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January 23 Friday's News

 

Apple exploring smarter Smart Cover, new gesture controls for iPad

Apple exploring smarter Smart Cover, new gesture controls for iPad

Future iPads could come with even fewer physical buttons, as Apple is evaluating new ways to show contextually relevant information and allow quick access to device controls based on the position of the iPad's Smart Cover, according to a patent application published Thursday by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. -- AppleInsider.

iPhone usage rates correlate to education and population density, study finds

iPhone usage rates correlate to education and population density, study finds

According to a new study published on Thursday, usage rates of Apple's iPhone in the U.S. are positively correlated to users' level of education and population density, with northeastern states seeing a relatively higher concentration of iPhone owners. -- AppleInsider.

Office 2016 and Office for Windows touchscreens are due later this year

Office 2016 and Office for Windows touchscreens are due later this year

Office 2016 comes to desktops in 2H 2015, touch Office "later this year."

The Office tablet and phone apps for iOS and Android both ship with a touch-optimized subset of the features of the full flagship Office suite, and even though Microsoft is readying an Office release for Windows phones and tablets, the desktop version will still reign supreme. Microsoft says that the next version of the flagship suite, dubbed Office 2016, will be "generally available in the second half of 2015." It will remain optimized for keyboards and mice. -- Ars Technica.

Yes, 123456 is the most common password, but here's why that's misleading

Yes, 123456 is the most common password, but here's why that's misleading

I recently worked with SplashData to compile its 2014 Worst Passwords List, and yes, 123456 tops the list. In the data set of 3.3 million passwords I used for SplashData, almost 20,000 of those were in fact 123456. But how often do you genuinely see people using that, or the second most common password, password, in real life? Are people still really that careless with their passwords? -- Ars Technica.

Google drops three OS X 0days on Apple

Google drops three OS X 0days on Apple

Don't look now, but Google's Project Zero vulnerability research program may have dropped more zero-day vulnerabilities--this time on Apple's OS X platform.

In the past two days, Project Zero has disclosed OS X vulnerabilities here, here, and here. At first glance, none of them appear to be highly critical, since all three appear to require the attacker to already have some access to a targeted machine. What's more, the first vulnerability, the one involving the "networked 'effective_audit_token' XPC," may already have been mitigated in OS X Yosemite, but if so the Google advisory doesn't make this explicit and Apple doesn't publicly discuss security matters with reporters. -- Ars Technica.

iOS 8: New Mailbox Options

iOS 8: New Mailbox Options

This Quick Tip is about the two new mailbox options we've got under iOS 8: "Thread Notifications" and "Today." If you want a quick place to look at all of the emails that fall under those categories, this article's for you! -- The Mac Observer.

Debunking the 24-bit/192kHz Audio Hype

Debunking the 24-bit/192kHz Audio Hype

There's a debate raging in the audio world about whether we should listen to music encoded above the standard 16-bit 44.1kHz mark. Dave Hamilton joins Jeff Gamet to look at the differences between 16-bit 44.1kHz and 24-bit 192kHz, whether or not the science backs up the quality of 24-bit tracks, and why the bit depth doesn't necessarily translate to better sounding recordings. -- The Mac Observer.

Editing Photos on Your Mac Without Breaking the Bank

Editing Photos on Your Mac Without Breaking the Bank

Listen up! If you don't have the time, money, or inclination to master Photoshop CC, you're not out of luck. I know of at least two less-expensive yet full-featured Mac applications that do much of what Photoshop CC can do but cost significantly less. -- The Mac Observer.

'Marco Polo' App for Finding Misplaced iOS Devices Updated With Custom Responses and More

'Marco Polo' App for Finding Misplaced iOS Devices Updated With Custom Responses and More

Developer Matt Wiechec today released a major update to his Marco Polo iOS app that helps users recover misplaced iPhones and iPads with the sound of their voice. The new update brings custom responses and a new Notification Center widget that allows users to find other iOS devices also running the app. -- MacRumors.

Fix Mail unable to move Messages on your iPhone or iPad

Fix Mail unable to move Messages on your iPhone or iPad

As with Mail on OS X, the Mail app that Apple includes in iOS allows you to configure multiple e-mail accounts, but while you should be able to compose your e-mail and manage messages as you would in any e-mail client, there may be times when you run into an error when attempting to delete, archive, or otherwise manage your messages. -- MacIssues.

Apple Patent Reveals that Future iDevices may Adopt New Energy Efficient Radioluminescent or Photoluminescent Backlights

Apple Patent Reveals that Future iDevices may Adopt New Energy Efficient Radioluminescent or Photoluminescent Backlights

On January 22, 2015, the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals their work on improving the technology related to iDevice backlight units. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Touch ID & Orientation Audio Patents

Apple Touch ID & Orientation Audio Patents

On January 22, 2015, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a series of three new Touch ID patent applications from Apple in addition to one that covers orientation based audio that Apple first revealed back in 2013. -- Patently Apple.

Apple agrees to Chinese security audits of its products

Apple agrees to Chinese security audits of its products

According to a story in the Beijing News, Apple CEO Tim Cook has agreed to let China's State Internet Information Office to run security audits on products the company sells in China in an effort to counter concerns that other governments are using its devices for surveillance. -- ITWorld.

