MacVolPlace
Since 1996 - Tennessee's Macintosh Resource
Macintosh Images
"Love is the greatest refreshment in life. -Pablo Picasso"

     AAPL: $128.46 (-1.955)

 

News Archive

News Archive
  then  
MacVolPlace RSS Archive feed

February 27 Friday's News

 

Apple announces 'spring forward' event for March 9, likely to talk about Apple Watch & more

Apple announces 'spring forward' event for March 9, likely to talk about Apple Watch & more

Apple on Thursday sent out invitations to members of the media, inviting them to a keynote presentation on Monday, March 9, where it's expected the company will give more details on the upcoming launch of the Apple Watch, and potentially unveil anticipated new products.

Apple's March 9 'Spring Forward' event will be streamed live from its website, Apple TV. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's iWork for iCloud goes platform agnostic, open to everyone

Apple's iWork for iCloud goes platform agnostic, open to everyone

Apple on Thursday removed the beta tag from its Apple ID creation tool, granting anyone, on any platform access to access to the iWork for iCloud Web-based productivity suite.

The rollout comes less than two weeks after Apple launched an Apple ID creation tool that enabled users access to iWork for iCloud on non-Apple devices, including computers and mobile devices running Windows and Android. -- AppleInsider.

FCC Votes in Favor of Net Neutrality Rules, Classifies Broadband Service as a Utility

FCC Votes in Favor of Net Neutrality Rules, Classifies Broadband Service as a Utility

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission on Thursday voted in favor by a 3-to-2 decision to enforce net neutrality rules that it claims will help protect freedom of expression and innovation on the Internet, reports Ars Technica. The FCC ruling classifies broadband service as a utility and prevents Internet providers from blocking or throttling traffic or offering prioritized service through so-called Internet "fast lanes" for payment. -- MacRumors.

Force-quit processes to fix a hot Mac with blaring fans

Force-quit processes to fix a hot Mac with blaring fans

Your MacBook has limited battery life, so what do you do when your system's fans suddenly crank on at full tilt, and you notice that your system is getting hotter and hotter to the touch? Generally this happens when you are in the middle of your work where you have a number of programs and windows open. You may also see the battery life remaining on your system drop to an hour or two at most when you expected to have quite a few more. In addition to a hot system, you may also notice slowdowns with other tasks you attempt to perform, though this will depend on the task and might not always be the case. -- MacIssues.

Putting a Dent in College Costs With Open-Source Textbooks

Putting a Dent in College Costs With Open-Source Textbooks

At a two-year community college, textbooks can equal 40 percent of tuition. Free or low-cost electronic books can cut that way back.

College students could save an average of $128 a course if traditional textbooks were replaced with free or low-cost "open-source" electronic versions, a new report finds. -- New York Times.

Apple Invents New Streaming Content App

Apple Invents New Streaming Content App

Today the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application that titled "Scrollable In-Line Camera for Capturing and Sharing Content." Today Apple offers a simple way to stream content via "My Photo Stream" that's part of iCloud Photo Sharing. In this latest patent application, it appears that Apple wants to expand photo and video sharing capabilities on iDevices by introducing a new Streaming App that is clearly shown in Apple's patent figures as separate app from their current Photo or Camera apps of today. Our report provides you with the basics of the new app and a link to the patent for those wanting to explore it in more detail. The app is apparently going to make it a lot easier to post your photos to websites in addition to being able to mark them up quickly with short comments. -- Patently Apple.

Apple patent is for secure provisioning of iDevice credentials

Apple patent is for secure provisioning of iDevice credentials

Apple has been granted a patent (number 20150058191) by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office for secure provisioning of credentials on an electronic device. The purpose is to make iOS devices such as the iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch secure for Apple Pay transactions.

Apple announced Apple Pay in September 2014, describing it as "a new category of service designed to transform mobile payments with an easy, secure and private way to pay." It works with the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus through a NFC antenna design, a dedicated chip called the Secure Element, and Touch ID. -- Apple Daily Report.

Get Office, Dropbox, and your photos to work together on your iPad

Get Office, Dropbox, and your photos to work together on your iPad

If you're using the current versions of Word, Excel, or PowerPoint on your iPad (but not, unfortunately, OneNote), you can easily open a file that's residing on your PC--assuming it's stored in your PC's Dropbox or OneDrive folder. Once you've set it up, your online storage service of choice is just one of the locations in your app's File screen.

But if you want to insert a picture into your document, spreadsheet, or slideshow, those locations aren't part of the equation. There's no way to get to your cloud-based photos.

The same problem applies if you choose to skip the apps and use the online versions of Office in your iPad's browser. But there too, you can't insert an image stored online without using the trick below. -- PCWorld.

Why An Apple Television Set Could Cost You Nothing

Why An Apple Television Set Could Cost You Nothing

Every time the possibility of an Apple television set crops up in casual conversation (which it does with amusing regularity in tech journalist circles), two main reasons tend to be put forward for why such a product will probably never be more than a myth.

One is that it would be difficult for Apple to put its own 'stamp' on something as essentially dumb as a TV screen. The other is that Apple couldn't realistically release a TV because it would be way too expensive to survive -- even with that 'bulletproof' Apple logo -- in a market that's become insanely, destructively price-centric in recent years. -- Forbes.

iTunes Stream Rebuffering

Why no

When I am listening to internet radio stations (wuot, wdvx, etc.) I get tired of iTunes stooping to rebuffer. It always seems to it right in the middle of something I want to hear.

The best explanation i found of how iTunes works and why this happens is if found on the Internet by R.S. and I think it is well worth your time to read it.

Some notions, but I don't do much Internet radio listening myself, and I don't have Lion up yet. Actually, I don't even have Snow Leopard because I have yet to acquire my first Intel Mac!

