworld.

Dear Mac users, please, please backup today

Dear Mac users, please, please backup today

SSD drives are superfast, but there ain't no recovery -- just backup.

That fast Mac with an SSD drive delivers blistering performance -- until disaster strikes. That's when you really need to have a backup system in place. -- Computerworld.

Future Presents: A Tech Gift Guide From the Cutting Edge

Future Presents: A Tech Gift Guide From the Cutting Edge

The Innovative Gadgets and Electronic Toys to Buy This Holiday Season.

Let us help you select the perfect tech gift. Try the WSJ.D Gadget GiftSayer for fast advice on nearly 100 items, from cameras, laptops, tablets and smartphones to toys for your children or pets. -- Wall Street Journal.

November 20 Thursday's News

 

App Store download buttons change from 'Free' to 'Get' as in-app purchases dominate revenue

App Store download buttons change from 'Free' to 'Get' as in-app purchases dominate revenue

With many "free" applications carrying hidden costs in the form of in-app purchases, Apple has stopped labeling free-to-download iOS apps as "Free" on the App Store, instead requiring users to tap a button that reads "Get" in order to install the software. -- AppleInsider.

Apple continues to enhance Maps app with new business listings providers

Apple continues to enhance Maps app with new business listings providers

After Apple's Maps app launched to negative reviews in 2012, the company has actively taken steps to enhance the fledgling navigation service, the latest effort being the addition of listings data from at least ten new companies. -- AppleInsider.

The 2014 Ars Technica gift guide

The 2014 Ars Technica gift guide

Over the past year, the Ars staff has collectively run a bunch of benchmarks, worn a lot of earbuds, downloaded a zillion apps, and cursed at more than a few red light cameras. So for our 2014 gift guide, we're taking the opportunity to recall the best things we've officially reviewed and place them alongside a few favorite office and lifestyle additions that we never dedicated a full report to. To simplify the usual gift-hunting fracas, send our massive Good List to a loved one as a subtle hint or pick through it to be a not-so-secret-Santa for yourself. -- Ars Technica.

iOS 8.1.1, iPhone 4S, and iPad 2: A little faster, kind of, sometimes

iOS 8.1.1, iPhone 4S, and iPad 2: A little faster, kind of, sometimes

It would be a stretch to say that iOS 7.1 made the iPhone 4 feel fast, but the update improved the phone's performance as much as could reasonably be expected for then-three-and-a-half-year-old hardware. It took what had been a disappointing update and made it usable./p>

Jump ahead to iOS 8, an update which did pretty much the same thing to the iPhone 4S, the iPad 2, and other hardware based on Apple's aging A5 chip. App launch times slowed. Animations got choppy. Performance became inconsistent. It was the update that made them stop feeling "fast enough," which makes Apple's decision to keep selling the first-gen iPad Mini all the more confusing./p>

iOS 8.1.1 came out on Monday, promising an iOS 7.1-style update for older devices like the iPhone 4S, iPad 2, iPad Mini, and first-generation iPod Touch. We're here to dispel those notions. iOS 8.1.1 improves performance in a few specific places, ones that may well be important to heavy users. However, it doesn't improve responsiveness or consistency, two of the problems you'll notice the most if you upgrade from iOS 7. Let's look at the short list of things you can expect to improve if you're using an older iDevice and the longer list of things that won't. -- Ars Technica.

iBank 5: Dr Mac Can Finally Say Goodbye to Quicken

iBank 5: Dr Mac Can Finally Say Goodbye to Quicken

I love managing my finances on my Mac, but I have never liked depending upon Intuit or its Quicken for Mac products. Intuit, as you probably know, has no love for Mac users. Bob "Dr. Mac" LeVitus has been looking for a personal finance solution for the Mac since 1998, and he finally found it: iBank 5. -- The Mac Observer.

How to subscribe to RSS feeds in Safari 8

How to subscribe to RSS feeds in Safari 8

If you have been a fan of using RSS feeds for keeping updated on the happenings of your favorite Web sites, then you will be happy to know that Apple has added RSS feed support back to Safari. In the past, when browsing a Web site with an RSS feed you would see an indication of this support in Safari's address bar, and then could click it to view the RSS feed and subscribe to it; however, this was removed in subsequent versions up to version 8, where Apple has brought this feature back. -- MacIssues.

