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August 28Thursday's News

 

Apple announces Sept. 9 event for 'iPhone 6s,' updated Apple TV at massive new venue

Apple announces Sept. 9 event for 'iPhone 6s,' updated Apple TV at massive new venue

Apple on Thursday sent out invitations to members of the media, making official its anticipated Sept. 9 event at San Francisco's Bill Graham Civic Auditorium. It's expected to showcase not only a next-generation "iPhone 6s" handset, but also a new Siri-enabled Apple TV set-top box. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's customer service suffers in Q2, study says

Apple's customer service suffers in Q2, study says

A study from market research firm StellaService published this week seemingly reveals a rapid decline in Apple's customer service capabilities, from a slight slip in shipping fulfillment to longer wait times for online and phone support. -- AppleInsider.

Google offers 'short term fix' to help ad publishers bypass Apple's iOS 9 security protocol

Google offers 'short term fix' to help ad publishers bypass Apple's iOS 9 security protocol

Google on Thursday informed developers of a five-line bit of code crafted to sidestep Apple's upcoming App Transport Security encryption feature in iOS 9 by creating HTTPS exceptions, which could in some cases block mobile ads from appearing. -- AppleInsider.

LTE over Wi-Fi spectrum sets up industry-wide fight over interference

LTE over Wi-Fi spectrum sets up industry-wide fight over interference

A plan to use Wi-Fi airwaves for cellular service has sparked concerns about interference with existing Wi-Fi networks, causing a fight involving wireless carriers, cable companies, a Wi-Fi industry trade group, Microsoft, and network equipment makers. -- Ars Technica.

How to fix weird 'talagent' keychain issue

How to fix weird 'talagent' keychain issue

Are you getting something like following message on your Mac every time you log in?

talagent wants to use the "local items" keychain. please log in with password.

If so, you're in luck, because we have a fix. Here's how to get this utterly annoying pop-up out of your face. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple's iPhone 6s event will blow up the Internet

Apple's iPhone 6s event will blow up the Internet

Just how big is Apple's next product reveal going to be? All signs point to it being a massive blowout of an event -- far bigger than the standard iPhone "s" upgrade the world is expecting.

Could we finally be getting the long-rumored iPad Pro in addition to the iPhone 6s? Or the even more unicorn-like Apple TV set? Maybe a Dr. Dre performance of his new album Compton or a stateside version of the Apple Music Festival? -- Cult of Mac.

Confirmed: Apple Retiring 'One to One' to Focus on Free Workshops

Confirmed: Apple Retiring 'One to One' to Focus on Free Workshops

MacRumors recently learned that Apple's One to One training program for Mac, iPhone and iPad may be coming to an end soon, and we can now confirm that Apple Stores are holding meetings with retail employees about phasing out the membership-based service, which has been available under its current name since May 2007. One to One members should be informed about the changes in the near future. -- MacRumors.

How to prepare your Mac for OS X 10.11 'El Capitan'

How to prepare your Mac for OS X 10.11 'El Capitan'

Apple's OS X El Capitan is slated for release in fall, and with this season right around the corner, the OS will soon be available for those who wish to install it. While it is largely similar to OS X Yosemite, El Capitan does include a number of improvements that should enhance both your workflow and the overall snappiness of the OS. These alone may be good reasons to upgrade, but as with any upgrade or update, there is always a chance that something may go wrong when you install it, so it is good to take a few steps to help prevent this. -- MacIssues.

Tech Fix: Untangling the Mysteries of Personal Technology

PERSONAL TECH:Untangling the Mysteries of Personal Technology

The New York Times is starting Tech Fix, a regular feature in which we will try to make personal technology less frustrating by examining the causes of problems, using data, reporting and analysis to come up with the best solutions. -- New York Times.

The Art of the Out-of-Office Reply

The Art of the Out-of-Office Reply

It's August, and vacationers' email auto-responses are coming in left and right. From the poetic missive to a simple "nope," saying you're not working has become its own art form. -- New York Times.

Apple's Latest Invention Focuses on Voice Quality Associated with a New Wireless Headset

Apple's Latest Invention Focuses on Voice Quality Associated with a New Wireless Headset

Last week Patently Apple posted a report titled "To shake things Up, Apple may Add Cellular Voice Capabilities to the iPad via a new Wireless headset." Apple's patent revealed they're seriousness in providing the iPhone with a next-gen wireless headset that supports Voice over LTE or VoLTE and better yet, bringing voice calls to the iPad and MacBooks via a wireless headset. Today, Apple continues on that same theme by focusing on improved voice quality in a wireless headset that could be used for telephony on Apple's desktops and mobile devices including MacBooks, iPhones and iPads. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Reveals Force Touch for the iPad, Magic Mouse & Beyond

Apple Reveals Force Touch for the iPad, Magic Mouse & Beyond

Last week Patently Apple posted a patent report titled "An Advanced Force Touch Patent for the iPad Surfaces in Europe." Today the U.S. Patent Office published a patent application from Apple that expands upon the foundation that was laid out last week. Apple's patent reveals that their 2-layer force-sensitive films will apply to a wide range of devices including the iPad, wearables, keyboards, the magic mouse and beyond. While it's a surety that Apple's Force Touch is coming to the iPhone 6s in a few weeks, we know that Apple is likely to bring this feature to the iPad as this invention reveals. The timing of course isn't known at this moment but we can assume it will arrive in the next year or so as Apple expands Force Touch across more products. -- Patently Apple.

Workflow iOS automation app puts its Today widget to work in latest version

Workflow iOS automation app puts its Today widget to work in latest version

Workflow for iOS has become the go-to automation tool for iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch users wanting to streamline actions on mobile devices, and now the latest version is ready to put its useful Today widget in Notification Center to work. -- 9to5Mac.

