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October 31 Black CatPumpkin

 

Working Without A Net: The eight worst predictions in the history of technology

The eight worst predictions in the history of technology

Technology moves at a dizzying pace, making predictions about the industry dangerous. But this doesn't stop people from having a go - often with hilarious results.

  1. I think there is a world market for maybe five computers. -- IBM president Thomas Watson, 1943
  2. I predict the Internet will soon go spectacularly supernova and in 1996 catastrophically collapse. -- Robert Metcalfe, founder of 3Com, 1995
  3. The Americans have need of the telephone, but we do not. We have plenty of messenger boys. -- Sir William Preece, chief engineer at the British Post Office
  4. Two years from now, spam will be solved. -- Bill Gates, founder of Microsoft, 2004
  5. Everyone's always asking me when Apple will come out with a cell phone. My answer is, 'Probably never. -- David Pogue, The New York Times, 2006
  6. Television won't be able to hold on to any market it captures after the first six months. People will soon get tired of staring at a plywood box every night. -- Darryl Zanuck, 20th Century Fox, 1946
  7. There is practically no chance communications space satellites will be used to provide better telephone, telegraph, television, or radio service inside the United States. -- T. Craven, FCC Commissioner, 1961
  8. Apple is already dead. -- Nathan Myhrvold, former CTO of Microsoft

Apple vows it will never make a cheap iPhone

Apple vows it will never make a cheap iPhone

Apple has revealed that it has no plans to challenge Google and Microsoft in the low-end devices market, vowing that it will never launch a 'cheap' iPhone or Mac.

Speaking at the Code/Mobile conference in California this week, Apple marketing executive Greg Joswiak acknowledged that the company is losing out to Android at the lower end of the market.

However, he said that Apple is focused on creating premium devices for the few rather than budget devices for the many. -- Telegraph.

Anita Sarkeesian goes on Colbert. You'll totally believe what happens next

Anita Sarkeesian goes on Colbert. You'll totally believe what happens next

If anyone was still unaware of GamerGate by this point, Stephen Colbert provided a one-night crash course through an editorial segment (below) and an interview with critic Anita Sarkeesian. -- Ars Technica.

Why is the new iMac 5K instead of 4K? It's all about the video, baby

Why is the new iMac 5K instead of 4K? It's all about the video, baby

I originally wanted to devote at least one story to a qualitative analysis of the Retina iMac's screen, including a list of physical measurements (gamut, gamma, intensity, and anything else I could measure). However, although I measured like a crazy fiend, my hopes of a constructive analysis were dashed when my expert--Dr. Ray Soneira of DisplayMate--told me that the data gathered was mostly unusable. Primarily, it's due to my choice of instruments. Sadly, our Spyder4 Elite just wasn't quite up to the task. -- Ars Technica.

Some OS X Yosemite Users Plagued With Wi-Fi Connection Issues

Some OS X Yosemite Users Plagued With Wi-Fi Connection Issues

Since OS X Yosemite's October 16 launch, MacRumors has been receiving a number of complaints from users who have been experiencing Wi-Fi issues. Extensive threads about Wi-Fi problems have surfaced on both the MacRumors forums and on Apple's own Support Communities as well, suggesting there are quite a few users who are seeing Wi-Fi connection issues after installing Yosemite. -- Mac Rumors.

How to uninstall App Store apps from the command line

How to uninstall App Store apps from the command line

The App Store offers a quick way to find and install applications on your Mac, but Apple does not have an interface for removing any of the programs you have added. While the App Store downloads applications, you must resort to methods other than the App Store program for removing your purchases. -- MacIssues.

Apple Files Patents that Advance Haptics & New iOS Metaphors

Apple Files Patents that Advance Haptics & New iOS Metaphors

The US Patent & Trademark Office published two patent applications from Apple today that reveal their ongoing work regarding advanced haptics and new iOS interface elements and metaphors for consumers and the enterprise. At a basic level, Apple's advanced haptics invention may have played a role in Apple's new Apple Watch. -- Patently Apple.

How Apple Watch Is Really a Regression In Watchmaking

How Apple Watch Is Really a Regression In Watchmaking

Nerval's Lobster writes Apple design chief Jony Ive has spent the past several weeks talking up how the Apple Watch is an evolution on many of the principles that guided the evolution of timepieces over the past several hundred years. But the need to recharge the device on a nightly basis, now confirmed by Apple CEO Tim Cook, is a throwback to ye olden days, when a lady or gentleman needed to keep winding her or his pocket-watch in order to keep it running. Watch batteries were supposed to bring "winding" to a decisive end, except for that subset of people who insist on carrying around a mechanical timepiece. But with Apple Watch's requirement that the user constantly monitor its energy, what's old is new again. Will millions of people really want to charge and fuss with their watch at least once a day? -- Dice.

iCloud: If your OS X Mail mailbox gets full

iCloud: If your OS X Mail mailbox gets full

If you use the Mail app on your Mac to receive iCloud Mail and your iCloud storage fills up, you won't be able to receive new mail until you make more iCloud storage space available. -- Apple Support.