Picking Your Car's Computerized Brain

Picking Your Car's Computerized Brain

New smartphone-connected devices use a car's diagnostic port to help drivers track fuel usage, troubleshoot mechanical problems, find parking and more.

EVEN with their high-tech gadgets and computerized machinery, most cars still do a pretty poor job of providing helpful information about things like mechanical problems and fuel use -- and of connecting to the devices we use the most, our phones.

Improvements are on the horizon. Wireless connections are available in some new models, which could lead to more helpful tools. But even for many older models, there is an easy way to get better information about your car, including fuel usage, diagnostics and data about your driving habits. -- New York Times.

Apple Issues Strict Rules for the First Watch Apps

Apple Issues Strict Rules for the First Watch Apps

The release of Apple's WatchKit yields more insight into how the company is tackling smart-watch issues.

This Tuesday Apple released WatchKit, a set of software tools, rules, and recommendations for developing apps for its forthcoming Apple Watch. The release sheds more light on the company's vision for the device and its plans to work out some common challenges related to issues like power consumption, device navigation, and very small screen size. As with the iPhone before it, the popularity of the new device could depend, in large part, on the apps made for it. -- MIT Technology Review.

The Mac's Second Act: From Obscurity to Ubiquity

The Mac's Second Act: From Obscurity to Ubiquity

When Apple announced its most recent earnings, the big surprise was the performance of a product which, while once synonymous with the whole company, had become a footnote to many: The Mac.

In fact, Mac sales in the quarter ended Sept. 30 were so strong that the venerable computer brand reached its best market share since 1995, and logged an 18 percent growth in revenue from the same quarter last year. -- re/code.

Why No One Can Copy Apple's Hardware Design

Why No One Can Copy Apple's Hardware Design

Many companies want to build products with the quality of Apple's, but as Ben Einstein of Bolt explains, that's nearly impossible to do. One reason is that Apple has bought up many of the machines and companies capable of such precision manufacturing. Besides that, Apple has mastered some of the most difficult manufacturing processes, such as color matching white plastic, mass-scale CNC machining, and laser-drilling holes. -- Bolt.

Which Network Powers Which Service in OS X 10.10 Yosemite and iOS 8

Which Network Powers Which Service in OS X 10.10 Yosemite and iOS 8

With Continuity, OS X 10.10 Yosemite and iOS 8 can share all sorts of information, but it can be confusing to know which network drives which service: a local Wi-Fi connection, a general Internet connection, or Bluetooth? Ars Technica has a detailed explanation of how AirDrop, AirPlay, Handoff, Instant Hotspot, SMS and phone forwarding, and other features work. -- Ars Technica.

Fitbit users can finally view their data in the Health app thanks to 99 cent sync tool

Fitbit users can finally view their data in the Health app thanks to 99 cent sync tool

A 99 cent app finally allows owners of Fitbit activity trackers to view their data in Apple's Health app. Sync Solver for Fitbit provides a daily sync of ten different pieces of data to the Health app built into iOS 8 -- a feature the company itself said it had no plans to introduce. -- 9to5Mac.

Here's why beacon networks are the way to go for retailers & app developers supporting iBeacon

Here's why beacon networks are the way to go for retailers & app developers supporting iBeacon

If you're a retailer, you have two options when it comes to deploying Bluetooth beacons. You can deploy the hardware yourself and build an accompanying mobile app for the experience, or you can open the experience to existing apps that users already have on their device using a beacon network. Some retailers have decided they want to own the experience and have everything go through their own mobile app, but new data suggests that might not be the way to go. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple patents smoke detectors in iDevices that can call 911, activate sprinklers and locate building occupants

Apple patents smoke detectors in iDevices that can call 911, activate sprinklers and locate building occupants

The Nest smoke detector may look decidedly old-fashioned if one Apple patent ever makes it into production. Apple has patented the idea of embedding smoke detectors into "electronic devices" and using those devices to provide a comprehensive response to a fire. -- 9to5Mac.