The rebuffering stream is caused by iTunes getting out of sync with a stream that it is playing. My somewhat dubious understanding of how iTunes handles streams is that it pre-fills a buffer, out of which it then plays at the designated speed, while simultaneously keeping the buffer filling from the incoming stream at whatever rate the data comes down the pipe form the streaming server.

As far as I can tell, rebuffering happens in three different situations:

  • The first is on initialization, when it tries to pick up a new stream and, I think, starts to play the stream immediately, before it has in fact filled the buffer. The root cause for this situation seems to be with the data stream rather than with iTunes, because it doesn't happen with some streams, yet it always happens with, for instance, Doug McKeen's Radio Glebe. Typically, there is no repetition once the buffer has been filled and the stream starts playing in earnest.
  • The second is when the quality of service between the streaming server and the listening client system drops below the rate at which the stream is being served. This can be caused by slow connections across the Internet (typically when there has been a major routing failure, and everything is suffering), but this is rare, unless you are listening to an obscure and distant station. It is usually caused by server overload, when the server runs out of either horsepower or bandwidth. This arises when there are too many concurrent listeners to the stream, and can only be solved by the broadcasting server either reducing the bit rate (quality) of the broadcast stream, or increasing available bandwidth from the server to the Internet.
  • The third is when iTunes gets its knickers knotted and manages to create a buffer over-run, necessitating flushing and then re-filling the buffer. When this happens (which is exactly what rebuffering is), the playing breaks off, and after the time required to complete the rebuffering, picks up approximately where it left off. Depending on the size of the buffer, it may replay several seconds of already played stream, or it may hit exactly where it left off.

If you are experiencing either the second case or the third. It ought to be easy enough to determine, because if it is the second case (server side issues) it will be peculiar to specific servers. If the problem only occurs on some radio stations and not all of them, then it is either the servers or the network connection. If you haven't changed anything except the operating system, and iTunes exhibits this behaviour for many radio stations, then it is a client-side issue.

If it is case three (client side problems), which it may well must be if the problem occurs with every radio station to which you try to listen, it looks like some aspect of Lion is at fault. This could be at the networking level for the handling of bit streams, in which case it will affect other programs that involve bit streams over the Internet. If you can watch YouTube videos or play MP3 files OK in your browser via a plug-in (not iTunes), that will pretty much rule out networking problems.

Which leaves iTunes. As I say, I am not running Lion, so the version that I am running is 9.2.1 (5), which is probably radically different from whatever you have. In my version of iTunes there is a way to set the buffer size: it's in the Preferences, under the Advanced tab, and allows you to set the buffer size to small, medium, or large. Crank the size up to large to handle bandwidth-related problems. That's all I can suggest for iTunes directly. You can probably also find a setting there to stop iTunes coming to the front when it encounters a problem.

iTunes 10.4 update has removed the buffer size options!

When Apple released iTunes 8 back a few years ago, many people said that exactly what you describe was happening, with the only thing that had changed in their world was the new major release of iTunes. This suggests that you may be out of luck until the development crew focus on code optimization, and put out a new release that fixes performance problems/issues.

Assuming you can find it, it might be worth trying to download an earlier release of iTunes, and installing it in place of the one that is giving you trouble.

Finally, if any of the radio stations you are listening to give you a choice of bit rate, pick a lower one than the one you are currently connecting to.


As noted above with iTunes 10.4 Apple removed the buffer size options.

Therefore the only way to change its settings is by using our old friend, the Terminal.

I have been testing it using different settings to find the settings that work for me and to see if it works at all. So far the jury is still out.

Open the terminal

To increase the buffer for stream type:

sudo defaults write com.apple.iTunes stream-buffer-size xxxxxx

and for the file:

sudo defaults write com.apple.iTunes file-buffer-size xxxxxx

Where XXXX is the number of kb with 1024 = one kb.

I am running these settings:

defaults write com.apple.iTunes stream-buffer-size 512

defaults write com.apple.iTunes file-buffer-size 512

This seems to have helped but time will tell. I may adust need to adjust it again, so watch this space.

You can adjust how much buffer you want. But if you put too much it will buffer will take forever to load so do not do 512000, it is too much.

[CAVEAT EMPTOR! YOUR MILAGE MAY VARY].

February 26 Thursday's News

 

GasBuddy & GreatSchools now providing data for Apple Maps

GasBuddy & GreatSchools now providing data for Apple Maps

Third-party data presented to users within Apple Maps may soon include local gas prices and school locations, thanks to new partnerships with GasBuddy and GreatSchools.

The new data sources for Apple Maps were recently added to Apple's official acknowledgement page for its iOS and OS X mapping solution. Their appearance was first discovered on Wednesday by AppleMapsMarketing.

Though gas prices and school information are not yet shown when searching on Apple Maps, the deals with GasBuddy/OpenStore and GreatSchools would suggest that Apple plans to integrate the information at some point in the future. -- AppleInsider.

Apple spotlights 'Focus' starring Will Smith, edited entirely in Final Cut Pro X

Apple spotlights 'Focus' starring Will Smith, edited entirely in Final Cut Pro X

Opening in theaters this Friday, "Focus" starring Will Smith and Margot Robbie was edited entirely using Final Cut Pro X?--?a fact that Apple has highlighted on the software's official website. -- AppleInsider.

Apple partner Imagination Technologies unveils new PowerVR 'super-GPU' with 512 ALU cores

Apple partner Imagination Technologies unveils new PowerVR 'super-GPU' with 512 ALU cores

Imagination Technologies, the company who designs the graphics processors used in Apple's A-series chips, unveiled the PowerVR GT7900 on Thursday, a so-called "super-GPU" that will power affordable game consoles, and could be a candidate for a future Apple TV refresh. -- AppleInsider.

