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MacVolPlace News will be on vacation next week. See you back here on June 1.

May 22 day's News

 

Apple seeks to improve the stylus with dynamic input based on pressure, grip, angle & more

Apple seeks to improve the stylus with dynamic input based on pressure, grip, angle & more

As rumors suggest Apple will launch a 12.9-inch iPad with a new stylus accessory later this year, a new patent application offers a glimpse at what the company could be working on, describing an advanced stylus that would offer much more dynamic ways of interacting with a touchscreen than just the press of a finger. -- AppleInsider.

Apple highlights accessibility in iOS apps, Apple Watch for Global Awareness Accessibility Day

Apple highlights accessibility in iOS apps, Apple Watch for Global Awareness Accessibility Day

In recognition of Global Awareness Accessibility Day on May 21, Apple has showcased a series of iOS apps and published a podcast highlighting its efforts to make Apple Watch easy to use for people with disabilities. -- AppleInsider.

Apple, IBM roll Apple Watch support into three MobileFirst apps

Apple, IBM roll Apple Watch support into three MobileFirst apps

As part of an ongoing enterprise solutions partnership, Apple and IBM on Thursday announced Apple Watch support for three MobileFirst apps serving the healthcare, public safety and energy industries. -- AppleInsider.

Apple Store app updated with two-step authentication, deeper Touch ID integration

Apple Store app updated with two-step authentication, deeper Touch ID integration

Apple on Thursday updated its Apple Store app for iOS with more comprehensive Touch ID support and a new two-factor authentication feature for securing users' Apple ID accounts.

Apple Store version 3.3 is now protected by a two-step authentication process, an added layer of security that requires app users to enter both a password and verification code before making a purchase. -- AppleInsider.

The Schiller Effect

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We know how many iPhones Apple ships but we don't know exactly how many of each model. We can try to come close in such estimates of "mix" by looking also at the market pricing of the phones and the average price Apple obtains.

Combining what we know with some guesses allows some us to estimate the composition of iPhone models in any given quarter's sales -- Asymco.

NSA hijacked Google Play to install spyware

NSA hijacked Google Play to install spyware

The National Security Agency and several of its allies around the world have hijacked connections to multiple Android app stores to plant spyware on hundreds of millions of devices.

According to a top secret document leaked by whistle-blower Edward Snowden, the Google Play Store, Samsung's app store, and UC Browser, a web browser that's incredibly popular in China and India, were the main targets. -- Cult of Mac.

House of Representatives approves bill cutting Earth science, energy funding

House of Representatives approves bill cutting Earth science, energy funding

The full House has now passed a new America COMPETES Act, which sets funding priorities for scientific research at several government agencies. While ostensibly intended to make US research more globally competitive, the bill would take some budgeting decisions out of the hands of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and instead allow Congress to set its research priorities. -- Ars Technica.

Three Easy Ways to Get Started With Home Automation

Three Easy Ways to Get Started With Home Automation

Home automation sounds really intimidating when you hear Kelly talk about hubs and horrible user experiences and compatibility concerns. Luckily there are three easy ways you can try a little bit of automation yourself without having to spend a lot of time learning new tech. Kelly has three examples of easy ways to set up cool automation in your house with a minimum of muss and fuss. -- The Mac Observer.

New 15-inch Retina MacBook Pro Lives Up to Apple's Claims, Reaches SSD Throughput Speeds of 2GB's

New 15-inch Retina MacBook Pro Lives Up to Apple's Claims, Reaches SSD Throughput Speeds of 2GB/s

Apple's new 15-inch Retina MacBook Pro, unveiled on Tuesday, didn't include a processor upgrade due to Broadwell delays, but it did get a Force Touch trackpad and one other major improvement -- new PCIe-based flash storage that Apple says is 2.5 times faster than the flash storage in previous-generation machines, with throughput up to 2GB/s.

In benchmark testing conducted by French site MacGeneration, the entry-level 2.2GHz 15-inch Retina MacBook Pro with 16GB RAM and 256GB of storage lived up to Apple's claims, demonstrating impressive read/write speeds that topped out at 2GB/s and 1.25GB/s, respectively, in QuickBench 4.0. -- MacRumors.

Apple Invents Compact and Powerful Hotspot Devices

Apple Invents Compact and Powerful Hotspot Devices

On May 21, 2015, the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals two new Hotspot devices enabling internet connectivity through a cellular network for devices like the non-Wi-Fi + Cellular iPad or any MacBook that doesn't have built-in wireless connectivity. -- Patently Apple.

In 1984, Jobs and Wozniak Talk About Apple's Earliest Days

In 1984, Jobs and Wozniak Talk About Apple's Earliest Days

In 1984, Apple launched the Apple IIc computer. As part of its promotion, it produced a video with Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and other employees talking about company's founding and the creation of the Apple I and Apple II computers. Over at Fast Company, I've shared this remarkable, little-seen bit of history. It's full of goodies, from images of Jobs and Wozniak wearing remarkably Apple Watch-like timepieces to evocative photos of early computer stores. -- Fast Company.