November 19 Wednesday's News

 

One Man's Opinion: Sometimes I Just Hate OS X

One Man's Opinion: Somtimes I Just Hate OS X

Once upon a time I could do anything I wanted with the Mac OS or OS X. But lately, thanks to Apple, I can do less and less without paying money for what used to be free.

I have all the usual Apple stuff at my house; WiFi, iPad, iPhones and iMac. I do not have "AirPrint" anything.

Previously if I wanted to share a printer connected to my Mac on my home network I did if from my Mac, it appeared on my network done. But those days are gone forever.

So I had to buy an application to put my iMac connected printer (it is an Epson inkjet printer) onto my WiFi network so my iPad and iPhones can print to it.

What I found was Netputing's handyPrint. It is shareware (and yes I paid for it) which has a free 14 day trial with no limits. Since I was installing it after updating my iMac to 10.10.1, and it worked first time from all devices, I had no worries. I recommend it.

My problem is not with Netputing, I am happy to support software developers, it is that Apple made me buy it because of what they have removed from OS X. In OS X I turn on Printer Sharing and nothing happens and even if you download Epson's iPad app NADA!

Anyway, that's one man's opinion.

Apple awarded patent for augmented reality devices with transparent displays

Apple awarded patent for augmented reality devices with transparent displays

Apple this week was awarded ownership of a patent that describes future electronics with transparent displays, allowing users to view real-world events simultaneously with on-screen generated images. -- AppleInsider.

Apple releases WatchKit developer tools for creating Apple Watch apps & more

Apple releases WatchKit developer tools for creating Apple Watch apps & more

Apple on Tuesday announced the availability of WatchKit, allowing developers to begin creating custom third-party applications, Glances and actionable notifications for the upcoming Apple Watch, before the wrist-worn accessory hits the market in early 2015. -- AppleInsider.

World's first Mac Pro data center comes online

World's first Mac Pro data center comes online

The Mac Pro is one of the most beautiful and powerful computers ever created, but it remains beyond the reach of many small developers due to a price tag that's bigger than a car down payment.

That could change this week when MacStadium brings the world's first Mac Pro data center online, giving anyone the ability to rent server time on the high-performance Apple computers for just a few bucks a month.

MacStadium CEO Greg McGraw said the company originally set out to address the needs of small developers with Mac mini hosting. "We had great success with the Mac mini and we'll continue to use it," McGraw told Cult of Mac. "But the Mac Pro is an enterprise-class data center appliance. It's going to open up a whole new market." -- Cult of Mac.

iOS 8.2 beta arrives with support for Apple Watch

iOS 8.2 beta arrives with support for Apple Watch

The mad dash to develop the first wave of Apple Watch apps has just begun, and to go along with the new WatchKit for devs, Apple has also released the first iOS 8.2 beta this morning. -- Cult of Mac.

Using AirDrop with OS X Yosemite and iOS

Using AirDrop with OS X Yosemite and iOS

For today's Quick Tip, we're going to cover a new way to share files between your iOS devices and your recent-model Macs running Yosemite-AirDrop. Using this nifty little feature, you can pop a bunch of images from a trip onto your iPhone quickly and easily, say, or you could send a PDF file and import it right into iBooks. Neat, right? We think so. -- The Mac Observer.

OS X Updates Disable Mail Plugins, MailPluginFix Restores Them

OS X Updates Disable Mail Plugins, MailPluginFix Restores Them

Apple has a tendency to toss in updates to its own native apps as part of system updates. This can sometimes break your carefully crafted email system, particularly if it contains plugins unhappy about a new version number. Kelly has an idea to help you get back on track. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple to Begin Allowing Accessory Manufacturers to Include Lightning Ports Early Next Year

Apple to Begin Allowing Accessory Manufacturers to Include Lightning Ports Early Next Year

While Apple's Lightning connector has become ubiquitous across the company's iOS device lineup over the past several years, third-party accessory manufacturers have so far been unable to include ports for the connector on their products. That appears set to change in the relatively near future, however, as Apple has informed members of the company's MFi program that it will begin shipping a version of the Lightning port for third-party use early next year. -- 9to5Mac.