The Worst Bugs in OS X Yosemite and How to Fix Them

The Worst Bugs in OS X Yosemite and How to Fix Them

There's a lot to like about OS X Yosemite, Apple's brand-new, super-powerful operating system of the future, but a quick glance around the software's official support forums shows that not all users are having a trouble-free experience. If you're struggling with strange bugs and quirks in Yosemite then these are the fixes you can try. -- Gizmodo.

iPhone 6 vs Plus vs iPhone 5S vs 5C: Apple Buyers Guide 2014

iPhone 6 vs Plus vs iPhone 5S vs 5C: Apple Buyers Guide 2014

The iPhone 6 and Plus have arrived, while Apple has also opted to keep its iPhone 5S and 5C around for another cycle. With four iPhone models to choose from at various prices, picking the right one for you is more complex than ever. The price points are all over the place (including free), there are now three different screen sizes involved, and some of the hardware models involved are quite a bit worthier than others. Here's out 2014 iPhone Buyers Guide to help you navigate the increasingly sprawling product line. -- Stabley Times.

October 30 Thursday's News

 

How Apple Pay and Google Wallet actually work

How Apple Pay and Google Wallet actually work

It's hard to have a meaningful discussion about Apple Pay (iOS' most recent foray into mobile payments) and Google Wallet (Android's three-year-old platform that's had tepid success) without talking about how the systems actually work. And to talk about how those systems work, we have to know how credit card charges work.

It seems like a simple thing, especially in the US--swipe your card, wait a second or two for authorization, walk out of the store with your goods. But the reality is that a complicated system of different companies handles all that transaction information before your receipt ever gets printed. -- Ars Technica.

A week with Apple Pay

A week with Apple Pay

Back in 2011 when I worked for PC World, Google gave me a Sprint Nexus S 4G review unit with the brand-new Google Wallet app on it. I set up a pre-paid card and took the phone around to a handful of retailers around downtown San Francisco, testing to see how paying with a phone worked in the real world. -- Ars Technica.

Review: The iPad Air 2 is so good, it almost disappears

Review: The iPad Air 2 is so good, it almost disappears

The new iPad Air 2 and iPad mini 3 are great examples of Ive's long-stated design philosophy, which is to get the hardware out of the way so users can concentrate on what they are doing, what they are looking at, the content. -- Cult of Mac.

OS X Yosemite: Using Mail's Awesome New Markup Feature

OS X Yosemite: Using Mail's Awesome New Markup Feature

With Apple Mail under Yosemite, you can add shapes, text, and highlights to attachments right in the composing window, without having to annotate the file before you insert it into an email. Heck, you can even crop images and insert your signature! This handy-dandy new feature is what we'll discuss in today's Quick Tip. -- The Mac Observer.

FCC Rule Change Could Turn Apple TV into A Cable TV Competitor

FCC Rule Change Could Turn Apple TV into A Cable TV Competitor

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has proposed a change to the rules controlling who broadcasters sell content to, and would bar them from refusing to sell to Internet-based providers. That translates to a big opportunity for Apple to add new channels to Apple TV without cutting deals with cable providers like Comcast. -- The Mac Observer.

iOS 8: Fixing Bluetooth Headset Connection Issues

iOS 8: Fixing Bluetooth Headset Connection Issues

iOS 8 brought us plenty of cool new features, and a few annoyances, too, like dropped Bluetooth headset connections. There's a fix for that tucked away in iOS 8's settings, but it isn't where you'd think to look. -- The Mac Observer.

The 3 Unexpected Consequences of Apple Pay Will be Huge

The 3 Unexpected Consequences of Apple Pay Will be Huge

Apple Pay isn't just a new mobile payment method. It's also a stake in the heart of merchants who want to use your purchase activity for their own ends. It gives companies who want to honor the customer a high-profile bandwagon to jump on. Finally, it punctuates Apple's leadership. John Martellaro looks at the unexpected consequences of Apple Pay. -- The Mac Observer.

AT&T, Verizon Using 'Perma-Cookies' to Track Customer Web Activity

AT&T, Verizon Using 'Perma-Cookies' to Track Customer Web Activity

Both Verizon and AT&T appear to be engaging in some unsavory customer tracking techniques, using unique identifying numbers to deliver targeted advertisements to customers in what's called "Relevant Advertising." As outlined by Wired, Verizon is altering the web traffic of its customers by inserting a Unique Identifier Header or UIDH, a temporary serial number that lets advertisers identify Verizon users on the web.

According to Jacob Hoffman-Andrews of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the UIDH serves as a "perma-cookie" that can be read by any web server to "build a profile" of internet habits. Verizon users cannot turn off the UIDH, but opting out of the Relevant Mobile Advertising Program prevents the information from being used to create targeted ads.