How to Throttle iCloud Photo Library Uploads

How to Throttle iCloud Photo Library Uploads

Frustrated by Photos sucking all your Internet bandwidth to sync photos to iCloud Photo Library? There's a solution, but it's a bit geeky and requires installing an Apple developer utility. Adam Engst walks you through it. -- TidBITS.

Use captive Wi-Fi networks on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch

Use captive Wi-Fi networks on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch

Captive Wi-Fi networks are public Wi-Fi networks that you subscribe to or pay to use. These networks are also called "subscription" or "Wi-Fi Hotspot" networks. You can find captive Wi-Fi networks in coffee shops, Internet cafes, hotels, airports, and other public locations. In some countries, captive networks are sponsored and maintained by wireless carriers (like AT&T wireless hotspots in Starbucks). -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Mac 911: Using old versions of iWork alongside the new Pages, Keynote, and Numbers

Mac 911: Using old versions of iWork alongside the new Pages, Keynote, and Numbers

Apple released the newest versions of the suite of apps formerly known as iWork--Pages, Numbers, and Keynote--in late 2013 to exclamations of dismay. The revisions were written from the ground up, rather than extending previous versions, and many features of previous releases were missing and never to return (at least so far) in the 2013 refresh.

Even after 18 months of incremental improvements, questions still abound, and I'll be answering some of them this week, along with a handful of extra advice. -- Macworld.

Do you need to care if Apple changes its system font? (Spoiler: Nah)

Do you need to care if Apple changes its system font? (Spoiler: Nah)

9to5Mac reported yesterday that Apple may switch out the system font used in OS X and iOS from Helvetica Neue to San Francisco, the font it developed in-house for the Apple Watch. And if you listen very carefully, that faint background noise you can just discern on the edge of your hearing is half the Apple community bellowing denunciations that this is a stupid idea, and half yelling that OS X 10.11 and iOS 9 (when the switch is rumored to happen) can't come soon enough. -- Macworld.

Confessions of an OS X 'Mac laggard'

Confessions of an OS X 'Mac laggard

Are You A "Mac Laggard?" I am, unapologetically. "Mac Laggard" is at term coined by Computerworld's Gregg Keizer in reference to those of us who are in no hurry to upgrade to the current version of OS X, whatever it may be.

Keizer cites data from Web analytics firm Net Applications, finding that three OS X versions at least three years old respectively held five or more percentage points of OS X user share last month: namely, 2009's v10.6 Snow Leopard, 2011's v10.7 Lion and 2012's v10.8 Mountain Lion. They cumulatively powered 20% of Macs used online in April. When 2007's v10.5 Leopard was included, the obsolete version use metric rose to 21.3%. -- TechnologyTell.

Why Clarks is measuring feet with iPads

Why Clarks is measuring feet with iPads

If you go to a shoe shop during half term next week, you may see lots of children getting their feet measured with iPads. Shoe company Clarks has bet millions on the scheme, hoping it will be rewarded with an invaluable bonanza of digital data. -- BBC.

How to set up and use Accessibility on Apple Watch

How to set up and use Accessibility on Apple Watch

Devices like the Apple Watch can be convenient, even empowering for many people. For those with accessibility needs, however, they can be life changing. They can let people go where they could never go before, speak with people they could never reach before, and see the world in ways that were once impossible. What's more, by making the Apple Watch accessible and inclusive to people who are blind or have visual impairments, deaf or have auditory impairments, or who have motor skill or learning or other challenges, Apple makes it more accessible and inclusive to everyone.

The Apple Watch is in its first generation, but here's all the accessibility features it already enjoys, along with how to set them up and use them. -- iMore.

Apple Support Rocks! My Experience with AppleCare

Apple Support Rocks! My Experience with AppleCare

Yesterday I noticed a problem on my Mac Pro while trying to use Messages app. For those of you unfamiliar with OS X and Messages, it is an app that allows you to receive and reply to text messages from iPhones in addition to many other features. A friend had offered to pick me up a Subway sandwich on his way over and I was trying to text my complicated order to his iPhone which I thought might be easier to do on my Mac Pro than from my iPhone. -- Global Watchdog.

May 21 Thrusday's News

 

Apple upgrades some 27" non-Retina iMac orders to 5K model following price cut

pple upgrades some 27

Some consumers who ordered Apple's top-end, non-Retina 27-inch iMac in advance of Tuesday's iMac lineup shuffle have seen their orders automatically upgraded to the new, less costly Retina 5K base model. -- AppleInsider.

Apple Watch connects to display pedestal via 'hidden' data port with Lightning connector, photos show

Apple Watch connects to display pedestal via 'hidden' data port with Lightning connector, photos show

A set of images posted to the Web on Wednesday purportedly show a partially dismantled Apple Watch in-store display with attached Lightning cable, suggesting the device can be charged and fed data via a hidden data port. -- AppleInsider.