Google Chrome to Silence Annoying Auto-Play Videos

Google Chrome to Silence Annoying Auto-Play Videos

Ever open a site in a new browser tab expecting to check it out when you have a free minute? Of course you have.

How annoying is it when that site happens to have a video or ad on it that starts playing automatically? Now you have to stop what you're doing and go over to that tab just to shut up the dang video.

Fortunately, this shouldn't be an issue with Google Chrome anymore. -- PC Magazine.

Stop ad injections with HTTPS connections or a VPN

Stop ad injections with HTTPS connections or a VPN

You already knew that secure web connections prevent snooping by criminals and others on points between you and a server. But they also keep networks from injecting advertising. -- Macworld.

How to find Photos' image files in the Finder: Where does Photos for OS X stash pictures?

How to find Photos' image files in the Finder: Where does Photos for OS X stash pictures?

Peter Philpott wonders how to access his media files in Photos for OS X: "In iPhoto, I could right-click on a photo and get it to reveal the original in the Finder." Photos has an option when you right-click media, as well as in the File menu, labeled Show Referenced File in Finder--but it's grayed out for him on the images with which he attempts this. -- Macworld.

OS X El Capitan: Mute all tabs in Safari

OS X El Capitan: Mute all tabs in Safari

Have you ever loaded a Web page only to find that it has an auto-play video or some other obnoxious, sound generating annoyance? Well now there's a way to immediately silence all of the tabs you have open in Safari in OS X El Capitan.

In this tip I'll show you how to quickly mute all tabs in Safari in OS X El Capitan. And I'll also show you how to mute individual tabs, and how you can mute all other tabs except the one you want to hear. -- CIO.

Pondering a name change for OS X

Pondering a name change for OS X

Back in May I made a modest proposal for Apple to change OS X back to Mac OS and abandon the X once and for all. It was a plea, not a prediction--which is a good thing, because it didn't happen.

Then again, we've got another year before iOS 9 and OS X meet like gunfighters crossing paths in an old west town at high, er, ten. It could still happen.

But since I wrote that column, I've heard from a lot of people who have coalesced around a different concept for the future of how Apple's platforms are labeled. And at the Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) in San Francisco, we got a few clues about what Apple might be thinking.

So let's play the name game! -- Macworld.

How to sell your iPhone on Craigslist like a pro

How to sell your iPhone on Craigslist like a pro

As many of you guys know, I'm sort of a Craigslist junkie. I have sold literally hundreds of items on Craigslist over the years, and I can't remember ever having any big problems with a transaction.

Since the new iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus is only a couple of weeks away, many people are now interested in selling their current iPhone in order to finance the new iPhone. This is a smart move, as value of the last generation phones will dip and continue to do so once the new iPhones come out. -- iDownload Blog.

August 27Thursday's News

 

Facebook launches 'M' virtual assistant driven by both human and artificial intelligence

Facebook launches 'M' virtual assistant driven by both human and artificial intelligence

Facebook on Wednesday launched "M," a text-based virtual assistant integrated with Facebook Messenger that unlike Siri, Cortana, or Google Now relies on both human and artificial intelligence to fulfill requests. -- AppleInsider.

Apple researching wireless earphones with bone conduction noise cancelling tech

Apple researching wireless earphones with bone conduction noise cancelling tech

According to a patent application published on Thursday, Apple is looking into advanced bone conduction technology that would enhance voice communications in an unannounced wireless earphone system. -- AppleInsider.

Swipe your way to iOS 9's suggested contacts

Swipe your way to iOS 9's suggested contacts

iOS 8 introduced the idea of showing your most-contacted contacts in the multitasking screen. You'd simply double click on the Home button to see the list of the most recent apps as well as a row of the folks you contacted the most across the top.

If you're looking for that feature in iOS 9, you might have noticed that the contacts are no longer in the multitasking screen. Never fear, though, they've just moved. -- Cult of Mac.

iOS 9 Beta: Extra Security with a 6-Digit Passcode

iOS 9 Beta: Extra Security with a 6-Digit Passcode

The beta of iOS 9 is just a goldmine of fun new stuff to mess around with, but in this Quick Tip, we're going to go over something serious: an easy new way to improve the security of your device without much inconvenience. Setting up a six-digit passcode and thwarting thieves is what Melissa Holt's got for us today. -- The Mac Observer.

When (and When Not) to Replace Your Old Mac

When (and When Not) to Replace Your Old Mac

A reader recently asked Dr. Mac how long he could expect his Mac to last. You might be surprised at his response. -- The Mac Observer.

Take Your Bluetooth Device Management in OS X to the Next Level with the Option Key

Take Your Bluetooth Device Management in OS X to the Next Level with the Option Key

The Option key is one of the coolest shortcut modifiers in OS X, revealing handy and awesome information and capabilities throughout the operating system. But here's one place where the Option key's impact is relatively unknown: the Bluetooth menu. -- The Mac Observer.

OS X: El Capitan's Deletion of "Repair Disk Permissions" Could Impact You

OS X: El Capitan's Deletion of

Apple's next version of OS X El Capitan uses something called "System Integrity Protection" to prevent the alteration of critical system files. As a result, scripted installers and even privileged users can no longer change those UNIX file permissions and then modify them. This should make El Capitan more stable and secure. So, while "Repair Disk Permissions" is gone, that also creates an important issue for users: software upgrades. -- The Mac Observer.

How to Schedule a Genius Bar Appointment Via Apple's Webpage

How to Schedule a Genius Bar Appointment Via Apple's Webpage

Scheduling a Genius Bar appointment is a snap using the Apple Store App. However, what can you do if the device with your app on it is what you need help with? Kelly shows you how to set up that appointment using Apple's website. -- The Mac Observer.