Apple details HomeKit compatibility with competing home automation platforms, rules out rival Wi-Fi gear

Apple details HomeKit compatibility with competing home automation platforms, rules out rival Wi-Fi gear

Apple will allow its upcoming Siri-controlled HomeKit platform to work with certain existing, non-HomeKit home automation products, including ones using competing protocols such as ZigBee or Z-Wave, but there are many limitations. According to sources briefed on the new specs, the latest Made for iPhone (MFi) licensing program specifications detail the types of home automation products other than HomeKit that Apple will permit to interact with its platform. -- 9to5Mac.

18 Conferences for Mac and iOS Professionals in 2015

18 Conferences for Mac and iOS Professionals in 2015

If you make your living in the Apple world, as a consultant, developer, designer, or tech, there are a wide variety of conferences you can attend to hone your skills, learn new topics, network with your fellow wizards, and generally open your mind to new ways of thinking. -- TidBITS.

Apple touts technology as core to education shake up

Apple touts technology as core to education shake up

Technology must be used to change, not simply assist, traditional education, according to Apple, which has called for personalized teaching for each student.

John Couch, vice president of education at Apple, said at BETT 2015 that technology is too often used simply to improve learning rather than to rework teaching techniques to the benefit of students. -- V3.

OS X Yosemite hidden feature series -- Part 2

OS X Yosemite hidden feature series -- Part 2

Following on from Part 1 in this Yosemite series, looking at features of Yosemite that are not so well known or perhaps even hidden, Part 2 will focus on added features to the Apple Safari web browser app.

Apple have spent a lot of time on their web browser, and it really is a strong competitor now. And today, I've grabbed my favourite little gems! -- Amsys.

How to verify a Time Machine backup

How to verify a Time Machine backup

We recently put out a call for topics you'd like to learn more about and one of the most popular suggestions was how to verify a Time Machine backup. After all, you've gone to all the trouble to create such a backup, it would be nice to know if it works. It turns out that there's not a completely clear-cut answer to this one. Let me explain. -- Macworld.

How to transfer your data from your old PC to your new Mac

How to transfer your data from your old PC to your new Mac

If you've just bought your first Mac and you're switching from a Windows PC, congratulations! Welcome to the fold. You're anxious to use your Mac, but you've amassed years of data on that PC. Switching platforms doesn't mean starting over: You can still use those old files. Apple makes it easy with a free utility called Migration Assistant. Here's how it works. -- iMore.

7 iTunes 12 tips Mac users need

7 iTunes 12 tips Mac users need

iTunes is the center of your digital world if you use a Mac, iPad or iPhone, so you need to get to grips with it to have a happier digital life. Inspired by an iMobie infographic, here's some pointers you may need. -- Computerworld.

Death By A Thousand Cuts: The Decline And Fall Of Apple's OS X

Death By A Thousand Cuts: The Decline And Fall Of Apple's OS X

Technology rag headlines for the past few months have heralded the decline of quality in the Mac, specifically problems associated with OS X Yosemite.

For months I've heard plenty and read everything I could about the dumbing down of OS X for the masses, lapses in Apple's quality control procedures, and the massive number of bugs in OS X Mavericks and OS X Yosemite. So, what's the real story? -- Mac 360.

How to remove an iPhone, iPad, or Mac from Find My iPhone and iCloud

How to remove an iPhone, iPad, or Mac from Find My iPhone and iCloud

Find My iPhone and iCloud work together so you can keep track of all your iPhones, iPads, and Macs, all in one place. If you're upgrading to a new device, trading in your existing one, or even selling it, however you'll want to make sure you completely remove it from Find my iPhone before letting it out of your possession. This ensures the new owner can't access your data and that they'll be able to link the device in question to their own iCloud account. -- iMore.

I accidentally deleted a photo off my iPhone, how can I get it back?

I accidentally deleted a photo off my iPhone, how can I get it back?

If you're running iOS 8, and it's been under 30 days since you deleted the photo, you can easily get it back. Here's how! -- iMore.

Guess What? Your Mac Is A Truck

Guess What? Your Mac Is A Truck

As much as I would like to have a big honkin' pick-up truck to tool around in, alas, as a Brooklyn, NY resident I'm relegated to the subway while my car sits in a secure garage and used sparingly.

Apple's co-founder, Steve Jobs, once proclaimed the post-PC era was upon us, that traditional PCs had become trucks, and mobile devices were the new cars. Well, you know what that means, right? That shiny new iMac with 5k Retina display and even that light-footed MacBook Air with all day battery life? They're both trucks. -- Mac 360.

How to Quit Social Media (and Why You Should)

How to Quit Social Media (and Why You Should)

If social media has you down, here's a guide to slowly but surely walk away, temporarily or for good.

There's a lot of different types of social media out there. Whether you're into the image sharing at Instagram, the pithy textual tweets of Twitter, or the uber-networking of everything social at Facebook, they're all more popular than ever.

