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August 20 Wednesday's News

 

Apple's sixth beta of iOS 8 is for carrier testing only - report

Apple's sixth beta of iOS 8 is for carrier testing only - report

While developers were not supplied a new beta of iOS 8 this week alongside the latest pre-release version of OS X Yosemite, Apple's carrier partners were in fact provided iOS 8 beta 6 for testing prior to the release of the golden master. -- AppleInsider.

Apple updates pro-level video suite with fixes for Final Cut Pro X, Compressor and Motion

Apple updates pro-level video suite with fixes for Final Cut Pro X, Compressor and Motion

Apple on Tuesday rolled out a point update for its Final Cut Pro for Mac professional level video editing software including a bug fix for Blu-ray handling, which was also applied to new versions of Compressor and Motion. -- AppleInsider.

Parallels Desktop 10 for Mac launches with OS X 10.10 Yosemite support, speed boosts, more

Parallels Desktop 10 for Mac launches with OS X 10.10 Yosemite support, speed boosts, more

Parallels on Wednesday announced the release of Parallels Desktop 10 for Mac with built-in support for Apple's upcoming OS X 10.10 Yosemite, faster Windows app performance, better battery life and immediate availability for existing users. -- AppleInsider.

5 Great iPhone Accessories for Runners and Hikers

5 Great iPhone Accessories for Runners and Hikers

Your iPhone probably goes pretty much everywhere with you, and that includes fitness-related activities like walking, running and hiking. That magical slab of glass and metal is already capable of tracking and logging what you're doing, but there are some great accessories and apps that can make your workout or leisurely stroll even better. Read on to see a few of Jeff's favorites. -- The Mac Observer.

Week of Who, Day Two: Doctor Stew

Week of Who, Day Two: Doctor Stew

For Week of Who, day two, I offer you an amusing web series called Doctor Stew. It's mostly Doctor Who themed, but it's got a fair amount of Family Guy animation style and humor. It's not Stewie as the Doctor or anything, it just rhymed and made for a catchier title. Keep in mind if Family Guy is not your scene, Doctor Stew won't be either. Otherwise, check out the first episode below. -- The Mac Observer.

Expand all collapsed items in a list in OS X

Expand all collapsed items in a list in OS X

There are many times in OS X when you will come across items organized into list, be it in Finder windows where you might have List View selected, or Mail messages that are organized into conversations. You might also find this in panels like the Finder info window's various categories, or in places in the system preferences. If you regularly use these lists, then you might benefit from a little trick to help reveal or conceal items in them. -- MacIssues.

Apple was Granted 48 Patents Today Covering Percussion Gestures, Surround Sound for the MacBook Pro & More

Apple was Granted 48 Patents Today Covering Percussion Gestures, Surround Sound for the MacBook Pro & More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 48 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's patent wins for percussion gestures for GarageBand and Surround Sound for the MacBook Pro. Additionally, we cover three of Apple's latest design patents and wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

In Defense of Email

In Defense of Email

Email is far from hip these days. Pundits and investors salivate over ways to replace it with something more modern, but The Atlantic's Alexis Madrigal argues that it's still the best part of the Internet. Despite its many flaws, it's universal, decentralized, and isn't commercial. In fact, Madrigal argues that it may be users' best hope of taking the Internet back from large tech firms. -- The Atlantic.

Security breach is not reason for Gatekeeper app signing changes

Security breach is not reason for Gatekeeper app signing changes

Yesterday there were a few claims going around that Apple's recent change to Gatekeeper app signing for developers was the result of a Dev Center security breach. TUAW reported yesterday on a few random tweets and others picked up the story. As you'd probably expect, we have some good news: It's not true...