Verizon has been using Relevant Advertising techniques for two years, but the tracking has gone largely unnoticed until recently, when extra data from Verizon customers was noticed. AT&T appears to be engaging in similar tracking activities, and is testing its own Relevant Advertising system. -- Mac Rumors.

How to Use AirDrop to Share Files Between Macs and iOS Devices

How to Use AirDrop to Share Files Between Macs and iOS Devices

Apple's AirDrop file-sharing feature debuted with the release of OS X Lion and allowed users to transfer files from one Mac to another without using email or an external storage device. The feature made its way to iOS devices with the release of iOS 7, and offered a simple way for users to share files like photos between iOS devices. Now, with the release OS X Yosemite, users can use AirDrop to transfer files between the Mac and an iOS device for the first time. -- Mac Rumors.

FAQ on fixing permissions in OS X

FAQ on fixing permissions in OS X

When you run into a slowdown or two on your Mac, or perhaps another problem, then one of the troubleshooting steps that is commonly and sometimes blindly recommended is to run a "Permissions Fix" routine in Disk Utility. This routine is fairly straightforward; however, depending on your system's setup you may be curious about repeated errors and warnings, or otherwise wonder about what happens when you run a permissions fix routine. -- MacIssues.

Must-Have Utilities for Mac OS X

Must-Have Utilities for Mac OS X

Here's my list of applications I can't live without on my Mac. It's the first thing I install when setting up a new machine. Maybe you'll find one you like? -- JackenHack.

How to Turn Off Your Mac's Annoying Call-Forwarding Feature

How to Turn Off Your Mac's Annoying Call-Forwarding Feature

Continuity, the new feature in iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite, is noble in its intent to make your Apple devices work together better. One of its key abilities is to let you answer messages or receive calls on whatever Apple device is most convenient at the time, be it your iPhone, your iPad, or your Mac.

Sounds like the future! But in the actual present, this can be a huge annoyance.

Let's say you have Continuity enabled on your Mac, iPad, and iPhone. A call comes in. All three devices ring at once. Or almost at once: Usually the iPhone rings first, then the iPad and Mac start ringing five seconds later. And if you answer the call on your iPhone quickly, the other two devices will continue ringing for a few seconds because of that delay. Worse, if your Apple devices are strewn around your home, you're suddenly surrounded by an overwhelming number of rings. It's the same with incoming iMessages. One notification becomes two, or three, or more.

If you're sick of this, here's how to turn it off. -- Wired.

Get a 3D Dock Again in OS X Yosemite (or a Transparent Dock too)

Get a 3D Dock Again in OS X Yosemite (or a Transparent Dock too)

The Dock is just one of a variety of aspects of the Mac OS X interface that was overhauled and flattened in Yosemite. Gone are the days of the 3D Dock, the new Yosemite Dock defaults to looking like a flatter version, much like the iOS Dock. If you long for the Dock with some dimensions or some transparency to it, you can use a free third party utility to get the 3D Dock back in OS X Yosemite, or you can even choose to make the Dock completely transparent. -- OS X Daily.

Capture the action on your iOS device with Yosemite

Capture the action on your iOS device with Yosemite

Today's tip is short but sweet-- how to capture the video and audio of an iOS 8 device that's attached to your Mac that's running Yosemite. This isn't the kind of thing that everyone will want to do, but it's great for app demos and presentations where you want to incorporate iOS capture. And the quality is better than anything I've achieved with methods that leverage AirPlay. -- Macworld.

Yosemite's Automation Improvements

Yosemite's Automation Improvements

Ray Robertson of Automated Workflows offers a good rundown of the automation changes Apple provides in OS X Yosemite and their iWork suite of apps. When you look at the mass of changes, including enhancements to AppleScript, Automator, and the addition of an all new JavaScript dialect for application scripting, it reads like a pretty huge update to the state of automation. So much for AppleScript being "dead" to Apple, huh?

A Few Words About Taking Notes On Mac, iPad, iPhone

A Few Words About Taking Notes On Mac, iPad, iPhone

Almost everyone takes notes, but not everyone takes notes the same way. How we take notes runs a spectrum from the old fashioned way-- pencil and paper-- to the digital tools on Mac, iPhone and iPad (or, PCs, smartphones, and tablets).

Many people take notes by recording the audio of a meeting, presentation, or lecture, and simply write down the highlights. I know that works, but it seems to double the time involved with notes (recording, writing, listening).

Recently I came across a Mac utility which was born on the iPad first. It's a notes taking app called Notability which lets you take notes many different ways; handwriting, keyboard, audio, sketch and draw, import and annotate files-- all at the same time if you choose. -- TeraTalks.