But they are also under fire as much they've ever been. Do you realize that the first "Quit Facebook Day" was held almost five years ago? The social network was barely out of diapers at that point, and the backlash had already begun. Today, Facebook is the whipping boy of all things wrong with social networking, and maybe for good reason. But it doesn't matter what network you're into: when it takes over your life, it's not a good thing. -- PC Magazine.

January 22 Thursday's News

 

NSA leaker Edward Snowden refuses to use Apple's iPhone over spying concerns

NSA leaker Edward Snowden refuses to use Apple's iPhone over spying concerns

Infamous former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, responsible for leaking thousands of pages of classified intelligence documents from the secretive spy organization, reportedly believes that the iPhone contains "special software" that can be remotely activated by authorities for intelligence gathering purposes. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's fifth beta of OS X Yosemite 10.10.2 continues focus on WiFi, Mail & Bluetooth

Apple's fifth beta of OS X Yosemite 10.10.2 continues focus on WiFi, Mail & Bluetooth

Apple on Wednesday provided yet another pre-release version of its forthcoming update for OS X Yosemite to developers, asking testers to continue focusing on problem areas including Wi-Fi, Mail, VoiceOver, and Bluetooth. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's Logic Pro X gets massive update with new effects, tools, AirDrop support and more

Apple's Logic Pro X gets massive update with new effects, tools, AirDrop support and more

Apple on Wednesday released a huge update to its Logic Pro X professional digital audio workstation, complete with fresh drum and synth effects, redesigned plug-ins, an expanded sound library and support for new OS X features like AirDrop and Mail Drop. -- AppleInsider.

Hard disk reliability examined once more: HGST rules, Seagate is alarming

Hard disk reliability examined once more: HGST rules, Seagate is alarming

A year ago we got some insight into hard disk reliability when cloud backup provider Backblaze published its findings for the tens of thousands of disks that it operated. Backblaze uses regular consumer-grade disks in its storage because of the cheaper cost and good-enough reliability, but it also discovered that some kinds of disks fared extremely poorly when used 24/7.

A year later the company has collected even more data and drawn out even more differences between the different disks it uses.

For a second year, the standout reliability leader was HGST. Now a wholly owned subsidiary of Western Digital, HGST inherited the technology and designs from Hitachi (which itself bought IBM's hard disk division). Across a range of models from 2 to 4 terabytes, the HGST models showed low failure rates; at worse, 2.3 percent failing a year. This includes some of the oldest disks among Backblaze's collection; 2TB Desktop 7K2000 models are on average 3.9 years old, but still have a failure rate of just 1.1 percent.

Spending a few minutes face-to-face with Windows 10

Spending a few minutes face-to-face with Windows 10

Microsoft delivered Windows 10 and more during today's two-hour-plus media event. While holograms stole headlines, the new iteration of Windows 10--along with all the changes and improvements it brings--deserves a closer look. We'll be certain to spend some in-depth time with the new OS as it becomes available on desktop (next week) and mobile (after February 1), but Microsoft was kind enough to let reporters briefly interact with and view the new Windows 10 experience in the meantime. Above are a few photographs with observations sprinkled without, but stay tuned for more in-depth reviews and analysis on Redmond's latest initiatives. -- Ars Technica.

Is there an iPhone storage crunch coming? These stats say yes.

Is there an iPhone storage crunch coming? These stats say yes.

Apple's refusal to upgrade the cheapest iPhone to 16GB could be leading to a crisis, and these stats just might prove it.

When the iPhone 6 came out, Apple (un)pleasantly surprised everyone by only upgrading two of the three storage options: While the baseline iPhone 6 stayed at a meager 16GB of storage, the middle and high-end storage options were upgraded to 64GB and 128GB respectively. -- Cult of Mac.

Digital Music: Can You Hear Above 16-bit/44.1kHz?

Digital Music: Can You Hear Above 16-bit/44.1kHz?

Dave Hamilton walks right into the line of fire today, detailing and explaining the differences between 16-bit and 24-bit audio bit depths, as well those between sample rates of 44.1kHz and 192kHz. Like The Beatles said about love, Dave says about 16-bits: it's all you need. -- The Mac Observer.

Mac Owners Should Hold Off on New Samsung T1 Flash SSD

Mac Owners Should Hold Off on New Samsung T1 Flash SSD

On January 20, Samsung announced what appears to be an exceptional new storage product, a one ounce USB 3 external Flash drive, essentially a portable Flash SSD, called the T1. John Martellaro did some testing and explains why Mac owners should defer a decision on this new product until more details are sorted out. -- The Mac Observer.

Security Tip: Verify open Wi-Fi hotspots before using them

Security Tip: Verify open Wi-Fi hotspots before using them

When you connect your Mac to a Wi-Fi hotspot at a cafe, library, or other public location, do you ever double-check to ensure the Wi-Fi hotspot is a legitimate one? Quite often, when you are out and about, it is not uncommon to find a number of open hotspots, that you can easily log on to surf away, and while most of these will be perfectly fine options to use, there is nothing to inform you whether or not the hotspot was set up for nefarious purposes. -- MacIssues.

How The Next Generation Of Botnets Will Exploit Anonymous Networks -- And How To Beat Them

How The Next Generation Of Botnets Will Exploit Anonymous Networks -- And How To Beat Them

Computer scientists are already devising strategies for neutralising the next generation of malicious botnets.