Adobe Launches Lightroom 5.7 with Built-In Migration Tool for Aperture and iPhoto

Adobe Launches Lightroom 5.7 with Built-In Migration Tool for Aperture and iPhoto

Adobe today updated Lightroom to version 5.7, bringing a number of new features including a built-in importer tool for users migrating their content from Aperture and iPhoto. The update follows the release of a separate plugin last month which contained similar functionality. The update also allows users to view comments and feedback from collection on Lightroom's web interface and contains bug fixes. -- Mac Rumors.

How to reveal files in the Finder with Spotlight

How to reveal files in the Finder with Spotlight

Spotlight allows you to search for all of your files, applications, and other items on your Mac, allowing you to open them directly by highlighting them and pressing Enter, or even dragging them off the Spotlight menu (or window, for Yosemite) for various drag-and-drop purposes in OS X. While you can manage your listed search results in this way, if needed there may be times when you might want to find exactly where the file is on your Mac, or otherwise handle it in the Finder. -- MacIssues.

Quickly access old window zoom behavior in OS X Yosemite

Quickly access old window zoom behavior in OS X Yosemite

One of the new features in OS X Yosemite is a re-working of the full-screen window feature where in programs that support this option, the green zoom window button now defaults to being a toggle for full-screen. This can be seen in programs like Pages, and Preview; however, this can be a bit confusing because in those like TextEdit where a fullscreen option is not available, the green button is the classic "Zoom" behavior that resizes a window to fit its contents. -- MacIssues.

Apple was Granted 44 Patents Today Covering a Sensing System, Maps, Psychovisual Image Compression & iPad Mini Design

Apple was Granted 44 Patents Today Covering a Sensing System, Maps, Psychovisual Image Compression & iPad Mini Design

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 44 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we focus on an advanced sensing system designed for Apple's iDevices while touching on three additional patents relating to mapping, image compression and a possible future iPad frame construction that uses composite materials that could further lighten the design. On another front, Apple's original iPad mini was finally granted a design patent today. And last but not least, we wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Mac users say Yosemite 10.10.1 update did nothing to fix Wi-Fi

Mac users say Yosemite 10.10.1 update did nothing to fix Wi-Fi

Apple released Yosemite 10.10.1 on Monday to fix Wi-Fi problems that hundreds of Mac owners had reported since the operating system was released last month. But for many, the update did nothing to restore connectivity, and for some 10.10.1 caused Wi-Fi problems where none existed before. -- Macworld.

Apple OS X Yosemite: the key features

Apple OS X Yosemite: the key features

First debuted in June of this year, Yosemite has now been updated to version 10.10.1. Here's all you need to know about Apple's latest operating system, and how it works with existing iDevices. -- Telegraph.

iOS 8.1.1 on iPad gives back 500MB of storage space

iOS 8.1.1 on iPad gives back 500MB of storage space

iOS 8.1.1 not only provides bug fixes and performance improvements, especially for iPhone 4s and iPad 2, but it also comes with a nice surprise for all iPad owners -- it returns about half a gigabyte of storage space. -- iMore.

Apple iOS 8.1.1

Apple iOS 8.1.1

Apple has released iOS 8.1.1 (free), and it's one of those upgrades that seems to benefit everyone. While presented as a minor update, iOS 8.1.1 is full of improvements and bug fixes. The Apple developer community had their hands on this version of iOS for about two weeks before the public did, giving them time to fix apps that were affected by the change. Many issues with battery life, Wi-Fi stability, and third-party keyboard functionality seem to be improved. According to the release notes, iPhone 4s and iPad 2 owners in particular will benefit from better performance, and that's exactly what we've seen with older devices on which we've installed the new version. It's excellent to see Apple not only supporting these older devices, but actively working to keep them viable. -- PC Magazine.

The ultimate guide on how and where to use Apple Pay

The ultimate guide on how and where to use Apple Pay

Roughly one month after we first saw a demo of Tim Cook scanning an iPhone at a cash register to buy stuff, Apple Pay arrived for the rest of us to check out. But before you go blowing your entire paycheck on everything from big handbags to Big Macs, there are a few things to keep in mind about the platform. Read on to learn more about how Apple Pay works, how to get your iPhone ready for it, and most importantly, where you can go test it out yourself. -- Macworld.