Apple plans to refresh iOS 9, OS X 10.11 using new Apple Watch font

Apple plans to refresh iOS 9, OS X 10.11 using new Apple Watch font

A report indicates that the forthcoming releases of iOS and OS X will use the Apple Watch's "San Francisco" as the system typeface, moving away from the Helvetica Neue typeface introduced in iOS 7 and OS X Yosemite.

The typeface, available for registered Apple developers to download here, is "designed specifically for legibility on small screens." We've included a comparison of the "ultralight" weight of both typefaces above.

Two things are immediately apparent--first, San Francisco is just a shade heavier than Helvetica Neue at the same size and weight. Second, San Francisco is narrower horizontally, which is doubtless helpful when you're working with a screen as small as the one on the Apple Watch. It's harder to say how the typeface would work with the wide variety of screen sizes (and the Retina and non-Retina displays) available across all iOS and OS X product lines, though 9to5Mac has some mockups and other screenshots that give you a rough idea. -- 9to5Mac.

'90s-style security flaw puts 'millions' of routers at risk

'90s-style security flaw puts 'millions' of routers at risk

As companies continue to beat the Internet of Things drum, promoting a world when every device is smart, and anything electronic is network connected, we have some news that shows just what a horrible idea this really is. A security firm has found that a Linux kernel driver called NetUSB contains an amateurish error that can be exploited by hackers to remotely compromise any device running the driver. The driver is commonly found in home routers, and while some offer the ability to disable it, others do not appear to do so. -- Ars Technica.

Holy crap! LG has made HDTV as thin as wallpaper

Holy crap! LG has made HDTV as thin as wallpaper

Short on room space? LG has just busted through the thinness limit on massive screened television sets and unveiled its proof of concept HDTV that's as thin as paper.

Sure, it's not in production yet, and will likely cost way too much for the average person to buy at first, but a press-on wallpaper television set is pretty high on our list of wants. -- Cult of Mac.

We're all suckers for filtered photos

We're all suckers for filtered photos

The researchers at Yahoo labs have just quantified the use of filters on digital photos. Say what you want about the death of the art of photography -- filters will get your photos noticed.

"We find two groups of serious and casual photographers among filter users," write the researchers at Yahoo Labs. "The serious see filters as correction tools and prefer milder effects. Casual photographers, by contrast, use filters to significantly transform their photos with bolder effects." -- Cult of Mac.

Meet OS X Yosemite Extensions

Meet OS X Yosemite Extensions

Extensions have made a return to your Mac. These aren't the extensions you remember from the olden days of Mac troubleshooting, though. Kelly has the breakdown on what they are and how you can boss them around. -- The Mac Observer.

Redundancy Is the New Productivity for Your Mac

Redundancy Is the New Productivity for Your Mac

Dr. Mac has been teaching people how to use their Macs more effectively for as long as he can remember. So he was surprised to find himself at a loss for words when a friend asked, "If you could only recommend one thing to help me become more productive on my Mac, what would it be?" This week in Dr. Mac's Rants & Raves Episode 123 he explains why redundancy makes you more productive. -- The Mac Observer.

Browser address bar exploit persists in Safari; other Mac browsers unaffected

Browser address bar exploit persists in Safari; other Mac browsers unaffected

A bug that existed in both Chrome and Safari continues to persist in Safari, and allows a malicious Web site to spoof the browser's address bar to make it appear that you are at one URL when in fact you are at another. -- MacIssues.

Apple Invents Spatially Interactive 2D/3D Displays

Apple Invents Spatially Interactive 2D/3D Displays

On May 21, 2015, the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that generally relates to computing devices, and more specifically to computing devices capable of displaying a spatially interactive, combined two-dimensional and three-dimensional display. Two different users viewing content on this kind of display on a computer, TV (other computing device) or iDevice will be able to see different imagery from different angles. Content seen by one user may not be seen by the other looking at the same display at the same time. -- Patently Apple.

Microsoft Office 2011 14.5.1

Microsoft Office 2011 14.5.1

Microsoft has issued version 14.5.1 of its Office 2011 suite, which fixes a major bug with Outlook that was introduced by the recently released version 14.5 update. Version 14.5.1 patches the same security vulnerability included in version 14.5, which could allow remote code execution from maliciously crafted Word, Excel, and PowerPoint files due to how Office 2011 handled files in memory -- TidBITS.

Some waiting for iMacs have been given a free upgrade to Retina, but is that a good deal?

Some waiting for iMacs have been given a free upgrade to Retina, but is that a good deal?

A Redditor awaiting delivery of a non-Retina 27-inch iMac ordered before yesterday's announcement of the new Retina models has reported being given a free upgrade by Apple.