Botnets are computer programs that talk to each other over the internet. Some are entirely benign, like those that control internet chats. But many botnets are entirely malicious, programs that send spam or participate in denial of service attacks and so on. These networks are controlled by individual criminals who use them for nefarious purposes such as generating illicit income or attacking other websites. -- MIT Technology Review.

Why You Should Avoid MacKeeper

Why You Should Avoid MacKeeper

You may have heard of the system maintenance utility MacKeeper, which claims to keep your Mac running smoothly. According to iMore's Peter Cohen, who also works at an independent Apple reseller, MacKeeper is best avoided. Cohen calls out the company's shady marketing tactics, the instability it can introduce to Macs, and how difficult it is to uninstall. -- iMore.

State of the Union press gallery "looks like a damn Apple ad," observes political reporter

State of the Union press gallery

We're used to seeing row upon row of MacBooks at tech press events, but the popularity of Apple's laptop seems equally strong among mainstream journalists. The Huffington Post's senior congressional reporter Michael McAuliff tweeted that the press gallery at last night's State of the Union address "looks like a damn Apple ad." -- 9to5Mac.

The State of the Union on Mac CAD

The State of the Union on Mac CAD

Architosh delivers an update on the state of progress on Mac CAD industries, citing facts, figures, industry player views, and notes on the latest developments in new software products for the industry. -- Architosh.

A Mac tech support handbook

A Mac tech support handbook

I've put together an essential foundation document for Mac users who may sometimes try to help support friends and family. -- Computerworld.

How to share files between OS X user accounts

How to share files between OS X user accounts

In a recent column about making the most of Migration Assistant I made the off-hand remark that it's no big deal to move files from one account on your Mac to another. This caused concern from at least one commenter who considered the process onerous. Given that moving files between accounts isn't entirely clear to everyone, I thought I'd provide the details now. -- Macworld.

Exporting Users from OS X Server for Yosemite

Exporting Users from OS X Server for Yosemite

With the release of OS X Server for Yosemite, Apple retired Workgroup Manager, thus leaving us System Admins no GUI method of exporting users and groups out of the server.

The old Workgroup Manager tool gave us the ability to both export and import users / group records, the Server app can just import users.

But not all is lost. We have a bunch of command line tools that allow us to interact with the user directories. In particular we have the dsexport command. -- Amsys.

Removing Videos From Your iPhoto Library

Removing Videos From Your iPhoto Library

If your iPhoto library is huge, one way you can cut it down is to remove all of the videos and store them elsewhere. But finding and then deleting videos in iPhoto can be tricky. You'll need to create a smart album, and then flag the videos before using a hidden command that moves all flagged items to the trash. -- MacMost.

Reorganizing files in the iTunes Media Folder

Reorganizing files in the iTunes Media Folder

How do I move a group of referenced songs in my iTunes Media Folder from one directory to another directory in the same media folder? Whenever I move them, iTunes keeps putting them back into the original directory. I've found that unchecking the "Keep iTunes Media folder organized" option works temporarily, but once I turn it back on, it moves the songs back. Any ideas? -- iLounge.

How to turn on and edit the Favorites bar in Safari

How to turn on and edit the Favorites bar in Safari

A few weeks ago, I received a panicked call from my sister. "My Favorites are gone! I don't know where they went and I don't know how to get them back." The favorites in question weren't Instagram likes or Twitter stars -- no, her new work Mac had come with its Bookmarks favorites bar disabled.

It's not uncommon to see this in new OS X Yosemite Macs; Safari's default view sports as few buttons and switches as possible, so as to immerse yourself in the Web browsing experience. But it's an easy fix to reenable the Favorites bar and even edit it. -- iMore.

Next OS X/iOS Version Upgrades Should Concentrate On Quality And Stability -- Not Buggy Feature-itis

Next OS X/iOS Version Upgrades Should Concentrate On Quality And Stability -- Not Buggy Feature-itis

On stage at Apple's World Wide Developers' Conference in June 2009, Bertrand Serlet, the company's Senior Vice President of Software Engineering at the time, announced that the forthcoming OS X version 10.6 Snow Leopard would feature "no new features," -- something Mr. Serlet suggested was "unprecedented" in the computing industry. In fact, Snow Leopard did have some new feature content, but Mr. Serlet's point was that the main thrust of the version upgrade was to polish and refine the performance of OS X 10.5 Leopard with bugfixes and some mainly under-the-hood tweaking, rather than adding a raft of new features likely in need of refinement. -- MacPrices.

Get a second number to turn your iPhone or iPad into a business phone

Get a second number to turn your iPhone or iPad into a business phone

When you own a small business, the temptation to hand over a business card with your personal cell number plastered on it is natural. You're merely offering a direct line to the person who can make decisions. Accessibility is a key selling point when touting the advantages of your business over larger corporations. -- Macworld.

Why Hardware Specs Don't Matter Much

Why Hardware Specs Don't Matter Much

A funny thing happened along the way to the 21st century. Thanks to Apple, techno gadget customers began to care less and less about hardware specifications.