Dabbling in the future of payment: A week with Apple Pay and Google Wallet

Dabbling in the future of payment: A week with Apple Pay and Google Wallet

On Monday last week, Apple finally launched Apple Pay, the company's mobile-payment system that only works with the iPhone 6, 6 Plus and the latest iPads. (Though you can't use iPads for in-store payments.) Even though mobile payments have been around for several years now, Apple Pay is seen by many as a key step toward making paying-by-phone more mainstream due to all the increased attention. Seeing that I have an iPhone 6, I decided to use Apple Pay every day this past week to pay for everything from my groceries to a hot dog at AT&T Park during the World Series. Just to see how they would compare, I also tried using Google Wallet installed on a Samsung Galaxy S5 and a regular ol' credit card in the same locations. -- Engadget.

How to switch carriers on the iPad Air 2's Apple SIM

How to switch carriers on the iPad Air 2's Apple SIM

For those of you who like to surf cellular networks on your iPad over the Wi-Fi variety, the Pad Air 2 and iPad mini 3 come with a special bonus: Apple's self-titled Apple SIM. The nano-SIM is identical to your typical iPad cellular SIM, with one key difference: It supports on-the-fly connections to multiple different cellular carriers.

That's right: You no longer have to decide before you buy your tablet which network you'd like to use it on, and can change it at any time. (Well, mostly. We'll explain in a sec.) -- iMore.

October 29 Wednesday's News

 

Apple hit with class-action lawsuit over 2011 MacBook Pro graphics failures

Apple hit with class-action lawsuit over 2011 MacBook Pro graphics failures

A long-running issue with owners of Apple's 2011 series of MacBook Pros has resulted in a class-action lawsuit, seeking compensation for apparent graphics card failures experienced by customers. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's Greg Joswiak blames iOS 8.0.1 issues on software distribution

Apple's Greg Joswiak blames iOS 8.0.1 issues on software distribution

In a rare interview on Tuesday, Apple VP of iPhone, iPod, and iOS Product marketing Greg "Joz" Joswiak mostly toed the company line, but did reveal that issues with last month's iOS 8.0.1 rollout were caused by software distribution issues. -- AppleInsider.

iFixit tears open the Retina iMac to see what makes it tick

iFixit tears open the Retina iMac to see what makes it tick

There's new Apple hardware out, and the people at iFixit are once again doing what they do best: disassembling the living crap out of it and posting pictures. This time, they've carefully torn down a new Retina iMac into its component pieces, and the images are illuminating.

HTML5 specification finalized, squabbling over specs continues

HTML5 specification finalized, squabbling over specs continues

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the industry group that oversees the development of the specs used on the Web, today announced that the fifth major version of the hypertext markup language specification, HTML5, was today given Recommendation status, W3C's terminology for a final, complete spec.

The last version of HTML was 4.01, released in December 1999, making it almost fifteen years between updates. That's a long time to wait. The story of HTML5's development was a messy affair. After HTML 4.01, W3C embarked on XHTML, an update to HTML that incorporated various XML features such as stricter validation of Web pages, and which was intended to make HTML "modular," broken down into a range of sub-specifications.

XHTML wasn't particularly compatible with the real world, however--Web pages that are, per the specs, broken are abundant, and under XHTML rules, browsers should refuse to display such pages entirely--and many in the Web community felt that W3C had lost its way, and was irrelevant to the needs of real Web developers. -- Ars Technica.

Here's our first look at Microsoft Office for Mac updated for OS X Yosemite

Here's our first look at Microsoft Office for Mac updated for OS X Yosemite

OS X Yosemite's Mail app is a Mac-crashing memory hog, but that might be good news for Microsoft -- it appears from new leaked images that Redmond is readying a special version of Outlook built especially for the new Apple OS X. And Office probably won't be far behind. -- Cult of Mac.

More tips and tricks for mastering OS X Yosemite

More tips and tricks for mastering OS X Yosemite

Whether you're a Mac novice or a seasoned veteran, there are a ton of tips and ticks out there for mastering OS X Yosemite. In Part 2 of our Yosemite tip series, we gather more of the very best. -- Cult of Mac.

All methods for restarting and shutting down your Mac

All methods for restarting and shutting down your Mac

While shutting down and restarting your computer might sound trivial, and are perhaps obvious tasks in most cases, there are a number of ways to go about doing these on your Mac, many of which you might not be aware of.

Some of the approaches for shutting down and restarting may be preferred in most situations, but others might be better suited when your Mac is unresponsive, or is otherwise in a jam where the standard options are either not available or not working properly. -- MacIssues.

How to Cook Everything, the (almost) perfect iOS cookbook

How to Cook Everything, the (almost) perfect iOS cookbook

We write reviews when a great new app comes out, but there are also older ones that we think worthy of recommendation, and How to Cook Everything is one of those. -- 9to5Mac.