While a free upgrade from the standard display to the Retina one sounds like a no-brainer (with a slightly beefier processor thrown in), there is one difference that is giving the video producer pause for thought. His non-Retina model came with the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780M graphics card, while the base-model Retina gets the AMD Radeon R9 M290X. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple's planned iOS 9 'Home' app uses virtual rooms to manage HomeKit accessories

Apple's planned iOS 9 'Home' app uses virtual rooms to manage HomeKit accessories

Apple's plan to manage upcoming HomeKit-compatible accessories could revolve around a new iOS app called "Home," according to sources familiar with the app. Introduced at last year's Worldwide Developers Conference, HomeKit is an Apple initiative designed to encourage accessory makers to integrate "connected home" accessories such as Wi-Fi garage door openers, smart thermostats akin to Nest's Learning Thermostat, and wireless door locks with iPhones and iPads. Using Siri or the Home app, users will be able to remotely control parts of their homes directly from iOS devices. -- 9to5Mac.

ResearchKit, Apple's Medical Data Experiment, Explained

ResearchKit, Apple's Medical Data Experiment, Explained

If an Apple product is released and hundreds of people aren't lined up outside the Apple Store to buy it, is it still an Apple product?

Yes. Yes, it is. The product I have in mind has been downloaded from the App Store and used by over 65,000 people in two months, and the results could impact us over several lifetimes.

I'm talking about ResearchKit, which is Apple's way of letting people use their iOS devices and apps to join medical studies and send data to researchers. -- Re/code.

When adware attacks! And how to defeat it

When adware attacks! And how to defeat it

You've got a Mac and, from what you've heard, there's no evil that can touch you.

No viruses.

A Mac App Store with guaranteed clean applications.

No worries whatsoever.

And then...your favorite web browser suddenly seems to have a mind of its own; taking you places you have no interest in going and warning you of evils on your Mac that don't actually exist. -- Macworld.

Recognizing Email Phishing Scams

Recognizing Email Phishing Scams

Chances are you regularly get fake email claiming to be from companies that you do business with. However, these scam emails are trying to trick you into giving up your passwords and other information. It is important to be skeptical of every email message you receive and to learn to recognize the signs of phishing scams. Even email messages that seem to come from friends and relatives can be scams. -- MacMost.

Get All Geeky On Your Bad Self And Edit App Preference Settings On Your Mac

Get All Geeky On Your Bad Self And Edit App Preference Settings On Your Mac

This is easy. If you're not comfortable changing preferences or configurations for an app on your Mac, move along; there's nothing to see here.

However, if you'd like to get your geek on here's the way to start. It's a useful utility called PrefEdit; as in, 'edit preferences' for various and sundry Mac apps. Changing preferences is not for the faint of heart Mac user, but PrefEdit makes editing easy enough for the common man. -- Mac 360.

Your brain's unique response to words can reveal your identity

Your brain's unique response to words can reveal your identity

Watch your language. Words mean different things to different people -- so the brainwaves they provoke could be a way to identify you.

Blair Armstrong of the Basque Center on Cognition, Brain, and Language in Spain and his team recorded the brain signals of 45 volunteers as they read a list of 75 acronyms -- such as FBI or DVD -- then used computer programs to spot differences between individuals. The participants' responses varied enough that the programs could identify the volunteers with about 94 per cent accuracy when the experiment was repeated. -- New Scientist.

These Guys Want to Build a Phone the Size of a Credit Card

These Guys Want to Build a Phone the Size of a Credit Card

It's hard to say exactly when it happened, but the moment has almost certainly already arrived: It's no longer cool to use a smartphone.

"There are all these apps and wearables, and they're all claiming to give us our life back," Joe Hollier says. "I couldn't help but feel like they were lying." Hollier, a New York City artist and designer, is one half of the team behind the Light, a phone that promises to wean us off our smarter phones. -- Wired.

ACM 307 - Dr. Mac's One Tip for Mastering Your Mac, Apple TV, and the Importance of Encryption

ACM 307 - Dr. Mac's One Tip for Mastering Your Mac, Apple TV, and the Importance of Encryption

Bryan Chaffin is joined this week by Bob "Dr. Mac" LeVitus on the Apple Context Machine. They look at Dr. Mac's one tip for making the most of your Mac, whether or not Apple was ever going to make a television set, and Apple's support for encryption that actually works. -- The Mac Observer.

Mistake One

Mistake One

I've had mixed luck with impulse buys.

As a kid, I impulse-bought Marble Madness for my Sega Genesis. I saw it in Electronics Boutique, the box looked really cool, and it was only $40. Without having read any magazine reviews, I took the chance. It ended up being the worst Genesis game I owned.

I also impulse-bought the first Retina MacBook Pro. I didn't want to wait weeks for a custom build, so I drove to the Apple Store and bought the base model. -- Marco Arment.