Want to work for Apple? Here's the grueling hiring process ["It's a trap Luke!"]

Want to work for Apple? Here's the grueling hiring process

Apple can be an incredibly demanding company to work for, but just getting in the door is nearly impossible.

The hiring process for Apple retail is fairly lengthy, but according to UX designer Luis Abreu, landing a job at the mothership in Cupertino is an even longer, more grueling process -- which he just suffered through firsthand. -- Cult of Mac.

Day in the Life series mastermind reflects on 25 years of Photoshop

Day in the Life series mastermind reflects on 25 years of Photoshop

Photographer and book publisher Rick Smolan was 25 when he made the best picture of his young career while on assignment in Australia. It was a group of aboriginal children playing in golden light with a balloon on a red dirt runway. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple hopes 'real-time' maps will be a Google beater

Apple hopes 'real-time' maps will be a Google beater

For a long time, Apple Maps was a laughing stock. Then it started getting better. Apple ironed out the glitches, began updating Apple Maps every day, and introduced Flyover, which gave you a 3-D view of major cities as they would look from the sky. -- Cult of Mac.

iTunes Match users: it might be time to switch to Google Play Music

iTunes Match users: it might be time to switch to Google Play Music

It's not often that Google can be said to incontrovertibly one-up Apple in anything but search, but the company just scored a small but sizable advantage over Cupertino in at least one regard: music storage space.

On Wednesday, Google expanded its Google Play Music service to match, store, and stream 50,000 tracks, twice what Apple allows iTunes Match paid users. Even better for listeners with large libraries? Google Play Music is free. -- Cult of Mac.

Mac Users Have Fallen Out of Love with Personal Databases, But Why?

Mac Users Have Fallen Out of Love with Personal Databases, But Why?

There was a time, when we were all new to personal computers, that we loved to build and use databases. A computer is the perfect tool for that kind of record keeping. However, in time, we all drifted away from that activity. John Martellaro ponders the why of it all. [Easy. We used to have to write or own applications and DB's could do that. Now "there's and app for that."] -- The Mac Observer.

Podcasts Entering 'Golden Age' After Experiencing Surge in Growth

Podcasts Entering 'Golden Age' After Experiencing Surge in Growth

The continued rise of smartphone and tablet adoption and the addition of Podcasts as a stock app on iOS 8 has resulted in significant growth for podcasts in the United States, reports Ad Age. Overall consumption of podcasts experienced 18% growth in the U.S. between Spring and Fall 2014 as Americans now listen to approximately 21.1 million hours of podcasts per day, according to Edison Research.

How to handle multiple disks simultaneously with Disk Utility

How to handle multiple disks simultaneously with Disk Utility

Regardless of the number of storage devices you have attached or built into your Mac, you will likely use Disk Utility for formatting them when necessary, to partition and resize them for various purposes, and otherwise managing them. However, one limitation you might find when using Disk Utility is that it will only act on one drive or volume at a time. -- MacIssues.

Skype 7.5 for Mac adds 14 new languages, several performance improvements

Skype 7.5 for Mac adds 14 new languages, several performance improvements

Microsoft is releasing the latest version of Skype for Mac today adding support for over a dozen additional languages and performance improvements for users. Beginning with Skype 7.5 for Mac, the communication app will now feature localization for the following languages: Hindi, Turkish, Czech, Ukrainian, Greek, Hungarian, Romanian, Indonesian, Catalan, Croatian, Slovak, Vietnamese, Thai and Malay. -- 9to5Mac.

The Only Time He Has EVER Been Right

The Only Time He Has Ever Been Right

OS X Yosemite Hidden Feature Series -- Part 3

OS X Yosemite Hidden Feature Series -- Part 3

Continuing on with our series looking at features of OS X Yosemite that aren't as well known or documented, Part 3 will focus on features in Apple's Mail client.

Despite the graphical overhaul of OS X Yosemite, Mail as an app seems to function in similar way to how it was in OS X Mavericks and hasn't experienced the relocating of settings and options as much as some other apps. So there is no real learning required to get to grips with it for existing Mac users.

There are, however, some rather nifty new features thrown in. As I have mentioned previously, these may not necessarily be 'hidden' in the sense that you cannot 'see' them, instead the following features may not. -- Amsys.

Throw away your fax machine and use these apps instead

Throw away your fax machine and use these apps instead

When I was growing up, that screeching sound now most commonly associated with a dial-up modem wasn't emitted from a computer. The sound came from a heap of plastic and buttons called a fax machine. As digital communications took over, faxing declined, but some agencies and large corporations still rely on faxing documents instead of emailing them. Looking at you, government offices. -- Macworld.

Save any picture from the web to your iPhone or iPad

Save any picture from the web to your iPhone or iPad

Whether you're looking for a good iPhone wallpaper or want to share a gif you found online, there are lots of great reasons to save images to your iPhone or iPad.

Doing so is easy, but I'm still amazed how many people don't actually know how to go about it (my mother included). So, in case you're lost: Here's a quick tutorial on saving images to your device -- even the ones that won't let you save them through normal means. -- iMore.

Why are my lock, keyboard, and camera sounds not working?

Why are my lock, keyboard, and camera sounds not working?

Ever typed on your keyboard and noticed you weren't hearing any keyboard clicks? Or taken a photo and didn't hear the shutter go off? Maybe you locked your iPhone or iPad and didn't hear the closing sound? -- iMore.

Why SSDs are obsolete

Why SSDs are obsolete

Solid State Drives - SSDs - are a product of convenience, not good architecture. Storage systems need to be re-architected to achieve the highest performance of NAND flash and, soon, byte-addressable non-volatile memory. Here's an example. -- ZDNet.