Dozens of Projects That Let You Do Real Science on Your Mac

Dozens of Projects That Let You Do Real Science on Your Mac

Macs (and of course PCs with Linux or Windows) can be powerful tools when their collective computing capacity is aggregated on a network. If you're interested in exploring how you can contribute to important science causes with that Mac sitting on your desk, here are dozens of projects that could benefit from the gigaflops of computational power that you're currently using for kitten videos. -- The Mac Observer.

Back-to-School Apps for the Organized Student

Back-to-School Apps for the Organized Student

Students enjoying their last days of summer break have the threat of back-to-school time hanging over their heads, like the sword of Damocles. If that Damocles reference has you confused, why not look up the ancient story using the Google app? Then continue reading this column to discover other apps that can help students with their studies and make the back-to-school transition smoother. -- New York Times.

Joseph Traub, Who Helped Bring Computer Science to Universities, Dies at 83

Joseph Traub, Who Helped Bring Computer Science to Universities, Dies at 83

Mr. Traub, who founded the computer science department at Columbia, helped the emerging academic discipline garner respectability and resources. -- New York Times.

Apple to lead the way for Next-Gen Low Powered Oxide TFT Panels in iPad Pro & other Mac Products

Apple to lead the way for Next-Gen Low Powered Oxide TFT Panels in iPad Pro & other Mac Products

A technical report released this week in Asia noted that Oxide (Oxide semiconductor) TFT display, which its strengths are low-power design and miniaturization, is rapidly expanding its influence in the market. The report specifically stated that "As Apple is planning to release iPad Pro that has Oxide TFT Panel soon, it seems that it will make a sudden rise as next generation panel along with Low-Temperature Poly Silicon (LTPS) TFT." -- Patently Apple.

The 20 Most Infamous Cyberattacks of the 21st Century (Part I)

The 20 Most Infamous Cyberattacks of the 21st Century (Part I)

The cyberworld is a dangerous place. But just how dangerous is hard to gauge. Today, Tavish Vaidya at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., discusses the most egregious attacks of the 21st century and concludes that the trend is increasing sharply. In a two-part post, here are 20 of the most infamous attacks his paper discusses. -- MIT Technology Review.

The 20 Most Infamous Cyberattacks of the 21st Century (Part II)

The 20 Most Infamous Cyberattacks of the 21st Century (Part II)

Tavish Vaidya at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., has been studying trends in cyberattacks that have occurred since 2000. His conclusion is that they are on the increase and that precautions must be taken to secure important data as a matter of urgency. -- MIT Technology Review.

Apple Advances their Work on Wireless Charging Systems Focused on Rapid Power Delivery

Apple Advances their Work on Wireless Charging Systems Focused on Rapid Power Delivery

Apple revealed details of a highly sophisticated wireless charging system back in 2013 that utilizes near field magnetic resonance (NFMR) power supply. It's likely the long term approach that Apple will eventually introduce. Today a new patent application was published by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office that reveals an Apple invention relating to impedance matching for inductive power transfer systems. With Samsung having wireless charging available for their smartphone line, it would definitely be nice to see such an option for Apple's iDevices in the not-too-distant future in one form or another. -- Patently Apple.

Many Drivers Never Use In-Vehicle Tech, Don't Want Apple Or Google In Next Car

Many Drivers Never Use In-Vehicle Tech, Don't Want Apple Or Google In Next Car

Many of the high-tech features automakers believe owners want in their vehicles are not only not being used by them, but they don't want them in their next vehicle, according to a new survey by J.D. Power.

According to J.D. Power's 2015 Driver Interactive Vehicle Experience (DrIVE) Report, 20% of new-vehicle owners have never used 16 of 33 of the latest technology features.

The five features owners most commonly report that they "never use" are in-vehicle concierge (43%); mobile routers (38%); automatic parking systems (35%); heads-up display (33%); and built-in apps (32%).

Additionally, there are 14 technology features that 20% or more of owners don't even want in their next vehicle. Those features include Apple CarPlay and Google Android Auto, in-vehicle concierge services and in-vehicle voice texting.

When narrowed to just Gen Years, the number of vehicle owners who don't want entertainment and connectivity systems increases to 23%. -- Computer World.

How to Back Up Your iTunes Media

How to Back Up Your iTunes Media

All your files are important, and I'd strongly recommend backing up everything. Some of you may back up your documents, but it's best not to ignore an important part of your Mac's files: Your iTunes media. -- Intego.

How to stop autoplay videos

How to stop autoplay videos

I sympathize. We all deal with this annoyance. In fact, I'm willing to bet that everyone reading this article who hasn't already solved this problem knows exactly what I'm talking about.

Most of these videos run on Shockwave Flash, so I'm going to concentrate on that technology. The trick isn't to block Flash entirely, but to make it work only with your permission. -- PCWorld.

August 26Wednesday's News

 

VMware launches Fusion 8 with Windows 10 & OS X El Capitan support

VMware launches Fusion 8 with Windows 10 & OS X El Capitan support

VMware on Tuesday launched Fusion 8, an updated version of its virtualization tool for Mac users who want to run Windows -- or other operating systems -- without having to boot into the other OS. -- AppleInsider.

Apple releases Logic Pro X 10.2, MainStage 3.2 updates with Alchemy synthesizer

Apple releases Logic Pro X 10.2, MainStage 3.2 updates with Alchemy synthesizer

Apple on Tuesday released updates of Logic Pro X and MainStage 3, both of which include support for Alchemy, a synthesizer plugin acquired through the company's takeover of Camel Audio in February. -- AppleInsider.

Apple redesigns Workshops scheduling system in minor website update

Apple redesigns Workshops scheduling system in minor website update

Apple on Tuesday rolled out a small change to its newly integrated website, allowing customers to easily browse and schedule Workshop appointments with in-store staff at participating brick-and-mortar stores. -- AppleInsider.