Outlook for iOS 8 vs Apple Mail for iOS: Mail is now lagging behind Microsoft's offering

Outlook for iOS 8 vs Apple Mail for iOS: Mail is now lagging behind Microsoft's offering

Microsoft's new Outlook for iOS app boasts an impressive amount of functionality, plus a cool design language. Could this be the app to finally replace Apple's own Mail app? -- Macworld UK.

May 1920 Wednesday's News

 

Apple launches new 15-inch MacBook Pro with Force Touch trackpad

Apple launches new 15-inch MacBook Pro with Force Touch trackpad

Apple on Tuesday issued an update to its 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display, adding faster Intel processors, as well as the new pressure-sensitive Force Touch trackpad. -- AppleInsider.

Apple lowers price of 5K iMac, adds new $1,999 configuration

Apple lowers price of 5K iMac, adds new $1,999 configuration

Apple on Tuesday unveiled a new entry-level $1,999 configuration for its ultra high-resolution 5K iMac while dropping the price of the top-end model to just $2,299, making it easier for consumers to get their hands on Retina-quality displays for the desktop. -- AppleInsider.

Apple adds new Lightning dock for iPhone 6, 6 Plus

Apple adds new Lightning dock for iPhone 6, 6 Plus

Alongside updates to its MacBook Pro and Retina iMac lines, Apple on Tuesday released a small but long-anticipated accessory for iPhone owners with an all-new Lightning dock designed to work with the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus. -- AppleInsider.

First Apple Watch update released: Watch OS 1.0.1 improves Siri, standing activities, calorie counting, more

First Apple Watch update released: Watch OS 1.0.1 improves Siri, standing activities, calorie counting, more

Apple on Tuesday released Watch OS 1.0.1, its first-ever software update for the newly released Apple Watch, addressing a myriad of bugs and issues, including improved performance for Siri, measuring standing activities, counting calories for indoor cycling and rowing, and more. -- AppleInsider.

Apple starts advertising Watch as part of connected iOS, Mac ecosystem

Apple starts advertising Watch as part of connected iOS, Mac ecosystem

Apple updated its online storefront on Tuesday with fresh imagery and text touting so-called Continuity features that interconnect iOS, Mac and now Apple Watch devices. -- AppleInsider.

Sadie's Apple Watch Arrived Two Weeks Early

Sadie's Apple Watch Arrived Two Weeks Early

This is Sadie the Dog wearing her new Apple Watch. The watch actually belongs to my young and lovely wife, Mary Alyce, but she was unwilling to be photographed this morning while Sadie will pose anytime, anywhere. This is the Sport model of the Apple Watch in space gray with a black band. What makes this picture interesting is the watch was delivered last Friday two weeks early. -- I, Cringely.

Home Automation: Understanding a Resident Device vs Automation Hub

Home Automation: Understanding a Resident Device vs Automation Hub

Apple has always maintained that Apple TV is a "resident device" for HomeKit, not an automation hub. What's that mean? Kelly has more information on the difference and what it means for the smartness of your house. -- The Mac Observer.

How to manually remove MacKeeper from your Mac

How to manually remove MacKeeper from your Mac

One of the more controversial pieces of software available for OS X is a package called MacKeeper, which by fairly aggressive and widespread scare-tactic advertising has many Mac users convinced it is required software for keeping their systems safe, clean, and in proper working order. Any claims that this or similar software are requirements are false, but unfortunately many who have tried the software may find that even after removing it, they still have remnants of it on their systems that issue various notices about how their systems are critically unsafe, with recommendations to re-activate and re-install the software. -- MacIssues.

Apple Granted 37 Patents Today Covering Liquid Metal for the iPhone, Mac Pro Tower & More

Apple Granted 37 Patents Today Covering Liquid Metal for the iPhone, Mac Pro Tower & More

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 37 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we briefly cover patents related to the Mac Pro tower, liquid metal used to create a major component of the iPhone and more. -- Patently Apple.

How To Install Watch OS updates on your Apple Watch

How To Install Watch OS updates on your Apple Watch

The Apple Watch received its first official software update today, giving lucky early adopters their first opportunity to see how the Watch OS updating process works. Unlike the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, which can update themselves using iOS's Software Update feature, the Apple Watch depends upon an iPhone to download the update from Apple's servers and install it on the Watch. You'll also need a Wi-Fi network, your Apple Watch charger, and at least 50% battery life in order to do the update. -- 9to5Mac.

Even with free annual upgrades, Apple faces stubborn OS X fragmentation

Even with free annual upgrades, Apple faces stubborn OS X fragmentation

Although Apple has done a better job of moving its Mac users along with each new operating system than has rival Microsoft, the Cupertino, Calif. company has been unable to eradicate fragmentation as it accelerated upgrades to an annual cadence. -- Computerworld.

Final Cut Pro X 10.2 review: Apple's professional video editor remains at the top of its game

Final Cut Pro X 10.2 review: Apple's professional video editor remains at the top of its game

Our last look at Apple's professional video editor, Final Cut Pro X, was not quite a year ago (turn to the next page to see what we had to say about that version) and yet there have been five (yes, count 'em, five) separate updates since then. Many of these updates have been bug fixes but there have been some notable enhancements, including a major version update. -- Macworld UK.