We've now confirmed with sources close to the situation that there is no truth to the rumors and that a Dev Center breach was not the reason behind the Gatekeeper app signing changes. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple activates screen sharing over iMessage accounts in latest Yosemite beta

Apple activates screen sharing over iMessage accounts in latest Yosemite beta

In June, we noted that Apple is adding a handy new feature to the upcoming OS X Yosemite: the ability for iMessage/Apple ID users to screen share via the Messages app. Screen sharing was a hallmark of early versions of Apple's Mac "iChat" application, but it has always required an AOL Instant Messenger (AIM), Gmail, Jabber, or Yahoo account. With Yosemite, users can have the same screen sharing experience with just an iMessage/FaceTime/or Apple ID account. Apple activated the feature in this week's beta release, and it brings some new tricks not found in earlier implementations. -- 9to5Mac.

HealthKit integration in iOS 8 will pull in billions for Apple

HealthKit integration in iOS 8 will pull in billions for Apple

While there's no doubt that a TV or watch from Apple would be interest and disruptive -- and I'm in no way ruling out such devices in the future -- the health related additions to iOS will be far more beneficial to Apple in the short to medium term. -- ZDNet.

What Apple's new content delivery network means for net neutrality, and for you

What Apple's new content delivery network means for net neutrality, and for you

In late July, Apple reportedly brought online its own content distribution network (CDN), a way of pushing data files closer to end-users. A CDN can reduce the number of hops and the amount of intermediate bandwidth required to speed files and data--like an iOS update, a streaming movie, or a software download--between the content provider and the recipient.

All of that can be a huge benefit to the ordinary user, but it's not all upside. Given that a CDN either connects its networks directly with major Internet service providers (ISPs) or co-locates server hardware within ISP network operations, they can also raise concerns in terms of net neutrality. And Apple's venture is no different. -- Macworld.

Problems with Windows 8 in Boot Camp 5

Problems with Windows 8 in Boot Camp 5

Wesley Heiss was having problems with Windows 8 on his MacBook Pro, so he updated Boot Camp to the version that Apple says works with Windows 8. (See our report to see which Boot Camp 5 version works for your Mac.) Unfortunately, he receives an error message saying that only Windows 7 is support. -- MacWindows.

Parallels Desktop 9 failing to load under latest Yosemite preview

Parallels Desktop 9 failing to load under latest Yosemite preview

Yesterday's Developer Preview 6 release of OS X Yosemite is breaking Parallels Desktop 9, users complain. After DP6 is installed, Desktop 9 is simply refusing to run. The issue appears to involve the dispatcher service failing to load, as a temporary solution involves forcing the service to start via a Terminal command.

Desktop 9 is a Mac app that lets users run Windows apps without having to boot into a separate partition. Given its popularity, fixing compatibility will likely be a high priority for Apple before the next developer preview is released, or at least before the gold master. -- MacNN.

OS X Yosemite Beta (DP6) Review: Your MacBook Is About To Get EPIC

OS X Yosemite Beta (DP6) Review: Your MacBook Is About To Get EPIC

A few weeks ago I reviewed the first public beta of OS X Yosemite (that's now over on Page 2), and if that early release was anything to go by, the next version of Apple's desktop operating system is going to be EPIC. But while there's only been one public release of the OS X Yosemite beta, there have actually been multiple releases for developers. Called Developer Previews (DP), these releases contain more advanced features than are available to the public. And Apple just dropped the latest build -- DP6 -- into the hands of its developers yesterday. -- Know Your Mobile.

You can legally unlock your smartphone -- so now what?

You can legally unlock your smartphone -- so now what?

Smartphone owners, cast off your chains. Your beloved iPhone, your cherished Galaxy, your esteemed Lumia is no longer bound to one carrier forever. Earlier, this month it became legal to unlock your mobile phone--President Obama's signature says so--ushering in a new era of more competition, as customers can easily switch carriers. Say goodbye to exorbitant roaming fees when you travel abroad. Say hello to greater freedom for selling that old, unused smartphone that's no longer linked to a lone carrier for life. And get ready for more choice, as competing carriers win our allegiance through all manner of innovative service offerings. -- TechHive.

How to restrict Game Center with parental controls on your iPhone or iPad

How to restrict Game Center with parental controls on your iPhone or iPad

Game Center comes built into every iPhone and iPad and lets you play multiplayer games against your friends. You can also compete for rankings and unlock achievements. However, if you don't want small children adding people without your consent or playing games with people they don't know, it's a good idea to restrict what they can do within Game Center without your permission. -- iMore.