How to Enable Phone Calls on iPad with iOS 8

 How to Enable Phone Calls on iPad with iOS 8

Continuity has been up and running on iOS for a few weeks now. We've been digging around in the new operating system, figuring out all of the fun and awesome things we can do with it. First, we figured out how to pick up where we left off using Handoff. Now, we are going to talk about how to send and receive phone calls on the iPad. In order to perform this convenient trick, you'll need an iPhone using the same iCloud account as the iPad, both devices on the same Wi-Fi network, and both devices running iOS 8.1. -- PadGadget.

November 18 Tuesday's News

 

Apple releases iOS 8.1.1 with performance improvements for iPad 2 & iPhone 4s, plus bug fixes

Apple releases iOS 8.1.1 with performance improvements for iPad 2 & iPhone 4s, plus bug fixes

Apple on Monday pushed out an update for its mobile operating system in the form of iOS 8.1.1, with the headline improvements coming for users of older devices like the iPad 2 and iPhone 4S. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's OS X Yosemite 10.10.1 update improves Wi-Fi reliability, fixes Mail bugs, more

Apple's OS X Yosemite 10.10.1 update improves Wi-Fi reliability, fixes Mail bugs, more

Apple's OS X Yosemite Mac operating system received a significant update on Monday designed to address nagging Wi-Fi connectivity issues that have plagued some users since its launch in October, along with a range of other bug fixes. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's scanner mouse patent dynamically adjusts resolution, displays images on housing

Apple's scanner mouse patent dynamically adjusts resolution, displays images on housing

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Tuesday granted Apple an invention covering a mouse peripheral with built-in chromatic sensor, a device designed to deal with tracking issues inherent in conventional designs while acting as a handheld scanner. -- AppleInsider.

A power user's guide to OS X Server, Yosemite edition

A power user's guide to OS X Server, Yosemite edition

OS X Server is in maintenance mode. That much was clear when Mavericks Server came out a year ago with just a handful of welcome-but-minor tweaks and improvements. The software hasn't grown stagnant, really--certainly not to the extent of something like Apple Remote Desktop, which only gets updated when it's time to support a new OS X version. But now OS X Server is changing very little from version to version, and since the untimely death of the Mac Mini Server, Apple isn't even selling any kind of server-oriented hardware.

Still, the Yosemite version of OS X Server changes enough to be worth revisiting. As with our pieces on Mavericks and Mountain Lion, this article should be thought of as less of a review and more of a guided tour through everything you can do with OS X Server. We'll pay the most attention to the new stuff, but we'll also detail each and every one of OS X Server's services, explaining what it does, how to use it, and where to find more information about it. In cases where nothing has changed, we have re-used portions of last year's review with updated screenshots and links. -- Ars Technica.

OS X Yosemite: Set Safari's Search Engine to DuckDuckGo

OS X Yosemite: Set Safari's Search Engine to DuckDuckGo

If you're looking for a more anonymous way to search the Internet than Google or Bing offers, OS X Yosemite lets you change your search engine to DuckDuckGo. It's easy and fast. Read on to learn how. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple TV (3rd Gen) Updated to 7.0.2, No Patch Notes

Apple TV (3rd Gen) Updated to 7.0.2, No Patch Notes

Apple pushed an update out for Apple TV (3rd Gen) on Monday, version 7.0.2. We have no idea what's in it because Apple hasn't released patch notes yet. We'll update this article when we know more. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple Granted a Major Patent for an Original Siri Invention

Apple Granted a Major Patent for an Original Siri Invention

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 44 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover one of the original patents related to Siri. -- Patently Apple.

Back up and restore your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch using iCloud or iTunes

Back up and restore your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch using iCloud or iTunes

You can use iCloud or iTunes to back up the content on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch. When you have a backup, you can restore this content to your device anytime.

Use iCloud to back up your iOS devices if you want an automatic backup solution, you want to restore content to your device from almost anywhere using Wi-Fi, you don't connect your device to a Mac or PC very often, or you don't own a Mac or PC.