UK surveillance "worse than 1984," says new UN privacy chief

UK surveillance

The newly appointed UN special rapporteur on privacy, Joseph Cannataci, has called the UK's oversight of surveillance "a rather bad joke at its citizens' expense," and said that the situation regarding privacy is "worse" than anything George Orwell imagined in his novel 1984. Speaking to The Guardian, Cannataci said: "at least Winston [a character in Orwell's 1984] was able to go out in the countryside and go under a tree and expect there wouldn't be any screen, as it was called. Whereas today there are many parts of the English countryside where there are more cameras than George Orwell could ever have imagined. So the situation in some cases is far worse already." -- Ars Technica.

How security flaws work: the buffer overflow

How security flaws work: the buffer overflow

The buffer overflow has long been a feature of the computer security landscape. In fact the first self-propagating Internet worm--1988's Morris Worm--used a buffer overflow in the Unix finger daemon to spread from machine to machine. Twenty-seven years later, buffer overflows remain a source of problems. Windows infamously revamped its security focus after two buffer overflow-driven exploits in the early 2000s. And just this May, a buffer overflow found in a Linux driver left (potentially) millions of home and small office routers vulnerable to attack. -- Ars Technica.

(Much) Bigger than Hollywood

(Much) Bigger than Hollywood

Eddy Cue seems like a nice guy. I can't say that for sure as I've never met him, but he seems to be amiable enough. Maybe it's because he has a seat on Ferrari's board of directors. Maybe it's because he enjoys dancing.

Or maybe it's because he's in charge of the only real "division" at Apple. All the other senior managers have functional roles. Eddy has a bona-fide business unit called Services. -- Asymco.

The quickest way to find images with iOS 9

The quickest way to find images with iOS 9

In previous versions of iOS, finding your photos was a bit tricky, especially as you started to amass them in the thousands, what with having a high-quality camera in your pocket at all times.

In iOS 9, currently in public beta, the Photos app has gotten a new way to find the photo you're looking for amidst the haystack of your Photo Roll. Here's how to use this new feature. -- Cult of Mac.

Parallels Desktop 11 versus VMware Fusion 8

Parallels Desktop 11 versus VMware Fusion 8

Parallels Desktop 11 came out last week, and VMware Fusion 8 hit store shelves today. TekRevue's Jim Tanous and John Martellaro join Jeff Gamet to compare the two virtual machine environments, plus John has a tip on fixing the missing sunrise and sunset display on your Apple Watch. -- The Mac Observer.

How Not to Waste Your Time With the iPhone 6 Plus Camera Replacement Program

How Not to Waste Your Time With the iPhone 6 Plus Camera Replacement Program

If your iPhone has a serial number that qualifies it for Apple's iSight Camera Replacement Program for iPhone 6 Plus, Dr. Mac has first-hand advice that may save you from wasting hours. -- The Mac Observer.

How to Create Colored Backgrounds for Playlists, Albums in iTunes 12

How to Create Colored Backgrounds for Playlists, Albums in iTunes 12

There's nothing more boring than black text on a white background when listening to music. iTunes 12 allows you to turn on colored backgrounds for open albums, movies and playlists. Unfortunately, the color chosen isn't up to you. -- The Mac Observer.

What can you do with Apple's new Force-Touch trackpad?

What can you do with Apple's new Force-Touch trackpad?

If you recently purchased a MacBook that has Apple's new Force-Touch trackpad, then as with any new system you might have played around with the trackpad's features for a little while, and then settled into only using more generic functions like pointing and clicking. This may be especially true if you are a long-standing Mac user and have become accustomed to the previous multi-touch trackpad's features. However, by keeping a couple of ideas in mind, you can make the best use of your Mac's new trackpad. -- MacIssues.

Apple Granted 45 Patents Covering Several Apple Watch Design Wins, Touch ID & NFC

Apple Granted 45 Patents Covering Several Apple Watch Design Wins, Touch ID & NFC

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 45 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover several Apple Watch design patents along with patents covering NFC and Touch ID. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Touchpad Has 20,000 Sensors and Can Interpret 16 Touches at Once

Touchpad Has 20,000 Sensors and Can Interpret 16 Touches at Once

Startup makes a touch- and force-sensitive surface that can transform itself into a piano or a painting canvas.

A startup is building a force- and touch-sensitive pad the size of a small tablet computer to serve as your next drum machine, QWERTY keyboard, painting canvas, or something else entirely. -- MIT Technology Review.

Microsoft Says Programmable Chips Will Make AI Software Smarter

Microsoft Says Programmable Chips Will Make AI Software Smarter

A new approach to powering AI software could produce artificial neural networks of "unprecedented size," says Microsoft.

Recent breakthroughs in how accurately software can recognize images and speech came thanks to additional computing power behind a technique known as deep learning. Microsoft now reports progress on an idea that could put even greater muscle behind the technique. A practical way to power up deep learning software even more could lead to further significant advances in the intelligence of machines. -- MIT Technology Review.

The Best Online Backup Service

Joe Kissell Finds the Best Online Backup Service

TidBITS' Joe Kissell teamed up with review site The Wirecutter to definitively discover the best online backup service. In this exhaustive guide, Joe covers what you should look for, how each service performs, how to set them up, and how to restore your files. Joe's top pick is former TidBITS sponsor CrashPlan, with competing service Backblaze as the runner-up. -- The Wirecutte.

Solve Wi-Fi Coverage Problems with WiFi Explorer and NetSpot

Solve Wi-Fi Coverage Problems with WiFi Explorer and NetSpot

Two OS X tools for surveying Wi-Fi signals can help you visually sort out what's causing interference and better plan placing or moving access points for optimal signal coverage. -- TidBITS.