Plex iOS app updated w/ support for iPhone 6/6 Plus resolutions, iOS 8 & Chromecast improvements

Plex iOS app updated w/ support for iPhone 6/6 Plus resolutions, iOS 8 & Chromecast improvements

Plex, the popular media server software, today gets an updated iOS app that brings full support for the new iPhone 6 and 6 Plus. That means that the app now supports the higher resolutions of the new iPhones providing more screen real estate for content on the larger 4.7 and 5.5-inch displays. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple sacrifices data privacy for convenience: Did Apple tell you that OS X 10.10 was sending unsaved documents to the cloud?

Apple sacrifices data privacy for convenience: Did Apple tell you that OS X 10.10 was sending unsaved documents to the cloud?

When I first heard about Jeffrey Paul's claim [NSFW] that OS X 10.10 Yosemite was leaking data to Apple's servers, my first reaction was "yeah, yeah - that's the way autosave is supposed to work."

But I was wrong. -- iTWire.

How to Get Handoff to Actually Work in OS X Yosemite

How to Get Handoff to Actually Work in OS X Yosemite

If you're anything like me, you were really excited to try out the new Handoff feature in OS X Yosemite and iOS 8. And you were equally disappointed when you updated all of your software, and the damn thing didn't work. Fear not, fellow computer user! With Apple's help, I managed to get Handoff working, and you can too. -- Gizmodo.

Why Quicksilver Never Caught On With Most Mac Users

Why Quicksilver Never Caught On With Most Mac Users

One of my favorite Mac utilities is also the most difficult app I've ever tried (and failed often) to master. This power app is called Quicksilver and billed as a productivity app though you're likely to lose some productivity while trying to improve your productivity. -- McSolo.

How to free up storage space on your iPhone or iPad with iCloud Photo Library

How to free up storage space on your iPhone or iPad with iCloud Photo Library

iCloud Photo Library, part of Apple's iCloud service, now gives you a more convenient way to organize and store all your photos and videos across all your devices. Make an edit on your iPhone, and it's automatically updated on your iPad. Not only that, iCloud Photo Library gives you the option to only keep storage optimized copies of your photos and videos if you choose in order to save storage space. For some people, that could mean a few gigabytes of extra storage. All you've got to do is change some settings! -- iMore.

How to disable taking iPhone calls on your iPad

How to disable taking iPhone calls on your iPad

While there are a number of how-to's on the topic of enabling your iPad to take iPhone calls in iOS 8, there are unfortunately a lot of people spreading FUD about the ability to turn it off. Yes, you can turn it off. It's the same as turning it on, but you switch to OFF... So, no, this isn't a "conspiracy" as some have called it, to "get you to create more Apple IDs!!!" Yes, these people love those exclamation points. And yes, people are actually positing this conspiracy theory in Apple's forums. Sigh. -- TUAW.

October 28 Tuesday's News

 

Apple grants iPads, Macs, Apple TVs, more to 114 US schools in ConnectED initiative

Apple grants iPads, Macs, Apple TVs, more to 114 US schools in ConnectED initiative

As part of its participation in President Barack Obama's ConnectED technology in education program, Apple is giving its latest hardware, as well as services and infrastructure, to 114 schools across the U.S. -- Apple PR.

The Retina iMac and its 5K display…as a gaming machine?

The Retina iMac and its 5K display…as a gaming machine?

A few weeks ago, Apple updated its iMac desktop line with "Retina" displays--an Apple marketing term used to denote LCDs with a pixel density high enough that individual display elements are invisible to the unaided eye at typical viewing distances. On Apple's iPhones, the "Retina" moniker means a PPI of at least 300; for MacBook Pro portables, it means about 220. The new iMac's 27" 5120x2880 LCD panel has a PPI of 218, putting it just below the 15" MacBook Pro's 220 PPI.

Those numbers translating into a stunning screen is unsurprising, and now that I've got one on my desk to play with, I'll absolutely add my voice to the chorus of other reviewers saying that the new iMac looks amazing. I haven't yet attached a colorimeter to the display and gone to town--that's coming in the next few days--but here's the color space information right out of the box. -- Ars Technica.

Once you see this small typography tweak Apple made in OS X Yosemite, you can't un-see it

Once you see this small typography tweak Apple made in OS X Yosemite, you can't unsee it

Apple pays more attention to the details then anyone else. Sometimes the details they pay attention to are so small, you don't notice them at all for a long time… but once you see what they've done, you can never un-see it, or accept anything less. -- Cult of Mac.

OS X Yosemite's Mail app is a Mac-crashing memory hog

OS X Yosemite's Mail app is a Mac-crashing memory hog

OS X Yosemite is supposed to make Macs run more efficiently than ever, but some early up-graders have discovered a huge memory leak that causes memory pressure to skyrocket and productivity to drop.