Simply put, hardware specs don't matter much these days. Oh, sure, tech reviewers still compare and contrast because numbers are easy, while comparing an operating system or an app's benefits is more subjective. Let's face it. Specifications are nearly dead. -- Mac 360.

Are you addicted to your mobile phone? Take the test

Are you addicted to your mobile phone? Take the test

Text messages, email, social networks, addictive games: our phones are too interesting to leave alone for more than a few minutes. But have you ever wondered exactly how much time you spend on your smartphone? And would you like the answer? -- Telegraph.

January 21 Wednesday's News

 

Google updates Chrome Web browser for iOS with OS X Handoff support, 'material design'

Google updates Chrome Web browser for iOS with OS X Handoff support, 'material design'

With a Tuesday update to its Chrome browser for iOS, Google expanded its new "material design" aesthetic to yet another iOS title, while baking in Handoff support for quick platform switching between iOS and Mac. -- AppleInsider.

Obama talks cybersecurity, but Federal IT system breaches increasing

Obama talks cybersecurity, but Federal IT system breaches increasing

President Barack Obama urged Congress and the American public to embrace cyber security legislation during his State of the Union address Tuesday evening. The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, known as CISPA, was unveiled by Obama a week ago and is controversial because it allows companies to share cyber threat information with the Department of Homeland Security--data that might include their customers' private information. -- Ars Technica.

Blind get sight on demand with new iPhone app

Blind get sight on demand with new iPhone app

Karen Koch Rasmussen navigates life just fine without sight. Developing systems to identify the tangibles in life come to her naturally, from how to stock her canned goods to labeling her music collection so she can listen to which ever genre strikes her.

She even has a strategy for when there's a glitch in her systems, like when a canned item goes in the wrong place. If she grabs tomatoes instead of beans, she may adjust her recipe and roll with the inconvenience.

So when an iPhone app to assist the blind came into her life, thus offering a solution to those occasional challenges, Rasmussen, 26, didn't quite know how to use a set of eyes that were easily at her disposal. -- Cult of Mac.

OS X: How to Merge Calendars

OS X: How to Merge Calendars

Today we're going to go over an often-overlooked feature of the Calendar program: using the import/export feature to merge two calendars into one. This is a great way to clean up your calendar list, because let's face it, not many people need 15 color-coded calendars! We'll give you the skinny here in this Quick Tip. -- The Mac Observer.

Capture Any Audio on a Mac With Audio Hijack 3

Capture Any Audio on a Mac With Audio Hijack 3

Rogue Amoeba today announced the launch of Audio Hijack 3 for Mac, which allows users to record audio from any source, including Skype, Safari, or hardware inputs like microphones. As described by the company, "if it can be heard on Mac OS X, Audio Hijack can record it." -- MacRumors.

'123456' Named 2014's Worst Password of the Year

'123456' Named 2014's Worst Password of the Year

Despite the multitude of password management apps that are available, like 1Password and LastPass, many people continue to use easily guessable words and number strings to protect their sensitive information. -- MacRumors.

Apple Acquires Media Analytics Company Semetric Ahead of Beats Music Relaunch

Apple Acquires Media Analytics Company Semetric Ahead of Beats Music Relaunch

Apple has acquired British media analytics company Semetric and will look to roll in the company's Musicmetric tracking service into its relaunch of Beats Music later this year, reports The Guardian.

9 password manager recommendations for OS X and iOS

9 password manager recommendations for OS X and iOS

Following today's release of the top 25 worst passwords used in 2014, if the passwords you use are among them, or if you are using your same password over and over for your various online services, then you might consider the use of a password manager. These options allow you to create random and unique passwords for services outside of your computer (such as those on Web sites), and then securing them all with one master password. -- MacIssues.

Dropbox will no longer support OS X 10.5 or older starting May 18th

Dropbox will no longer support OS X 10.5 or older starting May 18th

Dropbox has announced through an email to users on older versions of OS X that it will soon be discontinuing support for computers running Leopard or other older versions of the operating system. Users still running anything older than OS X 10.6 will need to upgrade in order to continue using future versions of the Dropbox app. -- 9to5Mac.

How healthy are your iOS 8 Health apps?

How healthy are your iOS 8 Health apps?

Even while we wait on the Apple Watch, thousands of apps that claim to keep you healthy have already been made available since Apple introduced the iOS 8 Health app, but it has been difficult to figure out which apps really help you with your health -- until now... -- Computerworld.

Does Apple's CarPlay match the hype?

Does Apple's CarPlay match the hype?

While it might seem like Apple's much hyped in-vehicle platform has stalled -- with only a Ferrari FF offering CarPlay out of the 30-odd carmakers signed on so far -- you won't have to wait too much longer to test-drive the infotainment technology. -- USA Today.

Tracking Networks and Risks on the iPhone: Available Utilities - More Misses than Hits

Tracking Networks and Risks on the iPhone: Available Utilities - More Misses than Hits

Things have changed considerably since the Post Office was steaming open letters in wartime Liverpool and Alan Turing was one of a team trying to crack Enigma encryption. Their efforts were right, particularly in a time of war; but the lines have become blurred, particularly in the last few years. -- eXtensions.