How To Safely prepare + wipe your iPhone for resale or trade-in

How To Safely prepare + wipe your iPhone for resale or trade-in

If you're thinking of selling or trading in your current iPhone ahead of the iPhone 6S's release, you probably know that you'll need to wipe your device before a buyer can use it free and clear. Prepping an iPhone for resale used to be almost as easy as hitting a "reset" button in the iPhone's settings menu. But over the past few years, the process has become more complex thanks to new security, wallet, and cloud-dependent features such as Activation Lock, Apple Pay and iTunes in the Cloud. Completely removing all of your personal items from your iPhone -- and your iPhone from Apple's servers -- requires extra work.

Today, I'm going to walk you through the process of thoroughly scrubbing your iPhone prior to resale. There are 8 steps to take to make sure your device is cleaned up and ready to sell to its next owner. -- 9to5Mac.

Another way to bypass the ad blocker in iOS 9 Safari for sites you want to support

Another way to bypass the ad blocker in iOS 9 Safari for sites you want to support

As I mentioned back in June, the 'content blocker' (read: ad blocker) feature of Safari in iOS 9 poses a big threat to free, ad-supported sites like this one. No ad revenue equals no money to pay for such luxuries as servers and writers.

Whitelisting the sites you want to support is the easy option, but John Gruber noticed a reference in the Finer Tech blog to an alternative approach you can use on the fly. -- 9to5Mac.

Server hijinks: Setting up your own VPN on OS X

Server hijinks: Setting up your own VPN on OS X

In the midst of my many travels, I decided it would, of course, be the perfect time to do some maintenance on my home server.

The server is a Mac mini that's set up for a few different things: It holds my entire photo library, works as a media center, keeps a copy of all my digital music, archives old files going back a decade or more, and fulfills some server tasks. -- Six Colors.

How to start fresh with a new user account: Remove the cruft of years with a clean install of OS X

How to start fresh with a new user account: Remove the cruft of years with a clean install of OS X

Running the OS X upgrade process (as opposed to doing clean installs) and using Migration Assistant to move accounts to new machines both have worked fairly well for me. But over a period of 12 years, some unwanted baggage can accumulate, and that user account you rely on can get little temperamental. How does a computer with a more than a decade-old user account express its temperament? It's slow. It lets you rename the computer in the Sharing Preferences pane but doesn't change the name in the Terminal. It refuses to let you connect via screen sharing. It takes two tries to reboot it. It's generally just surly and difficult.

Enough was enough. It was time to start over with a fresh install. -- Macworld.

Apple's Plan to Destroy the Large Cable Bundle

Apple's Plan to Destroy the Large Cable Bundle

The cable bundle is misunderstood. While analysts and pundits focus on when the cable bundle will finally succumb to Netflix, HBO, and Hulu, the reality is the future of television will be built on the video bundle's back. Due to attractive economics, video bundles are one of the best values in the media space and will remain the dominant way we receive premium video content. We are quickly approaching the point where Apple can capitalize on market dislocation to destroy the modern-day big cable bundle with a leaner bundle that is built to thrive in a mobile world. -- Above Avalon.

10 things that iTunes does right

10 things that iTunes does right

iTunes gets a lot of criticism, including a lot that I dish out, and much of this criticism is justified. iTunes has lots of problems syncing iOS devices, iTunes Match and iCloud Music Library are confusing, and the interface, particularly in iTunes 12, is confusing.

To be fair, though, iTunes does get a lot right. You can condemn it for many problems, but it's good to sometimes take a step back and give it credit for the features that work so well that you hardly pay attention to them. I've picked ten things that iTunes does right. -- Macworld.

Hey Cortana, why can't I use Siri on a Mac?

Hey Cortana, why can't I use Siri on a Mac?

Am I the only person who doesn't' understand why Microsoft's Cortana has (sort of) beaten Siri to arrive on the Mac platform? It just seems such a lost opportunity.

Cortana doesn't even need to run natively on the Mac -- you must install Parallels Desktop for Mac 11,(c.$79.95) to run Windows 10 natively on a Mac. Once you install Windows in this then Microsoft's Cortana assistant is available across both Mac and Windows. -- Computerworld.

Even in a 2007 Mac mini, an SSD Is Fast

Even in a 2007 Mac mini, an SSD Is Fast

We came home from vacation three weeks ago, and my Mid 2007 Mac mini began giving me problems almost from the moment I powered it up. The 320 GB 7200 rpm internal hard drive was having issues, and after looking at prices, I decided that SSD could be the way to go. -- Low End Mac.

Sometime's I'm terrified' of the Internet of Things, says father of the Internet

Sometime's I'm terrified' of the Internet of Things, says father of the Internet

Vint Cerf is known as a "father of the Internet," and like any good parent, he worries about his offspring -- most recently, the IoT.

"Sometimes I'm terrified by it," he said in a news briefing Monday at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum in Germany. "It's a combination of appliances and software, and I'm always nervous about software -- software has bugs." -- IDG News Service.

VHS Camcorder -- Recording The Old School On iOS

VHS Camcorder -- Recording The Old School On iOS

Camera technology has come a long way, and yet the style of the past still has its own appeal. The new app VHS Camcorder uses the powerful camera on your iPhone to give you VHS style results complete with time stamp and scan lines. The developers have gone above and beyond to replicate the look of classic VHS footage coupled with a 4:3 aspect ratio to allow for old time buttons on the sides of the footage. There's a big push for HD video recording, and yet VHS Camcorder shows the appeal of the past, and the new creative potential. -- Apple'n'Apps .