How to use the Adjust tools in Photos for OS X

How to use the Adjust tools in Photos for OS X

Many years ago, I was in an office of desktop-publishing authors, and the running joke was how a program needed a Make Better button. Very amusing, until software like Apple's iOS Photos app added an Enhance button that often just made things better. Using a reasonably sophisticated analysis of an image, a single click could reshape an image's tones to make it an objectively more fuller-toned version of itself.

But "better" is often not good enough, and if you're willing roll your sleeves up a tiny bit, the new Photos for OS X app includes substantially more refined, more granular, and easier-to-use tools than iPhoto. They're also quite speedy to preview and apply in comparison. -- Macworld.

How to stream from a Mac to an Apple TV with no Wi-Fi

How to stream from a Mac to an Apple TV with no Wi-Fi

The Apple TV is capable of streaming video content over the Internet or content that's stored locally on host Macs or Windows PCs connected to the same Wi-Fi network. But what if there is no local Wi-Fi network? Well, this week, I'm actually coming to you with a question, because I'm stumped. -- iMore.

How to Display More Screen Resolution Options in Mac OS X

How to Display More Screen Resolution Options in Mac OS X

These are instructions on how to display additional screen resolution options when setting the resolution of your monitor in Mac OS X Yosemite. These steps will likely work for other versions of OS X as well, including Mavericks, Mountain Lion, and Lion. -- iClarified.

What You Didn't Know You Could Do To Email You Can Do On Your Mac

What You Didn't Know You Could Do To Email You Can Do On Your Mac

My personal, unscientific, informal survey of family, friends, and co-workers reveals the obvious. Most of us hate email.

With all the hatred for email why don't we Mac users rise up in revolt and switch to different email apps more frequently? Because once you get a few thousand email messages archived, you're not inclined to try something different. There's pain involved with switching. Here's a way to ease the pain for 99-cents. -- Mac 360.

May 19 Tuesday's News

 

How Coherent Navigation can help Apple with location technology and talent

How Coherent Navigation can help Apple with location technology and talent

Apple's recent acquisition of Coherent Navigation, a California firm that worked on high-precision satellite navigation projects for the likes of the U.S. Navy, might at first seem a bit outside of the iPhone maker's wheelhouse.?But a closer look reveals what could, in fact, be an excellent match. -- AppleInsider.

Safari address-spoofing bug could be used in phishing, malware attacks

Safari address-spoofing bug could be used in phishing, malware attacks

From the department of things that aren't what they seem, researchers have demonstrated a new address-spoofing exploit that tricks Safari users into thinking they're visiting one site when in fact the Apple-made browser is connected to an entirely different address. -- Ars Technica.

WSJ: Apple dropped plans for a TV set 'more than a year ago'

WSJ: Apple dropped plans for a TV set 'more than a year ago'

There have been predictions about an Apple television set so often and for so long that it's become a sort of running gag among Apple watchers, but a new report from the Wall Street Journal has poured yet more cold water on those forecasts. The typical "people familiar with the matter" tell the WSJ that Apple had "a small team" working on a TV set for a few years, but that the team had been disbanded and its members reassigned to other projects "more than a year ago." -- Ars Technica.

How to Use Siri on iPhone and iPad

How to Use Siri on iPhone and iPad

Siri is a workhorse of a virtual assistant for iOS, but I rarely see anyone actually using the feature on the iPhone. Maybe it is because most people don't know all of the amazing things she (or he) can do. Siri's improved a lot over the past several years and there's now a long list of tasks she can accomplish, so if you haven't been using Siri it might be time to give it another look. -- MacRumors.

Fix your Mac's network name getting (2) appended to it

Fix your Mac's network name getting (2) appended to it

When you enable services like screen sharing, file sharing, or printer sharing, OS X will broadcast your Mac's name on the local network so it can be discovered and made available to other systems. However, when you do so you may run into an issue where a number is appended to your Mac's name. For example, if your iMac is named "My iMac," you might expect to see just this name appear in the Finder of other Macs on the network; however, with this naming issue you will see "My iMac (2)." -- MacIssues.

Apple Wins Patent for a Projector System Designed for Controlling Games on iDevices via Gestures

Apple Wins Patent for a Projector System Designed for Controlling Games on iDevices via Gestures

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 37 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a granted patent covering a pattern projector. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted a 3D In-Air Gesture System that Controls Actions on a Display or Future TV

Apple Granted a 3D In-Air Gesture System that Controls Actions on a Display or Future TV

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 37 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a second PrimeSense 3D user interface control system published today that could be used to perform in-air gestures to control actions on a computer display and/or a future TV system. -- Patently Apple.