August 19 Tuesday's News

 

Apple releases OS X Yosemite Developer Preview 6, Xcode 6 beta 6

Apple releases OS X Yosemite Developer Preview 6, Xcode 6 beta 6

Apple on Monday issued its sixth beta releases of OS X Yosemite and Xcode 6 to developers for testing ahead of their scheduled launches this fall, though no new beta of iOS 8 was released.

People familiar with OS X Yosemite Developer Preview 6 say it comes with a number of new built-in wallpapers. Various system icons have been tweaked or changed as well, including in the System Preferences screen and battery icon in the taskbar. The new beta also adds a "Do Not Disturb" switch for Notification center. -- AppleInsider.

Delaware becomes first state to give heirs broad digital assets access

Delaware becomes first state to give heirs broad digital assets access

Delaware has become the first state in the US to enact a law that ensures families' rights to access the digital assets of loved ones during incapacitation or after death.

Last week, Gov. Jack Markell signed House Bill (HB) 345, "Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets and Digital Accounts Act," which gives heirs and executors the same authority to take legal control of a digital account or device, just as they would take control of a physical asset or document. -- Ars Technica.

This gorgeous and elegant bamboo gadget will turn any desk into a standing desk

This gorgeous and elegant bamboo gadget will turn any desk into a standing desk

If you're anything like me, you're probably interested in trying a standing deskā€¦ but not quite so committed to the idea of standing all day that you'd be willing to throw out your office chair.

Which is why I'm so interested in the Lift. Now on Kickstarter, it's a gorgeous and elegant wooden desk gadget that allows you to convert your existing desk to and from a standing desk at will. -- .

How To Label Locations in Find My Friends

How To Label Locations in Find My Friends

Find My Friends is handy, but it can be even more useful if you label common locations. Kelly explains how to do this and how they can even make Siri more helpful. -- The Mac Observer.

4 Ways to Restart the Mac Finder

4 Ways to Restart the Mac Finder

There are times when it's necessary to restart the Mac's Finder. (It is, after all, just an app.) Perhaps it's locked up. Or perhaps you've made a configuration change that requires a Finder restart. John shows four different ways to handle the Finder with a view to a kill. -- The Mac Observer.

Week Of Who: Doctor Puppet

Week Of Who: Doctor Puppet

Doctor Who, a popular television program here at TMO Towers, is returning with a new season this coming Saturday. Needless to say, excitement is high so I'm sharing some of my favorite Doctor Who tributes/parodies with you. Today we're kicking off the Week Of Who with Doctor Puppet, created by Alisa Stern. It's a series of stop-motion videos, starring the Matt Smith version of the Doctor. They are impressively adorable and since they aren't lengthy it's easy to get caught up. Check out Doctor Puppet's adventures starting with the first episode. -- The Mac Observer.

Convert various text file formats in the OS X Terminal with textutil

Convert various text file formats in the OS X Terminal with textutil

There are a number of ways you can convert a text document to another format, by simply opening it in a text editor like TextEdit and then choosing Save As from the File menu to export it. With TextEdit, you can choose Word, Rich Text, Plain Text, and OpenDocument Text, among others, as the formats in which to save your current file; however, if you are a Terminal user then you might enjoy knowing you can do this right from the command line. -- MacIssues.

Digital Divide: Inequality and Web Search Trends

Digital Divide: Inequality and Web Search Trends

An analysis of a decade of web searches shows the different subjects that occupy people's thoughts in a highly unequal country.

In the hardest places to live in the United States, people spend a lot of time thinking about diets and religion. In the easiest places to live, people spend a lot of time thinking about cameras. -- New York Times.

XRay: A New Tool for Tracking the Use of Personal Data on the Web

XRay: A New Tool for Tracking the Use of Personal Data on the Web

A real problem with personal data today is that the terms of trade so often seem both opaque and askew. Browse for information, send messages or go shopping online and data about you, your habits and your preferences go off into the digital ether.

A team of computer scientists at Columbia has developed a research tool for tracking the use of personal data online. -- New York Times.