How to block phone numbers on your iPhone

How to block phone numbers on your iPhone

Recently, I began receiving annoying texts from a "mystery shopping" company asking me to do some work for them. I smelled something fishy, so when they kept texting me, I decided it was time to block their number on my iPhone. You may have a number you'd like to block, as well. If so, here's how. -- Apple World Today.

The Power Mac G5 is one of Apple's best designs: Crack open Apple's classic tower and behold the attention to detail

The Power Mac G5 is one of Apple's best designs: Crack open Apple's classic tower and behold the attention to detail

If we're honest, the thing that makes many of us become Mac users in the first place is how the hardware looks. But for many, the thing that keeps us Mac users is that over the months and years of owning them we discover again and again that Apple has taken the time to think through and implement details that most wouldn't even have thought to identify as problems that need to be solved. To draw a clumsy and unromantic analogy, it's the difference between the first flush of lust and wonderment that attracts you to your partner, and how, over the months and years together, you discover that in a thousand tiny ways they're far more beguiling and complex and glorious than you ever realized when you met. -- Macworld.

The Case For Teaching Ignorance

The Case For Teaching Ignorance

In the mid-1980s, a University of Arizona surgery professor, Marlys H. Witte, proposed teaching a class entitled "Introduction to Medical and Other Ignorance." Far too often, she believed, teachers fail to emphasize how much about a given topic is unknown. "Textbooks spend 8 to 10 pages on pancreatic cancer," said Witte, "without ever telling the student that we just don't know very much about it." Now Jamie Holmes writes in the NY Times that many scientific facts simply aren't solid and immutable, but are instead destined to be vigorously challenged and revised by successive generations. According to Homes, presenting ignorance as less extensive than it is, knowledge as more solid and more stable, and discovery as neater also leads students to misunderstand the interplay between answers and questions. -- New York Times.

August 25Tuesday's News

 

Apple CEO Tim Cook talks ConnectED education program on Good Morning America

Apple CEO Tim Cook talks ConnectED education program on Good Morning America

Apple chief Tim Cook made a brief appearance on ABC's Good Morning America on Monday, discussing the company's participation in the White House's ConnectED educational program. -- AppleInsider.

British firm builds experimental iPhone 6 with hydrogen fuel cell

British firm builds experimental iPhone 6 with hydrogen fuel cell

A British company called Intelligent Energy has reportedly built a working version of an iPhone 6 that integrates both a rechargeable battery and a hydrogen fuel cell without altering the dimensions of the device. -- AppleInsider.

Apple Stores may end 'One to One' training sessions in near future, report claims

Apple Stores may end 'One to One' training sessions in near future, report claims

Apple is on the verge of phasing out its "One to One" training sessions for Apple Store customers, aiming to direct people into free, open workshops instead, a report said on Monday. -- AppleInsider.

Apple issues sixth Xcode 7 beta to developers with minor bug fixes

Apple issues sixth Xcode 7 beta to developers with minor bug fixes

Apple on Monday released to developers the sixth beta version of its upcoming Xcode 7 coding tool with support for watchOS 2.0 beta, OS X 10.11 beta, and iOS 9 beta 5 SDKs. -- AppleInsider.

Reflective satellites may be the future of high-end encryption

Reflective satellites may be the future of high-end encryption

Quantum key distribution is regularly touted as the encryption of the future. While the keys are exchanged on an insecure channel, the laws of physics provide a guarantee that two parties can exchange a secret key without knowing whether they're being overheard. This unencrypted-but-secure form of key exchange circumvents one of the potential shortcomings of some forms of public key systems. -- Ars Technica.

How to fix battery life issues in iOS 8.4.1

How to fix battery life issues in iOS 8.4.1

iOS 8.4.1 might have fine-tuned Apple Music, but some users are complaining about about battery issues after updating to Apple's latest mobile operating system.

If you're afflicted, the good news is that iOS 9 is right around the corner. The bad news? That doesn't help you now, and iOS 9 will likely have its own host of bugs that Apple needs to address. Here are some tips to help you eke out as much battery life in iOS 8.4.1 as possible. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Stops Signing iOS 8.4

Apple Stops Signing iOS 8.4

Apple has stopped signing iOS 8.4 for compatible iPhone, iPad and iPod touch models, meaning that users can no longer upgrade or downgrade to that version using iTunes. Apple is now signing iOS 8.4.1 and later only. -- MacRumors.

Intuit to Sell off Quicken

Intuit to Sell off Quicken

As financial software firm Intuit continues to lose money, it has announced that it will be selling off Quicken, QuickBase, and Demandforce. However, the company will be holding on to QuickBooks, which picked up 110,000 subscribers during the last fiscal quarter. As for the fate of Quicken, we can only hope it's picked up by a developer friendlier to Mac users. -- MarketWatch.

Apple's 'lack' of enterprise security is anything but

Apple's 'lack' of enterprise security is anything but

A rather terrible CIO story's headline is "Most Apple devices lack proper security for the enterprise" and its even more "damning" sub-headline.

In reality it's not that Apple devices don't comply with the security features, it's that those companies' IT department don't enforce the offered security properly or at all. Which is a bit like calling a car unsafe because you choose not to use the brakes. -- Six Colors.

32 photos of Apple's early days before it ruled the world

32 photos of Apple's early days before it ruled the world

Everybody remembers when Steve Jobs returned to Apple and set the company on the incredible turnaround that's led to it becoming the world's most valuable company.

But before its legendary rise, Apple was just three guys in a garage in Los Altos, California.

Back then, it was a company struggling with IBM and Microsoft's meteoric success, and it would eventually face rough times where everything seemed like a lost cause.

Here's a look into the history of Apple in photos, from its inception through to the triumphant return of Jobs. -- Business Insider.

Amazon kills off Flash ads amid industry push towards HTML5

Amazon kills off Flash ads amid industry push towards HTML5

As of September 1, Amazon will stop serving Flash ads on amazon.com.