February 25 Wdnesday's News

 

The big deal about "big data"--your guide to what the heck it actually means

The big deal about

There are three buzzwords that, if we had our way, would be stricken completely from the world: "cloud," "the Internet of Things," and "big data." Each of them was coined in an attempt to elegantly capture a complex concept, and each of them fails miserably. "Cloud" is a wreck of a term that has no fixed definition (with the closest usually being "someone else's servers"); "Internet of Things" is so terrible and uninformative that its usage should be punishable by death; and then there's "big data," which doesn't appear to actually mean anything. -- Ars Technica.

How to find your iPhone's last location even after the battery dies

How to find your iPhone's last location even after the battery dies

Picture this: you've lost your iPhone somewhere, but it's run out of juice and it's not ringing or vibrating when you call it.

You might think you're out of luck, but there's one function you can enable (or disable if you're into privacy) that will keep track of the last location your iPhone, even when it runs out of battery. -- Cult of Mac.

Entrepreneurism and the politics of hope

Entrepreneurism and the politics of hope

I'm an older guy with younger kids so to some extent I live vicariously through my friends, many of whom have children who are now entering the work force and some of those children can't find jobs. We're not in a recession, the economy is expanding, new positions are supposedly being added every day, but the sons and daughters of my friends aren't generally getting those jobs so they are staying in school or going back to school, joining the Peace Corps., whatever. Everyone is rattled by this. Kids don't want to move home and parents don't want to have them move home. Student debt continues to increase. Everyone wants to get on with the lives they thought they were promised -- the lives they'd signed up for and earned.

What changed? -- I, Cringely.

Chase announces over 1M wallets provisioned on Apple Pay

Chase announces over 1M wallets provisioned on Apple Pay

As part of JP Morgan Chase's 2015 Investor Day on Tuesday, the bank went over statistics relating to its credit card business, announcing it has provisioned over one million wallets on Apple's fledgling Apple Pay mobile payments service. -- AppleInsider.

How to check what kind of Mac you have

How to check what kind of Mac you have

When Mac systems are discussed online, you will often see them mentioned by their common name, such as "Late 2012," "Mid 2013," or "Early 2013," etc. These names suggest a model number, and sometimes are specific enough to identify your model in question; however, this is not the true model identifier of your Mac. -- MacIssues.

Apple Granted a Patent for Tamper Proof Liquid Metal Fasteners for iDevices, Macs and Beyond

Apple Granted a Patent for Tamper Proof Liquid Metal Fasteners for iDevices, Macs and Beyond

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 63 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a single patent relating to tamper proof liquid metal fasteners. According to Apple's patent, amorphous alloys can be used for making sports equipment, medical devices, electronic components and equipment, and thin films. More specifically, it could apply to future iPhones, the iPad, a TV display, Apple TV, Macs, or even the current Apple Watch and beyond. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted a Killer Patent Relating to Programmable Magnet Connectors for a MacBook Dock with Inductive Charging & More

Apple Granted a Killer Patent Relating to Programmable Magnet Connectors for a MacBook Dock with Inductive Charging & More

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 63 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a single killer patent that covers the whole area of programmable and coded magnet connectors which was also extensively covered in a second invention that we previously covered. The two patents share the same technological space that covers a vast range of both current and future applications from a MacBook Dock with inductive charging to Apple's robotic arm used to make the Mac Pro. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted 63 Patents Today Covering Haptics, a Unique Clip-On Device and much more

Apple Granted 63 Patents Today Covering Haptics, a Unique Clip-On Device and much more

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 63 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's patents for a unique removable clip that could provide any number of devices with an additional user interface like a TV remote and others. We also cover Apple's granted patent that relates to haptic alert devices having a linear vibrator. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

How-To Upgrade the SSD in your MacBook Air or Retina MacBook Pro, boosting size & speed

How-To Upgrade the SSD in your MacBook Air or Retina MacBook Pro, boosting size & speed

Over the past two weeks, I've written about the (surprisingly easy) process of adding solid state drives (SSDs) to radically speed up older iMacs, and the varied challenge levels of adding SSDs to older Mac Pros, Mac minis, and non-Retina MacBooks. Today's guide looks at the easiest SSD installations of all: the MacBook Air and Retina MacBook Pro. -- 9t05Mac.

If you can't send or receive messages on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch

If you can't send or receive messages on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch

You might see an exclamation mark next to a message you try to send, or you might not receive messages that someone sends to you. These steps can help. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

If Lion Server has share points and privileges you want to re-create on OS X Server (Mountain Lion), make a note of them

If Lion Server has share points and privileges you want to re-create on OS X Server (Mountain Lion), make a note of them

When migrating data and settings from Lion Server to OS X Server (Mountain Lion), previously configured share points will not be retained. Make note of any existing share points prior to migration.

If Lion Server has share points and privileges you want to re-create on OS X Server (Mountain Lion), make a note of them.

Record the share point setting, including which share points are for home directories. You may want to take screen shots of the settings in the File Sharing section of Server app. -- AppleCare Knowlege Base.

iOS: Forcing iCloud Contacts & Calendars to Sync

iOS: Forcing iCloud Contacts & Calendars to Sync

Having trouble with iCloud syncing? That's what we're here for. In today's Quick Tip, we'll cover a (very) simple trick you can try when new contacts or calendar events just won't show up on your iOS device. Trust us, throwing your iPhone out the window won't help, but this article just might. -- The Mac Observer.