Apple Granted a Major Patent for a Multimode Fingerprint Scanner Supporting Financial Transactions

Apple Granted a Major Patent for a Multimode Fingerprint Scanner Supporting Financial Transactions

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 48 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a major invention relating to a multimode fingerprint scanner. The first scanner is noted as being a "stationary" mode scanner designed for the Home Button as it is today for unlocking the display and making purchases on iTunes. A secondary scanner is shown to be set in a secondary location on an iPhone that is considered a "moving mode" scanner designed specifically for financial transactions and our report will tell you why Apple is seriously considering this new moving mode. Apple's granted patent also indicates that the financial system component supports NFC which is rapidly becoming the industry standard. Whether Apple will actually use this standard remains an open question. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted a Patent for a Curved Touch Display that Could Support a Future Fitness Band or iWatch

Apple Granted a Patent for a Curved Touch Display that Could Support a Future Fitness Band or iWatch

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 48 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's patent for making a curved touched display. The most likely use for such a display could be in the form of Apple's future fitness-band (wrist computer or iWatch). -- Patently Apple.

iCloud storage warning emails already referencing iOS 8 & iCloud Drive

iCloud storage warning emails already referencing iOS 8 & iCloud Drive

Those annoying iCloud storage warning email notifications have begun referencing the upcoming iOS 8 and iCloud Drive, according to multiple tips from readers. This change in the copy within the emails likely indicates that Apple is already preparing for the upcoming debuts of the new iCloud and iOS releases. -- 9to5Mac.

OS X 10.9.4 doesn't fix ACL file sharing problems

OS X 10.9.4 doesn't fix ACL file sharing problems

Jacob Snyder reports that the OS X 10.9.4 update did not fix his problems with changing ACLs on file servers when Macs access files. We've posted a lot of user reports of these problems on our Mavericks File Sharing Tips page, with some suggestions. Snyder refers to a link at the JAMF users forums. Snyder said this:

We still are seeing major issues with ACLs in 10.9.4. This thread at JAMF starts out with earlier versions of 10.9 and the ACL issues seem to get resolved with 10.9.3 and 10.9.4, but if you keep going down the thread you can see that the issues return for several users. I'm one of those users and I'm working with Apple Enterprise support. They can recreate the issue, but they still don't have a solution. The problem is so bad that I'll have to revert to 10.8.5 until there is a resolution. -- MacWindows.

How to find and delete duplicate photos in iPhoto

How to find and delete duplicate photos in iPhoto

Duplicate photos always seem to find a way to creep into your iPhoto library, eating up precious storage space on your Mac. You could just let it go and forget all about it -- after all it's just a few duplicate photos -- but if you're anything like me, you just want your iPhoto library to be perfect. -- iDownload Blog.

How to mend ... a cracked iPhone screen

How to mend ... a cracked iPhone screen

If the iPhone in your pocket is sporting a broken screen right now, you're not alone. Nearly a quarter of iPhones on the streets look just like yours. After the glass cracks, your options are pretty limited: either pay for an expensive repair, or keep swiping at the shattered glass until your fingers bleed.

There is a third option, however. One that most don't ever consider: repair the screen yourself. It seems like a daunting task, but it's simpler than you might think. -- The Guardian.

August 18 Monday's News

 

Are processors pushing up against the limits of physics?

Are processors pushing up against the limits of physics?

When I first started reading Ars Technica, performance of a processor was measured in megahertz, and the major manufacturers were rushing to squeeze as many of them as possible into their latest silicon. Shortly thereafter, however, the energy needs and heat output of these beasts brought that race crashing to a halt. More recently, the number of processing cores rapidly scaled up, but they quickly reached the point of diminishing returns. Now, getting the most processing power for each Watt seems to be the key measure of performance. -- Ars Technica.

Unemulated: Eleven classic arcade games you can't play at home

Unemulated: Eleven classic arcade games you can't play at home

Even with the minor arcade resurgence going on these days, the prolonged decline of the American arcade means that there's a whole generation of people who have had little opportunity to play any of the thousands of coin-operated games in their native cabinets. Even those who remember the '70s and '80s golden age of arcades probably only had the opportunity to sample a relative handful of games that were available at their local haunts. -- Ars Technica.