Use iTunes if you frequently use the computer that hosts your backups, you don't have an iCloud account or don't want to use iCloud, you want on-site and networked backups, or you'd like to have a manual or secondary backup to use with your iCloud back up. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Using Markup and Mail Drop in the New Apple Mail

Using Markup and Mail Drop in the New Apple Mail

There are some great new features in Yosemite's update of Mail, and the real stars are Markup and Mail Drop, but the seamless integration of these new tools may make it hard to find them if you don't know where to look.

This tutorial will demonstrate how to access and use both of these new features to edit images, complete and sign PDF forms, and send attachments too large for email. -- Tuts+.

Get SendEmail working with Yosemite and Mavericks

Get SendEmail working with Yosemite and Mavericks

A while back, we found a nice little command line tool to send emails with authentication settings, custom subjects, etc., without using any of the built in email sending tools. This was handy for situations where a client might have various restrictions in place such as a relay server that requires authentication and / or a specific sender address to allow the emails to pass through. -- Amsys.

How to enable SMS/MMS relay on your Mac

How to enable SMS/MMS relay on your Mac

One of my favorite new continuity features shared between your Mac and your iPhone is SMS/MMS relay. The ability to read and send--not only iMessages but also multi-media messages to all your non-iOS friends is very helpful. Of course it's not for everyone but for those of us who like to have access to all of our messages on all of the devices we use this is a no-brainer. -- iSource.

A late night call

A late night call

Whenever I get a late night call I always fear the worst, I guess it is one of the unexplained features of being a parent. This night it was a very despondent child "My laptop has been stolen". After confirming that they were OK and that nothing irreplaceable had been stolen I immediately logged into the Undercover website and logged the laptop as stolen and waited... -- Macs In Chemistry.

How to remotely delete all of your Apple Pay credit cards if your iPhone is stolen

How to remotely delete all of your Apple Pay credit cards if your iPhone is stolen

By all accounts, Apple Pay has been a huge success for Apple. Despite some initial controversy surrounding the retailers that wouldn't accept the payment service, Apple has continued to add partners on a relatively consistent basis following launch, giving more and more users a chance to try it out.

One of the strengths of the service is the security it provides, but what happens if your iPhone 6 gets stolen? -- BGR.

15 Useful Pages at Apple.com You Might Not Know About

15 Useful Pages at Apple.com You Might Not Know About

Behind the front page of the Apple web site are some useful, interesting and entertaining pages. You can get PDF user manuals for your devices, submit feedback, find local user groups, view the status of Apple services, buy refurbished Macs, get Apple certification, apply for jobs, watch movie trailers and much more.

What am I doing wrong?

What am I doing wrong?

Judging from the complaints and all-around bad feelings I've been seeing on social networks lately, it appears that Mac OS X Yosemite and iOS 8 are huge failures that are causing everyone a lot of pain and agony. So, if three Macs running OS X Yosemite and four devices loaded with iOS 8 are working just fine for me and my wife, what am I doing wrong? -- TUAW.

Personal OS X Yosemite 10.10.1 (14B25) Benchmarks

NovaBench 1.1(2) benchmarking of my Intel iMac (2.9 GHz Intel Core i5, 16GB 1600 MHz DDR3 SDRAM, Graphics NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M 512 MB, 1TB Fusion Drive). Your mileage may vary.

Intel iMac
10.9.4 10.9.5 10.10 10.10.1
Over All Score: 991 Score: 1003 Score: 944 Score: 931
CPU Tests
Floating Point Operations/Sec:
Integer Operations/Sec:
MD5 Hashes Calculated/Sec:
Score: 500
152075024
317170368
1251912
Score: 503
155296352
315012928
1256680
Score: 505
152557232
314994976
1290712
Score: 491
144886992
310283168
1267648
Ram Test
RAM Speed:
Score: 224
9322 MB/s
Score: 224
9331 MB/s
Score: 224
9398 MB/s
Score: 224
9364 MB/s
Graphics Test
3D Frames Per Second:
Score: 240
858
Score: 243
877
Score: 190
624
Score: 189
620
Hardware Tests
Primary Partition Capacity:
Drive Write Speed:
Score: 27
889 GB
97 MB/s
Score: 33
889 GB
127 MB/s
Score: 25
145 GB
87 MB/s
Score: 27
889 GB
96 MB/s

November 17 Monday's News

 

Issues with opening files stored on SharePoint in Word 2011

Issues with opening files stored on SharePoint in Word 2011

I have been debugging and issue I was having opening files stored on a SharePoint site using Word 2011 on OS X and thought I would share my results.