Review: BBEdit 11

Review: BBEdit 11

When an app gets a new version number, you might expect a bunch of flashy new features, but simple text editor BBEdit has never been a flashy kind of app. It fits, then, that most changes in BBEdit 11 are relatively subtle adjustments to workflow, mostly designed to enhance productivity. -- Mac|Life.

Understanding the Mac OS X Keychain

Understanding the Mac OS X Keychain

Online services, banking, social media, encrypted hard drives, everything wants to know your password before allowing you access.

My list of login credentials is growing slowly and remembering them is not possible anymore. With the advance of the internet and the world of IT becoming so ubiquitous, security policies require stronger and stronger passwords that often need changing.

Well, Apple has the answer to that problem -- Keychain. -- Amsys.

Apple's Genius Bar to get smarter with 'Concierge' -- report

Apple's Genius Bar to get smarter with 'Concierge' -- report

Apple's Genius Bar is about to get a whole lot smarter -- and maybe even faster for some.

People will soon be able to walk into the Apple Store, explain their issue and receive an estimated wait time based on the severity of the problem, according to a new report. -- c|net.

9 essential Apple Message tips

9 essential Apple Message tips

Apple's messaging app carries a host of useful features, so I've pulled together 9 tips you may not have seen until now. -- Computerworld.

February 24 Tuesday's News

 

Stanford researchers develop method for tracking mobile devices using battery charge data

Stanford researchers develop method for tracking mobile devices using battery charge data

Privacy advocates have long tried to educate consumers on the perils of giving apps access to GPS data, but a group of Stanford researchers has developed a method to infer a device's location from a seemingly much more innocuous source -- battery charge information. -- AppleInsider.

Apple releases second beta of OS X 10.10.3 with focus on new Photos app

Apple releases second beta of OS X 10.10.3 with focus on new Photos app

Apple on Monday seeded developers with another beta version of its forthcoming OS X 10.10.3 update, asking testers to focus primarily on the new Photos app with additional attention paid to Wi-Fi captive network support and screen sharing. -- AppleInsider.

Apple provides developers with new iOS 8.3 beta, adds fixes for CarPlay functionality

Apple provides developers with new iOS 8.3 beta, adds fixes for CarPlay functionality

The second beta of iOS 8.3 was released to developers on Monday, fixing a bug found in previous versions that could cause issues when connecting to a CarPlay-enabled vehicle infotainment unit. -- AppleInsider.

Apple introduces emoji diversity options with latest iOS 8.3, OS X 10.10.3 betas

Apple introduces emoji diversity options with latest iOS 8.3, OS X 10.10.3 betas

Starting with the latest betas of iOS 8.3 and OS X 10.10.3, new alternate skin color options are available when selecting emojis of people and faces. In addition, Siri has added a host of new languages on iPhone and iPad. -- AppleInsider.

Apple reportedly buys digital instrument effects firm Camel Audio

Apple reportedly buys digital instrument effects firm Camel Audio

Apple has seemingly purchased UK-based digital audio effects maker Camel Audio, best known for the popular Alchemy synth plug-in, suggesting the firm's software may be included in a future version of Logic Pro X. -- AppleInsider.

Apple patent outlines mobile app data sharing and collaboration over FaceTime

Apple patent outlines mobile app data sharing and collaboration over FaceTime

Apple on Tuesday was granted a patent for a method by which two or more mobile device users can share and interact with app data in real time, including the ability to see each other's screens during a FaceTime call. -- AppleInsider.

The wild weird world of carbon fiber

The wild weird world of carbon fiber

As a perennial fan of "How It's Made" videos, my visit last month to GE's Global Research Center in Munich was particularly fascinating. Although the campus is not involved with any actual large-scale manufacturing, the scientists and researchers there do focus on finding ways to take manufacturing processes and make them better. There were endless miniature manufacturing nooks and crannies that we got to poke our noses into over the course of our week.

I came away fixated on carbon fiber. It's most famously used as a lightweight, high-strength construction material in exotic cars and aircraft, but it's becoming downright common these days. Today carbon fiber is in bicycles and golf clubs, and you can even get yourself a carbon fiber wallet if you're so inclined. But its growing presence in everyday life belies its beauty and complexity--there's nothing common about this increasingly common material. -- Ars Technica.

Apple's on the hunt for music masters who know their pop culture

Apple's on the hunt for music masters who know their pop culture

iTunes might currently be flagging compared to rivals like Spotify, but it seems that Apple has some big ideas to bolster its music services -- and unlike many companies in Silicon Valley, they're not going to be based solely on better algorithms. -- Cult of Mac.

How to kill Facebook's annoying app sounds on your iPhone

How to kill Facebook's annoying app sounds on your iPhone

You may have noticed recently that the Facebook app makes sounds. Like a post? Chirp. Refresh the news feed? Swoosh. It's like your iPhone got suddenly chatty and wants you to know that you're tapping on the screen with every blip and bloop. -- Cult of Mac.

Easy way to make a bootable OS X Yosemite drive

Easy way to make a bootable OS X Yosemite drive

There are plenty of reasons why you might need to make an OS X bootable drive. Maybe you're updating numerous Macs in your house and don't want to download the installer every time. Perhaps you've replaced the hard drive in your iMac and need to install a fresh copy of OS X. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Now Selling Updated World Travel Adapter Kit With Lower Price, No 30-Pin Cable

Apple Now Selling Updated World Travel Adapter Kit With Lower Price, No 30-Pin Cable

Earlier this month, Apple began selling an updated World Travel Adapter Kit, which offers a set of seven AC plugs and prongs to fit in different electrical outlets around the world.

The new kit that Apple's selling no longer includes a 30-pin to USB cable, and rather than adding a Lightning to USB cable, Apple has instead opted to ship the kit with no cable and drop the price by $10.