Mac Basics: Browse the web with Safari 7 in Mavericks

Mac Basics: Browse the web with Safari 7 in Mavericks

Safari is the web browser included with OS X Mavericks. Learn about using Safari, as well as ways to personalize your browsing experience. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Cleaning your Apple products

Cleaning your Apple products

The materials used to make Apple products vary; in some cases each product might have specific cleaning requirements, which might vary by the part you are cleaning.

Read recommendations and guidelines for cleaning your Apple computer, iPad, iPhone, iPod, display, or peripheral device. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Apple Wins a Patent that Kick Started Passbook and Apple Pay

Apple Wins a Patent that Kick Started Passbook and Apple Pay

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 37 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular granted patent report we cover Apple's famed Concert Ticket patent that we covered back in 2010 titled "Apple Introduces us to a New iTunes "Concert Ticket +" System." Apple's NFC related patent was one of the original patents that would go on to form Apple's Passbook application. Passbook is an application in iOS that allows users to store coupons, boarding passes, event tickets, store cards, credit cards and is now directly related to the use of Apple Pay. -- Patently Apple.

Everything is broken: Why you shouldn't beat yourself up when troubleshooting

Everything is broken: Why you shouldn't beat yourself up when troubleshooting

I've made a decent to large part of my living for more than 20 years learning about how to fix problems and then trying to tell others how to follow suit. And the last couple of weeks have been among my highest in terms of frustration in using computers in my entire life. But, per my modus operandi, I have truth born from a bloody fight to share with you. -- Macworld.

How Apple keeps my far-flung family together

How Apple keeps my far-flung family together

Modern technology gets a bad rap for creating distance between people (how many tiresome memes have we all seen depicting people playing on their iPhones instead of talking to each other?)

For the Caolo family -- which began in 1970's Scranton, Pennsylvania and today is spread across Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania and Florida -- Apple's computers and software are literally, part of the family. The part that keeps us together. -- Apple World Today.

An incredibly significant group of consumers is NOT buying iPhone 6

An incredibly significant group of consumers is NOT buying iPhone 6

If you want to get an idea of just how huge Apple's iPhone 6 is going to be globally, then the latest investor note from Citi Research analyst Jim Suva is a must-read.

It provides more evidence that the iPhone 6 is fundamentally different from previous iPhones because repeat Apple customers are NOT the main buyers of iPhone 6.

Rather, everyone else is. -- Business Insider.

Microsoft To Teachers: Using Pens and Paper Not Fair To Students

Microsoft To Teachers: Using Pens and Paper Not Fair To Students

Pens and paper have no place in the modern classroom, according to Lia De Cicco Remu, director of Partners in Learning at Microsoft Canada. "When was the last time you used a piece of chalk to express yourself?" De Cicco Remu, a former teacher, asked the Georgia Straight by phone from Toronto. "Kids don't express themselves with chalk or in cursive. Kids text."

Given the Microsoft Study Finds Technology Hurting Attention Spans story posted to Slashdot in the last few days it would seem that Redmond's Marketing and R&D people are at cross-purposes. -- The Georgia Straight.

May 18 Monday's News

 

Apple acquires high-accuracy GPS technology firm Coherent Navigation

Apple acquires high-accuracy GPS technology firm Coherent Navigation

In the midst of a major overhaul for its Maps service, Apple seems to have made another under-the-radar acquisition as the company apparently snapped up Coherent Navigation, makers of high-accuracy GPS devices and software. -- AppleInsider.

An essay concerning how Star Wars illuminates constitutional law

An essay concerning how Star Wars illuminates constitutional law

Who knew that George Lucas and constitutional law had so much in common?

Evidently Cass R. Sunstein did. The Harvard Law School constitutional scholar and former administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs for President Obama makes such an argument in his forthcoming Michigan Law Review article titled How Star Wars Illuminates Constitutional Law. -- Ars Technica.

Headaches await if you break your Apple Watch

Headaches await if you break your Apple Watch

What happens when you try to get a broken Apple Watch repaired? Not much of anything!

I know this because my Apple Watch broke last week and I have a repair order pending.

Luckily, the watch is covered by Apple's AppleCare+ extended warranty, which covers accidental damage. It also offers two-day express replacement. No downtime without your new precious. -- Cult of Mac.

These old Apple devices are about to become obsolete

These old Apple devices are about to become obsolete

Apple has released a list of devices that will stop receiving repair and parts service in Apple Stores on June 9.

The full list includes a few gadgets that we were frankly a little surprised were still receiving support. Devices like the 11 year-old Xserve RAID mass-storage device (the one that supported Small Form-factor Pluggables, if you're curious) and the mid-2007 model iMac.