A brief history of USB, what it replaced, and what has failed to replace it

A brief history of USB, what it replaced, and what has failed to replace it

Like all technology, USB has evolved over time. Despite being a "Universal" Serial Bus, in its 18-or-so years on the market it has spawned multiple versions with different connection speeds and many, many types of cables. -- Ars Technica.

Apple Patches Safari WebKit Security Issues

Apple Patches Safari WebKit Security Issues

Apple released Safari 7.0.6 for OS X Mavericks and Safari 6.1.6 for OS X Lion and Mountain Lion on Wednesday to patch several WebKit-related security and memory corruption issues that could let attackers run arbitrary code on victim's computers. The security issue could also cause app crashes. -- The Mac Observer.

The Emerging War Over Desktop Push Notifications

The Emerging War Over Desktop Push Notifications

Push notifications may have grown up on mobile apps. But now the Web is making a comeback because of a push notification innovation introduced by Apple through Safari Mavericks. Warring standards are already beginning to emerge, though Apple holds the early lead. -- The Mac Observer.

An Amazing Customer Experience with Apple

An Amazing Customer Experience with Apple

Yesterday, John Martellaro's wife had a truly remarkable customer experience at the Apple retail store in Lone Tree, Colorado. The experience demonstrates something very interesting about Apple that makes it unique and hard to compete with. -- The Mac Observers.

Import bookmarks from another browser

Import bookmarks from another browser

If you want to use your bookmarks from a different web browser in Safari, you can export them from that web browser as an HTML file and then import them into Safari.

  1. Open the other web browser.
  2. Find the web browser's Export Bookmarks option, and then choose it.
  3. The Export Bookmarks option is normally in the File menu.
  4. Save the bookmarks as an HTML file, for example, "bookmarks.html."
  5. Open Safari and choose File > Import Bookmarks.
  6. Select the HTML file you created, and then click Import.

No Sooner do we Secure Our iPhones Than the Home Invasion Begins

No Sooner do we Secure Our iPhones Than the Home Invasion Begins

The pace of personal security continues to accelerate. First, we spent years learning how to secure our routers and Macs. Then we focused on our iPhone security. Now, a new wave of devices is poised to enter our homes, and they're not made by Apple. Danger is lurking once again. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple Reveals a New Audio System Designed for thin Devices which Could Mean the iPhone 6

Apple Reveals a New Audio System Designed for thin Devices which Could Mean the iPhone 6

On August 14, 2014, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple titled "Long-Throw Acoustic Transducer." Apple's invention generally relates to the field of audio speakers that use a moving magnetic piston as the sound producing element. The invention will be able to produce more vibrant audio for music and alerts with vibrations for future iDevices. Apple notes that their invention may be advantageous for acoustic transducers that are used in "thin" devices where the height of the acoustic transducer must be small to fit within the device. Theoretically that could mean that this was designed for the iPhone 6 and/or other future iDevices like the iPad mini and beyond. As far as the iPhone goes, we'll know if this was used or not the minute that iFixit does their teardown of the iPhone 6 in September. -- Patently Apple.

University Students Get a Deal if they buy a Mac before Sept. 9

University Students Get a Deal if they buy a Mac before Sept. 9

In a new email promotion, Apple is now offering students who buy a Mac before September 9 will get a $110 Apple Store Gift Card. They could also get another $55 if they buy a new iPhone or iPad. Why Apple isn't extending this offer to all students is a bit of a mystery.

Apple Invents In-Cell for OLED Displays & Touch ID for iPad

Apple Invents In-Cell for OLED Displays & Touch ID for iPad

Apple was granted a patent this week for their In-Cell or "Integrated Touch" display technology. Today, the US Patent and Trademark Office published Apple's patent application for their latest technology regarding "In-Cell for LED" or OLED/AMOLED displays. In a secondary patent filing Apple focuses on fingerprint imaging and quality characterization. One of the patent figures illustrates the iPad integrating Touch ID which is likely to debut this fall. -- Patently Apple.