How to jailbreak your Apple TV: run unofficial apps and software on an Apple TV

How to jailbreak your Apple TV: run unofficial apps and software on an Apple TV

Discover the trick to jailbreaking an Apple TV and install cool apps, services and media players on Apple's media player. Here's how to jailbreak your Apple TV.

The Apple TV is a great media player. With an Apple TV you can play video, music and movies from your iPhone, iPad or direct from the official Apple Store, and you can watch anything on Netflix, if you subscribe to that service.

But a jailbroken Apple TV is a whole different ball game. Once you have jailbreak software running on an Apple TV you can install new apps, services and systems on the Apple TV that make it far more interesting than the device Apple sells. -- Macworld UK.

How To Fix Touch ID Efficiency On iPhone Or iPad The Easy Way

How To Fix Touch ID Efficiency On iPhone Or iPad The Easy Way

Apple's Touch ID fingerprint sensor has been a rousing success since first appearing alongside the iPhone 5s in September of 2013. So much so, in fact, that it has now been added to the iPad line-up, but whilst it's a very smooth, refined bit of kit given its fledgling state, it's not without its flaws. Sometimes, for example, it can struggle to detect the print of the user, which turns an ordinarily streamlined event into a rather tedious, tiresome rigmarole. Thankfully, there's a quick and easy way to retrain your Touch ID and help it to better detect your prints, and here, we'll show you how. -- Redmond Pie.

Former Apple Employee Reveals How He Sneaked The Mac's Iconic Booting Up Sound Onto A Computer

Former Apple Employee Reveals How He Sneaked The Mac's Iconic Booting Up Sound Onto A Computer

Former Apple employee Jim Reekes, the man behind the Mac's famous startup sound -- the noise the computer makes as it's booting up -- has explained in a new interview how a group of company workers sneaked in the audio file without permission from their managers. -- Business Insider.

I Love My iPhone But I'm Going To Whine About It Anyway

I Love My iPhone But I'm Going To Whine About It Anyway

It's the software and service that finally bothered me enough to bring it up. You may know that when you buy an iPhone, you get 60 days of Apple Care bundled in with the purchase price, enough time -- in theory -- to shake out any issues. So, right away I found a couple. And started working with Apple on them. -- Forbes.

The opposite of Apple: A Mac user's weird experience buying a PC laptop

The opposite of Apple: A Mac user's weird experience buying a PC laptop

Like a lot of long-time Mac users, I expect, I had never purchased a PC. I've used a lot of them in the workplace, which is why I use Macs at home. It's not that they don't work, it's just that I don't like them. -- Macworld.

Your Entire PC In a Mouse

Your Entire PC In a Mouse

A Polish software and hardware developer has created a prototype computer which is entirely housed within a mouse. Dubbed the Mouse-Box, it works like a conventional mouse, but contains a processor, flash storage, an HDMI connection, and Wi-Fi connectivity. It is connected to a monitor via the HDMI interface and connects to an Internet connection through standard Wi-Fi. -- MyBroadband.

January 20 Tuesday's News

 

Apple once again alerts iOS 8 app developers to upcoming 64-bit requirement

Apple once again alerts iOS 8 app developers to upcoming 64-bit requirement

Apple on Monday posted a note to the News and Updates section of its Developer website reminding app makers that starting Feb. 1, all new iOS 8 software submitted to the App Store must include 64-bit support. -- AppleInsider.

Apple patents eye-tracking gaze controls for iOS, Mac devices

Apple patents eye-tracking gaze controls for iOS, Mac devices

Apple on Tuesday was granted a patent for an advanced gaze-tracking graphical user interface that could one day see implementation in Macs, iPhones, iPads or even a future version of the Apple TV. -- AppleInsider.

2015 Predictions: It's about the money, stupid!

2015 Predictions: It's about the money, stupid!

It's time, finally, for my long-delayed 2015 predictions. Things just kept changing so fast I had to keep re-writing, but have finally stopped. 2015 will definitely be the Year of Monetization, by which I mean it's the year when the bottom line and showing profits will become a key motivator in almost every market. And while profit -- like beer -- is generally good, it isn't always good for everyone. So here are my 10 predictions in no particular order. -- I, Cringely.

Resetting Your Mac's System Management Controller (SMC)

Resetting Your Mac's System Management Controller (SMC)

Today we're going to cover a troubleshooting step you might need to know about if your Mac won't boot-how to reset the System Management Controller (SMC). The SMC chip handles a bunch of other stuff around the Mac, as well, so it's a great trick to be aware of when you've got weirdness going on. Come on in and read all about it! -- The Mac Observer.

Three Rules for Taking Better Portraits on Your iPhone

Three Rules for Taking Better Portraits on Your iPhone

Want to shoot better portraits with your iPhone? Vern Seward shows you how in this the first of a three part series on taking portraits in this installment of iPhoneography 101. -- The Mac Observer.

Work Continues on iOS 8.1.3 With Retail Employees Receiving Second Beta Seed

Work Continues on iOS 8.1.3 With Retail Employees Receiving Second Beta Seed

Apple is continuing its behind-the-scenes work on the upcoming iOS 8.1.3 update, and as of yesterday, retail employees that have been testing the software received a second iOS 8.1.3 beta, build 12B466, which is six builds newer than the previous seed they received on Wednesday, January 7. -- MacRumors.