Apple's updated World Travel Adapter Kit includes seven pieces (up from six plus a 30-pin cable) and specifies that it supports outlets in Brazil in addition to North America, Japan, China, United Kingdom, Continental Europe, Korea, Australia, and Hong Kong. Apple has also updated the language specifying which devices the kit is compatible with to reflect its newest products.

Apple is Granted a Patent for their Seamless EarPods

Apple is Granted a Patent for their Seamless EarPods

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 63 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's EarPod invention. Apple's EarPods were formally introduced on September 12, 2012 and first shipped with the iPhone 5 with a remote control and microphone. They also ship with the fifth-generation iPod touch without remote and mic and the seventh-generation iPod Nano without remote and mic. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted Patents for Apple TV Conference Room Mode and Enterprise App Sharing with FaceTime

Apple Granted Patents for Apple TV Conference Room Mode and Enterprise App Sharing with FaceTime

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 63 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover two enterprise centric patents. The first covers Apple TV Conference Mode while the other covers enterprise centric app sharing with FaceTime. -- Patently Apple.

Computational Anthropology Reveals How the Most Important People in History Vary by Culture

Computational Anthropology Reveals How the Most Important People in History Vary by Culture

Data mining Wikipedia people reveals some surprising differences in the way eastern and western cultures identify important figures in history, say computational anthropologists.

The study of differences between cultures has been revolutionized by the internet and the behavior of individuals online. Indeed, this phenomenon is behind the birth of the new science of computational anthropology. -- MIT Technology Review.

Apple adds crash log reporting for developers in latest Xcode 6.3 beta

Apple adds crash log reporting for developers in latest Xcode 6.3 beta

Alongside releasing the second OS X 10.10.3 preview release and iOS 8.3 beta 2, Apple shared Xcode 6.3 beta 2 through the Mac and iOS Developer Center today. The latest beta version of Xcode, which developers use to build and manage software, includes a new crash log reporting system to show developers issues users may experience with their apps. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple to overhaul Genius Bar, changing appointments and using phones as pagers

Apple to overhaul Genius Bar, changing appointments and using phones as pagers

Apple will soon make a significant change to retail store Genius Bar appointments to improve the customer experience, according to several sources briefed on the upcoming shift. During the week of March 9th, Apple's United States stores will launch a new initiative called "Concierge" that replaces traditional walk-in Genius Bar appointments. Currently, a customer seeking Genius Bar assistance can walk into an Apple Retail Store, explain the issue to a check-in assistant, and get a specific time to return for an appointment… -- 9to5Mac.

Siri speaks 7 new languages in iOS 8.3

Siri speaks 7 new languages in iOS 8.3

Apple's second iOS 8.3 beta, which was pushed out to registered developers on Monday ahead of a public release later this year, enables Siri to speak seven new languages, testers have found. It also brings more performance improvements for older iOS devices like the iPhone 4s. -- Cult of Mac.

How to Rate Music in iTunes and iOS Devices

How to Rate Music in iTunes and iOS Devices

Some people listen to their music at random, or by selecting playlists that they've manually created. Some people only listen to albums. But others like to use more complex systems, leveraging smart playlists. They can play music according to one or more conditions, such as how many times you've heard a song, which tracks are new, or which have the highest ratings. Naturally, for the last condition, you need to rate your tracks. Here's how to do this in iTunes and on your iOS device. -- Kirkville.

911's deadly flaw: Lack of location data

911's deadly flaw: Lack of location data

In an era when your mobile phone can tell Facebook, Uber or even video games where you're located -- with amazing accuracy -- 911 operators are often left in the dark.

Your chance of 911 getting a quick fix on location ranges from as low as 10% to as high as 95%, according to hundreds of pages of local, state and federal documents obtained and reviewed by USA TODAY and more than 40 Gannett newspapers and television stations across the country. -- USA Today.

Accessible Apple: How The Apple Watch Will Improve Security for the Visually Impaired

Accessible Apple: How The Apple Watch Will Improve Security for the Visually Impaired

Unfortunately, even with all of Apple's efforts, cases like that of Nicholas Silver of St. Louis or this man in London are still far too common. Both men are visually impaired and had their iPhones stolen while waiting for public transit. These are classic examples of thieves seeking out victims they see as least likely to be able to react, and therefore easy pickings. -- Apple World Today .

See last Wednesday. --mam

February 23 Monday's News

 

How to protect your Apple ID, iCloud, iMessage and more by enabling two-step verification

How to protect your Apple ID, iCloud, iMessage and more by enabling two-step verification

Two-step verification adds an additional layer of protection to your Apple ID login by requiring users to enter their password plus a second, temporary number sent to a trusted device. -- AppleInsider.

Adobe Photoshop celebrates 25 years of image editing history

Adobe Photoshop celebrates 25 years of image editing history

Adobe's Photoshop notched another milestone when it turned 25 years old on Thursday, marking a quarter century since the venerable software brought digital image editing to the masses as a Mac exclusive. -- AppleInsider.

Apple announces repair program for MacBook Pro laptops exhibiting video issues

Apple announces repair program for MacBook Pro laptops exhibiting video issues

Apple on Thursday announced a new repair program for certain previous-generation MacBook Pro laptops suffering from distorted video, unexpected restarts and other issues, saying these faulty units will be repaired for free. -- AppleInsider.

SIM card makers hacked by NSA and GCHQ leaving cell networks wide open

SIM card makers hacked by NSA and GCHQ leaving cell networks wide open

In a new report on some of the confidential documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, The Intercept wrote that operatives from both the National Security Agency (NSA) and the British Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) joined forces in April 2010 to crack mobile phone encryption. The Mobile Handset Exploitation Team (MHET) succeeded in stealing untold numbers of encryption keys from SIM card makers and mobile networks, specifically Dutch SIM card maker Gemalto, one of the largest SIM manufacturers in the world. Gemalto produces 2 billion SIM cards a year, which are used all over the world.