The updated Mail app appears to be the culprit of the memory leak that is triggered whenever multiple files are dragged into an email to be added as attachments. Over 100 hundred users have confirmed the memory leak on Apple's Support forum with screenshots of Mail hogging up to 24GB of RAM. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple's NFC Ambitions Extend Beyond Apple Pay to Building Security, Transit Ticketing

Apple's NFC Ambitions Extend Beyond Apple Pay to Building Security, Transit Ticketing

Apple is pushing NFC in the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus for Apple Pay, but the company may have bigger plans for the wireless technology beyond mobile payments. A report from The Information claims Apple has been in talks with technology providers about using NFC for building security access and public transit ticketing.

FileVault bug makes Yosemite pause or hang at login

FileVault bug makes Yosemite pause or hang at login

After having upgraded to OS X Yosemite, a number of people have found their Macs now take a relatively long time to log in. While powering on the system will reveal the login screen almost immediately, after supplying an account password the system will show a progress bar and hang for up to a couple of minutes, before finally showing the desktop and allowing the computer to be used. -- MacIssues.

Apple Granted 39 Patents Today Covering the Secure Enclave for Apple Pay, Tempered iDevice Cover Glass and More

Apple Granted 39 Patents Today Covering the Secure Enclave for Apple Pay, Tempered iDevice Cover Glass and More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 39 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover three inventions. The first covers Apple's iDevice chemical tempered glass. The second covers a halogen-free flame retardant material for Apple hardware. The third patent covers Apple's secure enclave used to protect both a user's fingerprint and information regarding safe transactions for Apple Pay. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

The Real Reason Some Merchants Are Blocking Apple Pay... for Now

The Real Reason Some Merchants Are Blocking Apple Pay... for Now

Some retailers not only refuse to directly support Apple Pay, they deliberately block use even when their cash registers accidentally support it. It's not a reaction to Apple, but a direct response to mistreatment by the credit card brands. -- TidBITS.

Apple's OS X Yosemite slurps Unsaved docs into iCloud

Apple's OS X Yosemite slurps Unsaved docs into iCloud

Apple's OSX 10.10 -- aka Yosemite -- is silently uploading users' unsaved documents and the email addresses of their contacts to Apple's iCloud, according to security researcher Jeffrey Paul.

Berlin-based Paul said the discovered the document auto-syncing without consent issue, and another hacker expanded the point by discovering that email contact addresses were also getting saved. -- The Register.

A Look At OS X Yosemite And iOS 8.1

A Look At OS X Yosemite And iOS 8.1

It has been a busy year for Apple, although one could argue it has been more of a busy few months. The yearly updates for most of Apple's products now occur in September and October, and as a result we've seen the release of a number of new products and services in a very short period of time. On the hardware side we have the new iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, the iPad Air 2 and Mini 3, the iMac with Retina 5K display, and a preview of the upcoming Apple Watch. The software side has arguably been even more exciting with the release of iOS 8 and its first major update iOS 8.1, OS X Yosemite, and Apple Pay. -- AnandTech.

How to use iCloud Drive

How to use iCloud Drive

Much as you may have been satisfied with the way iCloud synced your data in the past, if you'd hoped for comprehensive file syncing between your Mac, iOS devices, and the cloud, you were likely frustrated. Prior to OS X 10.10 Yosemite, iCloud's file storage was sandboxed, meaning that you could only access files created with a specific application by that application. You could, for example, launch Pages and access the Pages files you stored in the cloud, but you couldn't use that same app to open TextEdit files stored in iCloud.

Enter iCloud Drive. Taking its cue from Dropbox, which is a simple file repository accessible from any app, Apple has changed the way iCloud manages files. -- Macworld.

New Macs: Primate Labs' Mac benchmark chart updated

New Macs: Primate Labs' Mac benchmark chart updated

Primate Labs has just updated their Mac Benchmarks to include the new iMac (27-inch Retina) and Mac mini (Late 2014).

The iMac with Retina display tops out at 16,315* in 64-bit multi-core mode and the Mac mini at 7,300*. -- Primate Labs.

21 iPhone 6 Plus Tips, Tricks & Hidden Features

21 iPhone 6 Plus Tips, Tricks & Hidden Features

Learn how to use the iPhone 6 Plus better with this list of iPhone 6 Plus tips and tricks that will help users learn what they can do with the new iPhone. The larger iPhone 6 Plus display makes it easier to use some iPhone features and Apple packs in a few cool new iPhone 6 Plus features you might miss if you are new to the iPhone. -- GottaBeMobile.

Top three security flaws with file sharing platforms

Top three security flaws with file sharing platforms

Can you imagine working in today's business environment without the ability to easily share files across any platform at any time? The days of thumb drives and other physical data transportation means are numbered. While the need for sharing data will always remain, as file syncing and sharing (FS&S) platforms continue to evolve, the methods for how we do so will need to change. -- AppleDailyReport.

October 27 Monday's News

 

Getting the most out of the revamped OS X Spotlight search in Yosemite

Getting the most out of the revamped OS X Spotlight search in Yosemite

One of the biggest changes in OS X Yosemite is Apple's Spotlight search, which has gained a completely new, front-and-center look, and also adds the ability to search well beyond your Mac. -- AppleInsider.