Fix Smart folders not showing proper contents in OS X

Fix Smart folders not showing proper contents in OS X

Smart folders in OS X allow you to group files and folders by a number of different criteria, including name, type, size, content, and hundreds of similar attributes that are stored in the files' metadata tags. This feature can be exceptionally convenient; however, there might be times when your smart folders do not work properly, and may show incorrect files, show only a small subset of files, or not show any files at all. -- MacIssues.

Cleaning Up the Mac's Printers List

Cleaning Up the Mac's Printers List

You can remove your former model from the list of available printers in the OS X Print box in your Mac's System Preferences. To get there, go to the Apple menu and select System Preferences, or click the System Preferences icon in the Mac's desktop Dock.

In the System Preferences box, click the Printers & Scanners icon; some older versions of OS X have a Print & Scan icon instead. In the list on the side of the window, select the name of the printer you want to remove and click the minus (-) button underneath. In the confirmation box that appears, click Delete Printer.

OS X itself includes drivers for many printers and can update the software from the App Store when needed. If you installed special software yourself to use with the printer and want to remove it from your system, you should check with the printer's manufacturer for specific instructions. Depending on its maker, your printer may have included its own utility for uninstalling the software or you may have to remove it manually. -- New York Times.

Apple Granted 12 Patents Today covering their Ion-X Glass Strengthening Process and More

Apple Granted 12 Patents Today covering their Ion-X Glass Strengthening Process and More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 12 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today which represents one of the slowest granted patent days in recent years. In this report we cover a single invention relating to strengthening iDevice cover glass. This new process is behind the new Apple Watch and has been branded as Ion-X Glass. -- Patently Apple.

Why Run Linux On Macs?

Why Run Linux On Macs?

Apple has always had attractive and stylish hardware, but there are always some customers opting to run Linux instead of OS X on their Macs. But why? One might think that a polished commercial desktop offering designed for that specific lineup of computers might have less rough edges than a free open source one. Actually there's plenty of motivations to choose otherwise. -- ITWorld.

Researchers Use Siri To Steal Data From iPhones

Researchers Use Siri To Steal Data From iPhones

Using Apple's voice-activated Siri function, security researchers have managed to steal sensitive information from iOS smartphones in a stealthy manner. Luca Caviglione of the National Research Council of Italy and Wojciech Mazurczy of the Warsaw University of Technology warn that malicious actors could use Siri for stealthy data exfiltration by using a method that's based on steganography, the practice of hiding information. Dubbed "iStegSiri" by the researchers, the attack can be effective because it doesn't require the installation of additional software components and it doesn't need the device's alteration. On the other hand, it only works on jailbroken devices and attackers somehow need to be able to intercept the modified Siri traffic. The attack method involves controlling the "shape" of this traffic to embed sensitive data from the device. This covert channel could be used to send credit card numbers, Apple IDs, passwords, and other sensitive information from the phone to the criminal mastermind, researchers said in their paper. -- SecurityWeek.

Next-generation drones will go where you point your iPhone and never crash, says startup

Next-generation drones will go where you point your iPhone and never crash, says startup

Drones are a lot of fun, but making them to exactly what you want them to isn't always easy, and a fair number of them are damaged or destroyed in crashes. Skydio, a startup formed by ex-MIT and Google X engineers, is hoping to change that by turning your iPhone into a 'magic wand' controller, reports TechCrunch.

Apple software quality keeps taking a hammering

Apple software quality keeps taking a hammering

Apple has long enjoyed a reputation of producing perfectly engineered products that worked out of the box without complication. But as the company has become massively large and popular, there are questions about whether it does provide the level of quality that once brought it fame. -- MoneyWatch.

Fixing OS X Install Errors 'can't be verified' and 'error occurred while preparing the installation

Fixing OS X Install Errors 'can't be verified' and 'error occurred while preparing the installation

Two unusual error messages that can occur during the attempted installation of OS X Yosemite are the "This copy of the Install OS X Yosemite application can't be verified. It may have been corrupted or tampered with during downloading" message, or a more vague "An error occurred while preparing the installation. Try running again" error message. Sometimes these can be resolved by simply rebooting and trying to reinstall OS X again (or re-downloading the OS X installer if it was damaged), but if the error messages are persistent, then you may find that modifying the system date of the Mac can be the resolution. -- OS X Daily.

Unlocking Disk Utility's hidden secrets

Unlocking Disk Utility's hidden secrets

One of OS X's most versatile utilities is Disk Utility--a tool not only used for formatting and managing a variety of storage devices, but also employed for fixing damaged volumes and performing the ever-so-common "permissions fix" routine. While these features are relatively apparent, the program does have some often overlooked options that can be useful. -- Macworld.

How to set up your new Mac

How to set up your new Mac

You've bought a Mac for the first time. Now comes the fun part: Getting it out of the box and setting it up. Apple's setup process for first-time Macintosh buyers is pretty straightforward, but there are still a few confusing points. So let's walk through it together. -- iMore.