This process had been working previously. It started sometime after I updated to the newest OS X 10.10.1. But I can not say that was what did it because in all my testing, configuring, installing and programming something could have stepped on something else.

On a sperate boot sector (where I had done a clean install) the problem did NOT exist but on my main drive it kept opening it in the Word Web App in the browser which it was not supposed to do because of the settings on SharePoint.

My primary HD had not been updated in a "normal" way as I am constantly installing, uninstalling and testing.

My last best hope was to reinstall.

I took my copy of the OS X 10.10 installer and ran it.

Then I dowloaded Office 2011 from the OIT Software page and reinstalled it.

Then I downloaded the Office 2011 update from Microsoft and ran that.

And then I ran the OS X updates from Apple.

Last but not least it I opened Safari Extensions and made sure tha ClickToPlugin was NOT enabled (Firefox: Tools menu/Add-ons/Plugins) because there are a number of Internet plugins necessary for OS X and its browsers to work with Sharepoint:

  • SharePointBrowserPlugin.plugin
  • SharePointWebKitPlugin.webplugin
  • Silverlight.plugin

They are installed automatically but if they don't load you have a problem.

And after all that, SUCCESS.

OS X and its browsers are now handshaking with SharePoint and honoring the settings in the document library just as they used to.

So after all of that from OS X I can now click on a document in a SharePoint library and it will

  1. open a Word document in Word and
  2. allow me to check it out,
  3. edit it,
  4. save any changes and
  5. check it back in

If you are having this problem I can not guarantee this will work, but it did for me.

Apple releases Xcode 6.1.1 golden master with fixes for Swift, Xcode Server

Apple releases Xcode 6.1.1 golden master with fixes for Swift, Xcode Server

Apple on Friday issued to developers a golden master build of the upcoming Xcode 6.1.1 update, bringing bug fixes for Xcode Server, the Swift programming language and Interface Builder, among others.

The Xcode 6.1.1 GM, labeled build 6A2006, concentrates on fixing bugs from the most recent Xcode 6.1 release, including common SourceKit crashes in Swift and general issues with Xcode Server. -- AppleInsider.

Inside the net neutrality dispute, and why it's important to Apple users

Inside the net neutrality dispute, and why it's important to Apple users

Though you may pay a premium for one of the fastest internet connections your cable provider offers, a lack of net neutrality could cause your iCloud backups and iTunes movie rentals to take hours, rather than minutes. Here's why Apple users, and consumers in general, should care about net neutrality. -- AppleInsider.

AT&T stops using undeletable phone tracking IDs

AT&T stops using undeletable phone tracking IDs

AT&T says it has stopped its controversial practice of adding a hidden, undeletable tracking number to its mobile customers' Internet activity.

"It has been phased off our network," said Emily J. Edmonds, an AT&T spokeswoman.

The move comes after AT&T and Verizon received a slew of critical news coverage for inserting tracking numbers into their subscribers' Internet activity, even after users opted out. Last month, ProPublica reported that Twitter's mobile advertising unit was enabling its clients to use the Verizon identifier. The tracking numbers can be used by sites to build a dossier about a person's behavior on mobile devices, including which apps they use, what sites they visit and for how long. -- Ars Technica.

iOS is twice as memory-efficient as Android. Here's why.

iOS is twice as memory-efficient as Android. Here's why.

When the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus were announced, many Android fans laughed at the "pitiful" 1GB of RAM of Apple's flagship smartphone, when Android flagships tended to ship with 2GB and sometimes more.

But specs don't always -- or even most of the time -- tell the whole story. As it turns out, an iPhone 6 with 1GB of RAM runs much faster than a similarly specced Android smartphone with 2GB of RAM. And it all has to do with the fundamental difference in the way iOS and Android handle apps. -- Cult of Mac.