In-depth review: Apple's iPad Air 2 and iPad mini 3

In-depth review: Apple's iPad Air 2 and iPad mini 3

Apple's latest iPad Air 2 and iPad mini 3 incorporate Touch ID and support for Apple Pay within apps, with the same 10 hour battery life of previous models. The full size iPad Air 2 is also now 18 percent slimmer with an improved, antireflective display and gains a faster A8X chip, faster 802.11ac Wi-Fi and LTE wireless, a barometer, and a significantly improved iSight camera. -- AppleInsider.

Verizon Wireless injects identifiers that link its users to Web requests

Verizon Wireless injects identifiers that link its users to Web requests

Cellular communications provider Verizon Wireless is adding cookie-like tokens to Web requests traveling over its network. These tokens are being used to build a detailed picture of users' interests and to help clients tailor advertisements, according to researchers and Verizon's own documentation. -- Ars Technica.

Ralph Nader tells Apple to screw investors, not workers

Ralph Nader tells Apple to screw investors, not workers

Ralph Nader has a message for Tim Cook: Stop listening to Carl Icahn.

In a scathing letter to Cook published in today's Wall Street Journal, the former presidential candidate takes Apple's CEO to task for bending to the will of billionaire investor Icahn and issuing more stock buybacks, rather than listening to its workers and addressing the horrendous working conditions at its factories in China.

How to use OS X Yosemite to send texts from your Mac

How to use OS X Yosemite to send texts from your Mac

In the past, using the Messages app on a Mac could be an irritating experience. And what if a friend dared to send a green-bubble text from an Android phone? When texting from your Mac, messaging those friends wasn't possible until now.

In today's Cult of Mac video, find out how to enable Text Message Forwarding between your iPhone and Mac. With iOS 8.1 and Yosemite installed, enjoying this seamless feature is just a few short taps and clicks away. Find out how to do it all in this speedy tutorial. -- Cult of Mac.

OS X Yosemite: Handing Calls Off to Your iPhone

OS X Yosemite: Handing Calls Off to Your iPhone

For today's Quick Tip, we'll go over how Yosemite and iOS 8 will let you continue a phone call started with your Mac on your iPhone, so if you've gotta jet, you don't have to end your conversation. For those of you who thought they could use "I need to hang up my Mac" as an excuse to stop chatting with someone annoying, we apologize for this article. -- The Mac Observer.

Retailers to Apple Pay Customers: Shut Up and Keep Your Money!

Retailers to Apple Pay Customers: Shut Up and Keep Your Money!

Retailers are choosing to disable all NFC payments, including Google Wallet and others, rather than accidentally accept Apple Pay. This is happening because some merchants are choosing to use CurrentC instead, which forbids accepting Apple Pay. -- The Mac Observer.

How to Get 'Handoff' Working in OS X Yosemite and iOS 8

How to Get 'Handoff' Working in OS X Yosemite and iOS 8

Apple is heavily pushing its new "Continuity" features in OS X Yosemite that improve cross-platform integration between iOS and the Mac. The most significant of the Continuity features is Handoff, which allows OS X and iOS users to start a task on one device and swap to another one nearby to continue work. -- Mac Rumors.

Fix windows with controls off the edge of your screen

Fix windows with controls off the edge of your screen

One frustrating issue you might encounter when running OS X is if a window is placed or sized in a way that prevents you from accessing some of its controls. This can happen for numerous reasons, including adjusting your display setup, or performing an upgrade to a new OS version, or if some corruption in the window saved state configuration files prevents application windows from being restored correctly as part of Apple's Resume feature. -- MacIssues.

How to access your Mac's printer from anywhere

How to access your Mac's printer from anywhere

If you have a printer at home or at work that is configured with a Mac Mini, iMac, Mac Pro or other Mac that you have as a desktop workstation, then you might have found you can share the system's configured printer to have it work as a print server. This will allow you to easily print from any system connected to the local network; however, in addition you can use this to print to your printer from practically anywhere on the internet. -- MacIssues.

How to speed up a slow Yosemite upgrade

How to speed up a slow Yosemite upgrade

Whenever you upgrade a system there will always be times when configuration errors or incompatibilities may prevent specific features from working properly, such as a WiFi connection that is constantly dropping, but at other times more nondescript slowdowns may occur that have you questioning whether or not upgrading was worth it.

If you have just upgraded your Mac to OS X Yosemite and are noticing your system is running notably slower or choppier, then there are several steps you can take before you go about extensive troubleshooting efforts. -- MacIssues.

When iPhones Ring, the Economy Listens

When iPhones Ring, the Economy Listens

Beyond serving as Apple's biggest profit center, the iPhone is also a bedrock of consumer spending and the stock market.

Gloomy economic news and the wild swings of the stock market may be getting you down. But at least you can count on this: We've entered the sweet spot of the iPhone cycle. -- New York Times.