Apple will fight iOS bugs with first-ever iOS Public Betas: 8.3 in March, 9 in summer

Apple will begin offering public beta builds of iOS soon

According to a new report from 9to5Mac's Mark Gurman, Apple will soon begin releasing public beta builds of iOS to consumers in the hopes of tracking down and squashing more bugs. The program will reportedly begin with iOS 8.3, the first build of which has already been released to developers, and will extend to iOS 9 after Apple introduces it at this year's Worldwide Developers Conference.

Reporter's Notebook: Yahoo, IBM, IEEE and me

Reporter's Notebook: Yahoo, IBM, IEEE and me

I haven't been writing as much lately. This has been for several reasons, some of which may surprise you. It's true I've had to spend a lot of time fending-off attacks from IBM corporate (more on that below) but I've mainly been at work on two secret projects. One is a new documentary series for PBS and the other a new technology startup I'm doing with a partner. The PBS series will be announced when PBS decides to announce it but most of the shooting is already done. The startup has taken the traditional VC route and looks, surprisingly, like it will actually be funded. Evidently if your idea is wild enough and your partner is smart enough it's still possible for an idiot (that would be me) to make it in Silicon Valley. This project, too, will be announced when the money is dry, hopefully in a week or two. -- I, Cringely.

OS X: Opening System Preferences with the Function Keys

OS X: Opening System Preferences with the Function Keys

In today's Quick Tip, Melissa Holt's going to discuss how you can use those funny little printed function keys on your Apple keyboard to open the System Preferences pane associated with each item. This is one of the fastest ways to access your display settings or your sound preferences, say, so come check it out! -- The Mac Observer.

iTunes 12: Changing Media Shortcuts on the Mac

iTunes 12: Changing Media Shortcuts on the Mac

There's a lot of customization you can do to iTunes 12's new interface, and in today's Quick Tip, we're going to talk about changing which media shortcuts appear in the upper-left corner. Don't need an icon for movies or TV shows because you don't have any? No problem! -- The Mac Observer.

The Digital Betrayal of the Consumer is Officially Out of Control

The Digital Betrayal of the Consumer is Officially Out of Control

This week we learned that with enough resources, organizations know no end to their lust for information via hacking. Attacking and penetrating the best protected systems is a high art, and if even the pros aren't safe, what are the consumer's chances? -- The Mac Observer.

Three Tips for Apple's Keynote App on iPad

Three Tips for Apple's Keynote App on iPad

Keynote is a great tool that allows even the beginner to create impressive slide shows for any number of reasons. Even if you are experienced at using Keynote on your Mac, there are some things that are different when using it on your iPad. The following tips should make that experience easier. -- The Mac Observer.

How to magnify your iPad's screen

How to magnify your iPad's screen

Even though content on your iPad should be mostly legible, there are instances where a magnifying glass would be useful to see some nuance of your screen. If you own an iPad and find yourself sometimes squinting at your screen to see some minute set of text, or the details of an image, then there are several built-in tricks you can use to get a better view of what you are looking at. -- MacIssues.

Fix your trackpad button suddenly being light to the touch

Fix your trackpad button suddenly being light to the touch

The multi-touch trackpad's on your MacBook should have a substantial click sound to it, and require a notable press to activate. Granted many people will have differing touches, but in general you should be able to swipe around on your trackpad without activating the button on it. If this is not the case and your trackpad's button does click inadvertently and quite frequently, then there may be some quick fixes you can try. -- MacIssues.

Lenovo and Superfish Penetrate the Heart of a Computer's Security

Lenovo and Superfish Penetrate the Heart of a Computer's Security

Security companies are doing a better job at surrounding computers with defenses. Now the fight has moved far inside the machine, where unwanted or malicious software is nearly impossible to detect. -- New York Times.

Rivals Google and Apple Fight for the Dashboard

Rivals Google and Apple Fight for the Dashboard

In the coming months, dealerships around the country will begin selling vehicles capable of running Android- and Apple-compatible dashboard systems. -- New York Times.

Apple Invents a New CarPlay/HomeKit Related iDevice System

Apple Invents a New CarPlay/HomeKit Related iDevice System

Today the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals a new system that will determine when a user has exited from a vehicle and automatically perform a series of tasks depending on the location that the user has exited. This invention will tie into future HomeKit and parking related applications. -- Patently Apple.

New Apple Inventions cover Biometrics and a possible Thinner MacBook Cover Hinge Supporting Cellular Connectivity

New Apple Inventions cover Biometrics and a possible Thinner MacBook Cover Hinge Supporting Cellular Connectivity

Today the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office published patent applications from Apple that cover a possible new MacBook hinge supporting cellular connectivity and biometrics related to Touch ID that could eventually extend to Macs. -- Patently Apple.

Could Apple be on the Cusp of a New Era of Remarkable Innovation?

Could Apple be on the Cusp of a New Era of Remarkable Innovation?

Close to a year ago we posted a report titled "Jonathan Ive: We're at the beginning of a remarkable time." The report was based upon a Time's article. The most interesting moment in that article was when Ive stated that Apple was at the beginning of a remarkable time, when a remarkable number of products would be developed. Ive further added that when you think about technology and what it has enabled us to do so far, and what it will enable us to do in future, we're not even close to any kind of limit. It's still so, so new. -- Patently Apple.

How Malware Can Track Your Smartphone Without Using Location Data

How Malware Can Track Your Smartphone Without Using Location Data

The way your smartphone uses power provides a simple way to track it, say computer scientists who have developed an app to prove it.