According to Amazon, the move is a response to the decision by many desktop browsers to block Flash, and follows calls by security experts for Adobe to kill off the browser plugin. -- ZDNet.

The 10 Best Wireless Routers of 2015

The 10 Best Wireless Routers of 2015

With the proliferation of connected home products, smartphones, smart TVs, and other mobile computing devices, it's more important than ever to outfit your home or business with a wireless router that can handle the increased demand for Wi-Fi connectivity. [And don't forget yesterdays article about Google's OnHub router. ] -- PC Magazine.

iOS 9 content blocking will transform the mobile Web: I've tried it

iOS 9 content blocking will transform the mobile Web: I've tried it

The next version of iOS comes with a major new feature called 'content blockers' which will allow users to install apps that block trackers, advertisements and other unwanted content for the first time.

Much has been written about the impending threat of ad blocking on iOS -- it's the first time blocking mobile advertisements en masse will be possible and publishers may face an existential threat to their revenue streams. -- The Next Web.

Privacy is more dead than we think

Privacy is more dead than we think

The concept of privacy has shifted from the connoted right it once was to a fading dream. Where family discussions once never left the dinner table, what a person does and thinks are now plastered across social media in a way once deemed unthinkable because it simply "wasn't anyone's business" not that long ago. Now, everything is everyone's business, and this change in culture has come about largely if not solely because of technology. -- iDownload Blog.

August 24Monday's News

 

Apple announces repair program for blurry iPhone 6 Plus cameras

Apple announces repair program for blurry iPhone 6 Plus cameras

Consumers who have experienced image quality problems with their iPhone 6 Plus's iSight camera may be eligible for a free repair, as Apple on Friday acknowledged a problem with a "small percentage" of units and will replace the affected component free of charge. -- AppleInsider.

Mozilla sets plan to dump Firefox add-ons, move to Chrome-like extensions

Mozilla sets plan to dump Firefox add-ons, move to Chrome-like extensions

Back in July, Mozilla disclosed plans to modernize its Firefox browser. Today, the organization made those plans more concrete, with a tentative timeline for introducing long-desired improvements such as the creation of a process per tab--and with it, a timeline for the end of support for traditional Firefox add-ons. -- Ars Technica.

Highway to hack: why we're just at the beginning of the auto-hacking era

Highway to hack: why we're just at the beginning of the auto-hacking era

Imagine it's 1995, and you're about to put your company's office on the Internet. Your security has been solid in the past--you've banned people from bringing floppies to work with games, you've installed virus scanners, and you run file server backups every night. So, you set up the Internet router and give everyone TCP/IP addresses. It's not like you're NASA or the Pentagon or something, so what could go wrong? -- Ars Technica.

Phone and laptop encryption guide: Protect your stuff and yourself

Phone and laptop encryption guide: Protect your stuff and yourself

The worst thing about having a phone or laptop stolen isn't necessarily the loss of the physical object itself, though there's no question that that part sucks. It's the amount of damage control you have to do afterward. Calling your phone company to get SIMs deactivated, changing all of your account passwords, and maybe even canceling credit cards are all good ideas, and they're just the tip of the iceberg. -- Ars Technica.

WALL-E

PowerBook180.jpeg

Sunday I was going though my office at home, trying to clear out some junk.

I opened a drawer and in a carrying case I found my old PowerBook 180. I not though of it in decades. I bought it back in 1992.

So I said what the heck and just for kicks plugged it in and pressed the power button, BONG!!! I booted right up!!

I had given the MacBook to my son as a game machine when I upgraded to a new Mac. The games were still there, Missile Command, Monopoly, Risk, etc.

It was running Sytem 7.5.5.

I felt like Dr. Who.

Are Apple fans irrationally loyal to their brand?

Are Apple fans irrationally loyal to their brand?

Apple fans have good reason to love the Cupertino company, which continues to revolutionize new product categories and deliver hugely successful products year after year. But how far should that love go?

Some might say there is a group of fans who are irrationally loyal to the Apple brand, devoted to buying its latest products just because they sport the Apple logo, and dismissing all competitors just because they don't. But is there really a "Cult of Apple?" -- Cult of Mac.

We've found 6 products that'll turn your photography from faux to pro

We've found 6 products that'll turn your photography from faux to pro

Everyone's a photographer these days, or at least that's what people would have you believe. Making images that have impact takes more than a camera-phone -- it takes special gear, knowledge, and skill with photographic hardware and software. We've got all those bases cover with these six deals, from lenses to lessons, cutting-edge cameras and powerful photo apps. Check them out now -- these deals might disappear before you can say 'cheese'. -- Cult of Mac.

Google's OnHub router may save WiFi from itself

Google's OnHub router may save WiFi from itself

Google this week introduced its first WiFi router and my initial reaction was "Why?" WiFi access points and home routers tend to be low-margin commodity products that could only hurt financial results for the search giant. What made it worth the pain on Wall Street, then, for Google to introduce this gizmo? And then I realized it is Google's best hope to save the Internet... and itself. -- I, Cringely.

What You're Not Doing with Your Mac Matters a Lot

What You're Not Doing with Your Mac Matters a Lot

In the early days of personal computers, there was nothing to do with them but compute. Nowadays, computers have wrapped us in a worldwide web of consumer services that's most helpful but masks the kinds of helpful research that can be done, even with a desktop computer. John Martellaro points to a fabulous article that just might shake many out of their doldrums. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple Seeds OS X El Capitan Recovery Update

Apple Seeds OS X El Capitan Recovery Update

Apple has seeded OS X El Capitan Recovery Update Version 2.0 for Mac that includes improvements to OS X Recovery. The software update can be installed through the Mac App Store and is recommended for all users running a pre-release version of OS X 10.11 El Capitan.