Pedometer++ Tracks Your Steps on the Cheap

Pedometer++ Tracks Your Steps on the Cheap

Want to track your activity level, but don't want to shell out for an expensive fitness tracker? You may already have one in your pocket, embedded in your iPhone, and all you need to access it is a free app. -- TidBITS.

AT&T confirms it locks iPad's new Apple SIM card after activation

AT&T confirms it locks iPad's new Apple SIM card after activation

AT&T has confirmed in a statement that the new universal Apple SIM card in iPad Air 2 and iPad mini 3 becomes locked to the carrier after being activated on its network. -- 9to5Mac.

Yosemite & iOS 8 How-to: Set up and use Instant Hotspot

Yosemite & iOS 8 How-to: Set up and use Instant Hotspot

Now that iOS 8.1 is out, with iOS 8.1 running on your iPhone, you can use your iPhone as a Instant Hotspot for your Mac (running Yosemite) and for your iPad or iPod Touch (also running iOS 8.1). This is one of the features of Continuity, which further integrates and connects your Mac and iOS devices. Continuity also includes Handoff, iPhone Cellular Calls, SMS Relay, and AirDrop. -- 9to5Mac.

Hate OS X Yosemite's look? Here's how to give it a classic makeover

Hate OS X Yosemite's look? Here's how to give it a classic makeover

With its candy-like icons, gradients, and transparencies, OS X Yosemite is a major departure from the look and feel of the Macintosh operating system. But if you don't like that look and feel, here's a few things you can do to make OS X look less candy-like, hearkening it back to the design language of OS 9. -- Cult of Mac.

Fix Wi-Fi Problems in OS X Yosemite

Fix Wi-Fi Problems in OS X Yosemite

Some Mac users who upgraded to OS X Yosemite have discovered a variety of wireless network connectivity issues, ranging from dropping wi-fi connections, to an inability to connect to the outside world despite being connected to a wifi router, even suddenly and strangely slow internet speeds. These network issues seem to occur most often on Macs that have updated to OS X Yosemite from Mavericks rather than those who performed a clean Yosemite install, which could suggest the issue has to do with improper network setting and preferences, or even a corrupted file somewhere. That's a good thing, because it should mean a resolution is fairly easy to implement, as we're about to show you. -- OS X Daily.

How to use Apple's Continuity, iCloud Drive and AirDrop to share files with yourself

How to use Apple's Continuity, iCloud Drive and AirDrop to share files with yourself

When you think of online sharing, you think about sharing your files with other people. Apple's iOS and OS X updates will show you how easy it is to to share with your other devices. -- Gigaom.

Top 14 Hidden Features Of OS X Yosemite You Likely Don't Know About

Top 14 Hidden Features Of OS X Yosemite You Likely Don't Know About

Yosemite has been released with a major design change in comparison to earlier releases of OS X. All these design changes however, are well complemented with some major under-the-hood improvements as well, so much so, that there are some slick features hidden away in the OS that some of you may have never come across.

We take a look at some of the best ones. -- Redmond Pie.

Why Apple's Productivity Apps Should Replace Microsoft Office for Mac Users

Why Apple's Productivity Apps Should Replace Microsoft Office for Mac Users

For years, Microsoft Office has been the gold standard for productivity software for business. If you took an inventory of the applications on most computers used in the corporate environment, chances are you'd find some version of Word, Powerpoint, and Excel installed on the majority of hard drives. MS Office has gotten so ubiquitous in fact, that it is installed on more than 85% of business workstations worldwide, making it as dominant in the productivity software space as Window is amongst operating systems. Fortunately, Apple has created a viable alternative to Office in the form of Pages, Numbers, and Keynote, collectively known as iWork. These apps provide most of the same functionality as Microsoft's software, but with the simplicity and ease of use that we expect from an Apple product. Here's iWork is the better software solution for Mac users. -- Apple Gazette.

Study Shows That Your Device, OS & Browser Can Affect The Deal You Get Online

Study Shows That Your Device, OS & Browser Can Affect The Deal You Get Online

Finding the best deal online can be a very time-consuming endeavor, and unfortunately, it's not one that can always wind up truly working in your favor. Many studies have been conducted in the past that have shown some major variances in online prices, based on a number of different factors. Even if you think you've found the best deal on something, a person standing right next to you could very well find one better. -- HotHardware.

How to use Calendar for iPhone and iPad: The ultimate guide

How to use Calendar for iPhone and iPad: The ultimate guide

Calendars help you keep track of what you're doing and when, which is why it's always been one of the core apps on mobile devices from the earliest PDA (personal digital assistants), to the latest iPhones and iPads. That why, when iOS launched in 2007, it included a Calendar app. Whether you simply use Calendar by itself, or whether you sync it via iCloud, Google Calendar, Microsoft, or something else, it's the default way to add and find appointments and events. -- iMore.