Location data is closely guarded by many smartphone users. Nobody wants to think they are being tracked even though they carry the technology to do so in their own pockets. -- MIT Technology Review.

Find the serial number of your Apple hardware product

Find the serial number of your Apple hardware product

Learn how to find the serial number of an iPhone, iPad, iPod, Mac, or other Apple product.

If you have the product and it can start up Depending on the product, you can find your serial number. -- AppleCare Knowlege Base.

Lenovo reminds everyone why it's better to get a Mac

Lenovo reminds everyone why it's better to get a Mac

Lenovo, by injecting Superfish adware into its Windows laptop PCs and leaving them open to man-in-the-middle attacks, has so fundamentally betrayed its customers that every one of them should immediately consider switching to the Mac. -- iMore.

Apple says Mac app makers must transition to ARC memory management by May

Apple says Mac app makers must transition to ARC memory management by May

In an announcement posted to Apple's developer portal on Friday, the notified app makers that all Mac App Store submissions will soon be restricted from using garbage collection in favor of the Automatic Reference Counting (ARC) compiler feature. -- AppleInsider.

How to keep your Mac safe from adware like Genio and Installmac

How to keep your Mac safe from adware like Genio and Installmac

Sluggish page loading, redirected web searches, popups you can't explain? Your Mac may be infected with adware, says a retail Mac expert.

I've had some choice things to say about "adware," software that redirects your web searches, and how to get rid of it. Annie Hayes (@abazoe on Twitter) is a Mac expert at iCape Solutions, the Apple Specialist reseller I work at. She has some more info for you. She was kind enough to link back to one of my pieces in her article about avoiding MacKeeper. -- iMore.

Prevent your Mac password from being bypassed

Prevent your Mac password from being bypassed

There are two security utilities that can prevent thieves from being able to reset your password to gain access to the contents of your Mac. [Remember, that for either of thise to work the thieves would have to have physical access to your Mac.]

A nefarious individual could purloin your Mac and bypass your user account password in order to access your data or wipe your system clean and begin using it as their own. It's possible to reset a password by booting into Recovery Mode or from an external drive.

Thankfully, there two precautions you can take to protect yourself and your Mac from intruders. One is a software-based encryption tool, and the other is a hardware-based encryption tool, both of which are built-in utilities of OS X. The software tool is a utility called FileVault, which you may already be using. The hardware tool is a firmware password you can set in Recovery Mode. -- CNET.

How I Became A Mac Power User

How I Became A Mac Power User

My first encounter with a Mac came about nearly 20 years ago. A friend's brother had a Mac PowerBook.

Years later, in college, I picked up a used PowerBook to replace a broken Windows PC notebook and that was that. In the years since I've owned about every modern era Mac available; from MacBook Air to iMac to Mac mini, but I didn't cross over into power user territory until recently. -- TeraTalks.

It's What To Use On A Mac To Add Multiple Character Voices To A Story Or Play

It's What To Use On A Mac To Add Multiple Character Voices To A Story Or Play

Here's a quick look at a couple of Mac apps that do what you won't find easily done in other Mac apps. Multiple voice narration. The first app is called, not surprisingly, Narrator, and what it does is remarkable for writers. It uses the built-in voices in OS X to read character lines in stories and plays. -- NoodleMac.

Faster WiFi Speed With Your Mac

Faster WiFi Speed With Your Mac

Most people today have their computers, phones and media players connected via Wi-Fi. But is your wireless network operating at the highest speed? Well, there's a couple of things you can do to increase both the reach and your connection speed with some simple configuration changes. Let's see if we can increase your Wi-Fi speed. -- JackenHack.

How to use iCloud Drive: The ultimate guide

How to use iCloud Drive: The ultimate guide

iCloud Drive is Apple's online storage service -- a place to keep all your files and access them from all your Apple devices, including your iPhone, iPad, and Mac.

If you're new to iCloud Drive and not sure how to get started, you've come to the right place. Follow along and we'll walk you through how to enable iCloud Drive, pick an appropriate storage plan, and how to better manage your files across your iPhone, iPad, and Mac! -- iMore.

How your iPhone can help keep your financial world in check

How your iPhone can help keep your financial world in check

Unfortunately, identity theft is often treated more like a natural disaster that cannot be prevented, than it is as a criminal act perpetrated by an individual; it is all about preparing for the inevitable and the cleanup that takes place after it happens. The villain is often times identified as the organization that allowed such an event to happen, sort of like blaming the weatherman for bad weather. As such, organizations are required to equip you with the tools necessary to clean up and defend your identity rather than help you find the individual that is attacking you. -- Gigaom.

Secret headphone shortcuts: Twelve clicks to control your iPhone, iPad, and Mac

Secret headphone shortcuts: Twelve clicks to control your iPhone, iPad, and Mac

The Apple EarPods that come with your iPhone or iPod touch can be used to control a wide range of features, including music, phone calls, and even Siri.

So can any other set of headphones, from Beats to Bose -- as long as they integrate the remote and mic hardware. The remote controls are great for accessibility, but they're also great for convenience. What's more, they also work with the Mac! -- iMore.

How Walking With Smartphones May Have Changed Pedestrian Etiquette [DUH!]

How Walking With Smartphones May Have Changed Pedestrian Etiquette

The phenomenon of 'distracted walking' -- pedestrians who walk while using smartphones -- has raised civic attention in the last few years, with Utah issuing fines and cities in China creating dedicated 'smartphone lanes' for walkers who need to keep up with Whatsapp on the move. This article argues that smartphone users have become so accustomed to other people getting out of their way that they will no longer negotiate for sidewalk space even when not using their phones. -- The Stack.