How to Set Up Your New iPad, iPad Mini

How to Set Up Your New iPad, iPad Mini

Did you get an iPad for the holidays?! You did?!? Well, somebody must really appreciate YOU! The latest additions to Cupertino's flat family are the iPad Air 2 $499.99 at Best Buy and iPad mini 3 $346.00 at Amazon, but whichever model you're rocking under the Christmas tree, you can be assured that it is, without a doubt, among the best slates out there. Not only do Apple's line of tablets feature top-notch hardware specs, but the interface is extremely intuitive. If you've never interacted with an Apple product--or even a tablet--before, you should be able to figure things out, right out of the box. -- PC Magazine.

Get started with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch

Get started with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch

Learn how to set up your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch. Whether this is your first iOS device or you're replacing one, these steps walk you through the Setup Assistant.

If you want to start over at any point while setting up your device, press the Home button. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

A Short Report About Upgrading to a Mac Server

A Short Report About Upgrading to a Mac Server

When I first got online, I didn't pay much thought to whether the server was a Mac, a PC, or a dedicated Linux server. The main reason was that, in those days, Mac web servers were few and far between, and thus not very cost effective. At a time when I could only manage a few dollars a month to have my site hosted, I looked for hosts who had low prices with the promise of high performance. -- The Tech Night Owl.

Easy Mac Hacks: Get the RSS Screensaver Back in Yosemite

Easy Mac Hacks: Get the RSS Screensaver Back in Yosemite

In OS X Tiger, Apple introduced a new screen saver to help show off the new RSS reader abilities in Safari. The RSS visualizer screen saver was designed to read in an RSS feed and display its contents whenever your screen saver would appear. Apple discontinued this screen saver back in Lion, at the same time they stopped including an RSS reader in Safari. For those who would like to reminisce, you can get this screen saver back on your system, and we'll show you how to do it in this article. -- Mac|Life.

iPhone users: How your government spies on you

iPhone users: How your government spies on you

The iPhone is by far the most secure device around. But please don't be complacent, as criminals, governments and criminal governments work really hard to subvert device security, no back door required. -- Computerworld.

Snowden docs give new insight into how GCHQ tracked iPhone users

Snowden docs give new insight into how GCHQ tracked iPhone users

New documents by NSA leaker Edward Snowden were published this weekend by German newspaper Der Spiegel, giving us new insight into how the GCHQ tracked iPhone users without their consent. -- iDownload Blog.

Dating apps found 'leaking' location data

Dating apps found 'leaking' location data

Many mobile dating apps can be hacked to expose the exact location of users, warn security experts.

The vulnerability might leave users open to stalking, harassment or persecution, said the researchers.

By spoofing requests to the servers behind the apps, researchers were able to track people as they moved around during the day. -- BBC.

Exchange text messages between two iPhones with no cellular data plan

Exchange text messages between two iPhones with no cellular data plan

My wife and I both have iPhones, although hers doesn't actually have a plan on it -- she basically just uses it over Wi-Fi when she's at home. I'm wondering if there's some way we can exchange text messages when I'm away from home. My iPhone has a normal voice plan, but I don't pay for data as I'm near Wi-Fi often enough. I tried sending a text from her iPhone to mine, but it seems to shows up on both iPhones as if it's from me. I should also probably mention that we're using the same Apple ID on both devices as we share iTunes purchases, calendars, and contacts. Can this be done? I'd appreciate any advice you can give me. -- iLounge.

How to Set Speakerphone Mode to Automatically Activate on iPhone Calls

How to Set Speakerphone Mode to Automatically Activate on iPhone Calls

By default, all calls on the iPhone will play audio through the standard earpiece at the top of the phone, and if someone wishes to use speakerphone they enable it manually by tapping on the "Speaker" button during an active call. While that may be the desired effect for most users, in various situations some users may wish to receive and make all phone calls with speakerphone activated automatically, without having to manually enable it every time by pressing the Speaker button. -- OS X Daily.

How to setup and use action extensions on iPhone and iPad

How to setup and use action extensions on iPhone and iPad

Action extensions, part of extensibility, let apps share their functionality with other apps. For example, you can use a 1Password action extension to login to your Twitter account from inside Tweetbot. You can use a Bing action extension to translate a web page inside Safari. You can use a PDF Expert extension to turn an article into a document. You can even use an app like Workflow to create your own, custom action extensions. All you have to do is turn them on, set them up the way you like, and then put them to use! -- iMore.

Regular Exercise Not Enough To Make Up For Sitting All Day

Regular Exercise Not Enough To Make Up For Sitting All Day

Toronto researchers have found the amount of time a person sits during the day is associated with a higher risk of disease and death, regardless of regular exercise. The paper, published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine (abstract), found that prolonged sedentary behavior was associated with a 15 to 20 per cent higher risk of death from any cause; a 15 to 20 per cent higher risk of heart disease, death from heart disease, cancer, death from cancer; and as much as a 90 per cent increased risk of developing diabetes, said Alter. And that was after adjusting for the effects of regular exercise. ... Engaging in 30 to 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous daily exercise does not mean it's OK to then "sit on your rear" for the rest of the day. -- Los Angeles Times.