How To Disable Screenshot Shadows in Yosemite and Mavericks

How To Disable Screenshot Shadows in Yosemite and Mavericks

Today's tip comes from Charles Edge, author and long time Mac admin. If you're looking to forsake the drop shadows in screen shots, you can do so with a simple Terminal command. Kelly breaks it all down for you. -- The Mac Observer.

Six useful text management panels in OS X

Six useful text management panels in OS X

When typing out documents in OS X you might resort to the services offered by Microsoft Word and or Apple's Pages, as these have convenient tools for adjusting the type face, accessing special characters, and otherwise manipulating your text; however, in addition there are a number of built-in panels in OS X that can give you similar access to features like special characters, word suggestions, and dictionary lookup of word selections. Being built-in, these can work even in programs that do not have their own obvious text manipulation controls. -- MacIssues.

iOS 8 How-to: Remotely remove your credit cards from Apple Pay

iOS 8 How-to: Remotely remove your credit cards from Apple Pay

People have been enjoying using Apple Pay. Apple Pay is Apple's mobile payment system that allows you to pay for things in stores and through apps with different banks and credit cards. Using Apple Pay is more secure than swiping your credit or debit card because your card number, identity and CVV code are not visible to the merchant. Instead, with Apple Pay each card is assigned a unique Device Account Number that is encrypted and stored in the Secure Element, a dedicated chip in the device. Setting up Apple Pay is relatively straightforward and it is done through either Passbook or Settings. In this how-to article I will discuss how to remotely remove your credit cards from Apple Pay in case your iPhone or iPad gets stolen. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple Seeking Better Customer, Employee Insights

Apple Seeking Better Customer, Employee Insights

Job announcements for two new positions within Apple's corporate retail team indicates the company is sharpening its focus on relationships with customers and employees, to include updating the existing Net Promoter and other survey programs. The position descriptions don't provide any clues why Apple has become more interested in customer and employee feedback. However, employee discontent with wages and working conditions is well known, and customer complaints about Genius Bar wait times and obstacles to making purchases are documented daily on social media Web sites. -- ifo Apple Atore.

People Are Using Apple Pay A Lot, According To Retailers

People Are Using Apple Pay A Lot, According To Retailers

It is of course too early to say if Apple's mobile payment system will be a hit among consumers, though the early signs appear positive as iPhone-6-equipped shoppers get to grips with the new service at big-name retailers across the U.S.

According to a New York Times report over the weekend, Whole Foods saw more than 150,000 Apple Pay transactions across its 384 stores in the first three weeks following the service's launch in October.

iOS 8: 8 tips for taking better photographs

iOS 8: 8 tips for taking better photographs

Here are some useful tips for taking better photographs with an iOS 8 device.

The most popular camera on the planet, the iPhone 6's camera is still 8MP with an f/2.2 lens and processor but it now boasts phase detection pixels so it can focus an image twice as fast as the iPhone 5S.

Apple is serious about photography and that's why it puts so much energy into making the cameras inside of its devices technically better rather than just pumping in added megapixels. -- Computerworld.

Video: Al Franken destroys Ted Cruz for getting net neutrality 'completely wrong'

Video: Al Franken destroys Ted Cruz for getting net neutrality 'completely wrong'

Senator Ted Cruz ["stupid is as stupid does"] last week caused quite a stir -- and a lot of forehead slapping -- when he described net neutrality as "Obamacare for the Internet." CNN's Candy Crowley on Sunday sat down with Cruz's fellow senator Al Franken, a longtime net neutrality advocate who completely demolished Cruz's arguments against net neutrality for being "completely wrong." -- BGR.

Apple Disables Trim Support On 3rd Party SSDs In OS X

Apple Disables Trim Support On 3rd Party SSDs In OS X

One of the disadvantages to buying an Apple system is that it generally means less upgrade flexibility than a system from a traditional PC OEM. Over the last few years, Apple has introduced features and adopted standards that made using third-party hardware progressively more difficult. Now, with OS X 10.10 Yosemite, the company has taken another step down the path towards total vendor lock-in and effectively disabled support for third-party SSDs. -- HotHardware.