Apple considers devices that have been out of production for seven years "obsolete," which means that they will neither fix them themselves nor will they send out parts. A middle ground of "vintage" exists for products discontinued between five and seven years ago. No hardware service exists for vintage items unless you bought them in California or Turkey. In those two places, AppleCare will still take your call, and you can get both parts and service for those last two years. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Apple Watch Security Bug Overblown

Apple Watch Security Bug Overblown

The Internet lit up on Thursday with reports of the horrible security bug in Apple Watch that makes it an easy target for criminals. The real problem isn't that Apple Watch has a big security bug (it doesn't) it's that an intended feature of the watch is being presented as if it's a bug. The reality is that Apple Watch isn't more prone to theft than any other quality watch, although Apple could take steps to make it less desirable to steal. -- The Mac Observer.

iTunes Needs To Break Up... With Itself

iTunes Needs To Break Up... With Itself

With each evolution of Apple, it seems a new section gets bolted on to iTunes, making it even more complex and complicated. This seems out of character for a company that built a reputation on clean straightforward design. Kelly proposes shelving the current version of iTunes, the Weasley's House of Apple software. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple Raises iCloud Contacts Limit to 50,000

Apple Raises iCloud Contacts Limit to 50,000

Apple has updated a support document on its website to reflect that iCloud now has a limit of 50,000 contacts, double the previous limit of 25,000 contacts (via iFun.de). iPhone, iPad and Mac users can now store up to 50,000 contacts between their iCloud-enabled devices, while all other limits for calendars, reminders and bookmarks have not been changed. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

How Windows 10 Performs On a 12-inch MacBook

How Windows 10 Performs On a 12-inch MacBook

As Microsoft prepares for the launch of Windows 10, review sites have been performing all sorts of benchmarks on the tech preview to evaluate how well the operating system will run. But now a computer science student named Alex King has made the most logical performance evaluation of all: testing Windows 10's performance on a 2015 MacBook.

He says, "Here's the real kicker: it's fast. It's smooth. It renders at 60FPS unless you have a lot going on. It's unequivocally better than performance on OS X, further leading me to believe that Apple really needs to overhaul how animations are done.

Even when I turn Transparency off in OS X, Mission Control isn't completely smooth. Here, even after some Aero Glass transparency has been added in, everything is smooth.

It's remarkable, and it makes me believe in the 12-inch MacBook more than ever before. So maybe it's ironic that in some regards, the new MacBook runs Windows 10 (a prerelease version, at that) better than it runs OS X. -- Alex King.

Review: Macphun's Noiseless is the affordable photo noise killer that will save your grainy pictures

Review: Macphun's Noiseless is the affordable photo noise killer that will save your grainy pictures

As a serious photographer, I do as much as I can to make my daily shots excellent, using cameras with low-noise sensors and fast lenses -- then trying to keep them as steady as possible in low light. But even the latest and best cameras can't snap perfectly clean images in dark surroundings. Grainy noise is basically inevitable in darkness, and the more basic the camera you're using, the more likely it is to appear in a wider variety of pictures. To reduce noise, you can either shell out thousands of dollars for new camera gear, or try to fix your noisy photos with software. -- 9to5Mac.

iPhoto '09 & iPhoto '11: Improving face recognition results

iPhoto '09 & iPhoto '11: Improving face recognition results

Learn how to improve face recognition results in iPhoto '09 and iPhoto '11.

Follow the guidelines here to improve the face recognition capabilities of iPhoto '09 and iPhoto '11.

Note: Only faces that have been automatically detected in your photo library will help iPhoto match faces. Manually identified faces will not aid iPhoto's face-matching ability. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

About Thunderbolt to Thunderbolt cable (2.0 m)

About Thunderbolt to Thunderbolt cable (2.0 m)

Learn more about Thunderbolt to Thunderbolt cable (2.0 m) and find answers to frequently asked questions, including the proper usage of Thunderbolt cables.

Thunderbolt to Thunderbolt cable (2.0 m) is a two meter long cable that has a Thunderbolt connection on both ends and can be used for connecting Thunderbolt devices and peripherals to a Mac which has at least one Thunderbolt port. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Apple Says First HomeKit Smart Devices Coming in June

Apple Says First HomeKit Smart Devices Coming in June

Apple said the first HomeKit-enabled smart-home devices are coming out next month, refuting a report that said delays with the home automation software platform would push back the launch until August or September. -- Wall Street Journal.

Yosemite Mouse Malfunction

Yosemite Mouse Malfunction

Since upgrading to Yosemite, there has been an issue with the mouse cursor and it's behavior. Depending on the use, the cursor blinks, jitters, and switch between the cursor and the hand. It also jumps when trying to draw lines in Photoshop to a point that it's unusable. How can I fix this? -- Mac|Life.

How I Would Fix iTunes, Part 15: Fix Shuffle

How I Would Fix iTunes, Part 15: Fix Shuffle

This is one of a series of articles looking at elements of iTunes that I think need fixing. I'll choose one element for each article, and offer a solution. See all articles in this series.

Remember, back in the day, when you clicked the Shuffle button on a playlist, iTunes would re-order the songs, showing you the order in which they'd be played? If you didn't like it, you could move some of the songs around, or re-shuffle the list. -- Kirkville.