OS X Recovery is a feature on Mac that includes tools to reinstall OS X, repair your disk and restore from a Time Machine backup. The update supplements the seventh OS X El Capitan developer beta and fifth public beta released on Wednesday.

OS X El Capitan will be released in late 2015 as a free upgrade through the Mac App Store.

Latest Safari versions address browser hijacking

Latest Safari versions address browser hijacking

One of the more notorious problems you might run into when using a computer is a browser hijacking attack, where stumbling upon a maliciously crafted Web site will result in an alert being repeatedly displayed, regardless of how many times you try to close it. While you might resort to force-quitting Safari to overcome this problem, with Apple's "Resume" feature in OS X, when you re-launch the browser your Web pages will load again, resulting in the same frustrating behavior. -- MacIssues.

Unseen Burdens in Chrome That Can Lead a Mac to Lag

Unseen Burdens in Chrome That Can Lead a Mac to Lag

Determining whether a browser might be the source of a computer's sluggishness, and a look at Facebook's "authentic identity" policy. -- New York Times.

MDM Vulnerability In Apple iOS Sandbox Facilitates 'Rogue Apps'

MDM Vulnerability In Apple iOS Sandbox Facilitates 'Rogue Apps'

A vulnerability in Apple's iOS sandbox, which could affect personal information as well as configuration settings, has been discovered by Appthority's Enterprise Mobility Threat Team. It affects all mobile device management (MDM) clients, and any mobile applications distributed by an MDM that use the "Managed App Configuration" setting for private data. An attacker could potentially create a rogue app, perhaps masquerading as a productivity tool to increase the chances of it getting installed, and then distribute the attack by means of the iTunes store or "spear fishing" email attacks. -- The Stack.

Algorithmic Video Editor Turns Amateur Athletes into GoPro Heroes

Algorithmic Video Editor Turns Amateur Athletes into GoPro Heroes

Automated video and sound editing software can make any bumbling idiot into an extreme sports movie star.

Visit any surf break, mountain bike trail, or ski resort and you'll see people diligently filming their best moves, worst falls, and a lot of tedium in between using smartphones and action cameras such as a GoPro. Startup Shred Video has developed technology that tries to edit collections of such footage into short, slick, and shareable movies at the push of a button. -- TidBITS.

Adobe Drops Fonts, Leaves Users Stranded

Adobe Drops Fonts, Leaves Users Stranded

We wish this were one of our infamous April Fool's Day jokes, but it's not. At some point in the near past, sometime after InDesign CC was released, Adobe quietly stopped installing almost all the fonts that used to come with the program. Mike wrote that up here. At a time when Adobe has repeatedly announced its intentions to provide more robust typographic features and support customers better, we have to say that in our opinion, this move is a big mistake. -- InDesign Secrets.

Stolen iPhone selfies go viral as thieves are hunted online

Stolen iPhone selfies go viral as thieves are hunted online

A post containing selfies taken by a group of iPhone thieves has gone viral on Facebook -- being shared more than 100,000 times since being posted by the handset's rightful owner yesterday. -- Cult of Mac.

How to use Dropbox, OneDrive, Google Drive or iCloud as your main storage

How to use Dropbox, OneDrive, Google Drive or iCloud as your main storage

With firms such as Google, Microsoft, Apple and Dropbox offering gigabytes or even terabytes of online storage, sticking everything in the cloud is an appealing idea -- especially if you use lots of devices or your everyday machine has a relatively small SSD.

Most cloud services integrate with your operating system so on a PC or Mac all you need to do is save files to the appropriate folder -- but is it wise to rely on the cloud for your primary storage? Here are 10 things to think about when it comes to this key question. -- TechRadar UK.

How To Shoot Tethered to an iPad via Lightroom Mobile

How To Shoot Tethered to an iPad via Lightroom Mobile

In this episode of Adobe Creative Cloud TV I answer a Facebook Fan request on how to shoot tethered to an iPad? Unfortunately there still isn't a way to just plug in your camera to your iPad and have the images show up as you shoot with your DSLR and quite frankly even if you could it would have limited application due to the storage constraints on the iPad itself. So instead I've come up with a way to use Lightroom CC and Lightroom Mobile to accomplish the same thing not only to an iPad, but to an iPhone, Android phone, Android tablet or even a web browser. With the technique above you can shoot tethered to Lightroom and have your shots automatically sync to Lightroom Mobile via Creative Sync and those shots will be on all of your devices as well as the web simultaneously. -- Terry White's Tech Blog.

Pointers: Getting Things Done with Apple Gear -- Introduction

Pointers: Getting Things Done with Apple Gear -- Introduction

Perhaps you know this, but there is a productivity system, a methodology, called Getting Things Done which was invented by David Allen in the 1990s, and introduced to the world in his book. It's about handling all your work, about coping with lots of tasks and ultimately, yes, about getting things done. Allen is a spectacularly clever man, and his methods -- honed over years of working with corporate types under pressure -- are genuinely useful and we'd even go so far as to say brilliant. They take effort to master, but they're simple to understand and they are very effective, to the extent that GTD, as it's known, has its evangelists. So we're just about to annoy most of them. -- MacNN.

Deep and back linking in iOS 9: Explained

Deep and back linking in iOS 9: Explained

Deep links and back links not only make the iOS more navigable, they make it more powerful.

Two distinct but distinctly important problems are solved by deep links and back links in iOS 9. Deep links further blur the boundaries between native and online by enabling web links to be opened by associated apps. Back links allow you to return from where you came. With deep links and back links, if you're messaged a tweet and tap on it, instead of going to m.twitter.com you can go to the Twitter app. And with backlinks, you could return to messages with a single tap. -- iMore.