The Biggest iPhone Security Risk Could Be Connecting One To a Computer

The Biggest iPhone Security Risk Could Be Connecting One To a Computer

Apple has done well to insulate its iOS mobile operating system from many security issues, but a forthcoming demonstration shows it's far from perfect. Next Wednesday at the Usenix Security Symposium in San Diego, researchers with the Georgia Institute of Technology will show how iOS's Achilles' heel is exposed when devices are connected over USB to a computer or have Wi-Fi synching enabled. The beauty of their attack is that it doesn't rely on iOS software vulnerabilities, the customary way that hackers commandeer computers. It simply takes advantage of design issues in iOS, working around Apple's layered protections to accomplish a sinister goal. -- ComputerWorld.

Pattern Recognition Algorithm Recognizes When Drivers Are on the Phone

Pattern Recognition Algorithm Recognizes When Drivers Are on the Phone

By some estimates, 85 percent of drivers in America use a mobile phone while at the wheel. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that during daylight hours, 5 percent of cars are being driven by people making phone calls.

Using a mobile phone while driving can significantly increase the chances of an accident. Now a dashboard cam can spot when drivers pick up the phone. -- MIT Technology Review.

Technology Can Make Lawful Surveillance Both Open and Effective

Technology Can Make Lawful Surveillance Both Open and Effective

With cryptography, surveillance processes could be open and privacy-preserving without undermining their investigative power.

Democracy rests on the principle that legal processes must be open and public. Laws are created through open deliberation by elected bodies; they are open for anyone to read or challenge; and in enforcing them the government must get a warrant before searching a person's private property. For our increasingly electronic society to remain democratic, this principle of open process must follow us into cyberspace. Unfortunately it appears to have been lost in translation. -- MIT Technology Review.

Gazelle paying up to $350 cash for old iPhones if you act now; doesn't need them till Oct 10

Gazelle paying up to $350 cash for old iPhones if you act now; doesn't need them till Oct 10

If you're looking to mitigate the cost of upgrading to Apple's 'iPhone 6' by getting the most cash possible for your current iPhone, buyback service Gazelle has just launched its most aggressive price-lock promotion yet: up to $350 for your old iPhone if you lock in a price quote today (and you don't need to send it in until Oct. 10 -- long after the iPhone 6 is expected on the market). -- AppleInsider.

How to enable Enhanced Dictation in OS X for streaming speech-to-text with live feedback

How to enable Enhanced Dictation in OS X for streaming speech-to-text with live feedback

OS X includes a nifty Dictation feature which allows you to control your Mac and apps with your voice. You can use "speakable items", basically a set of spoken commands, to open apps, choose menu items, email contacts and convert whole spoken sentences to text, wherever you can type text. -- iDownload Blog.

Monitor OS X network, CPU and disk activity in the Dock

Monitor OS X network, CPU and disk activity in the Dock

For those Mac users who love to push their hardware to its limits, the OS X Activity Monitor (found in Applications > Utilities) can be a handy tool. I often use it to find out if one process or another has suddenly decided to take over my iMac, to figure out if I'm redlining my network bandwidth, and to see if adding one more app while editing video is going to cause issues. This fun tip puts an updating icon into the Dock so you can keep an eye on one parameter while you're doing work. -- TUAW.

OS X Yosemite: Get to Know Notification Center's New Features

OS X Yosemite: Get to Know Notification Center's New Features

Apple's latest desktop operating system, OS X Yosemite, won't officially come out until sometime this fall. But now that its public beta is open, both developers and a large number of Mac owners are able to use a preview version of the landmark OS. -- Wired.

How to enable and disable notification badges on the Mac

How to enable and disable notification badges on the Mac

Badges are those app notifications that show you that something is waiting for you -- maybe a to-do list item is due, or maybe you have a new email. Sometimes badges can be helpful. Other times they can be really irritating. Here's how to activate them and deactivate them. -- iMore.

How To Monitor Your Network's Traffic In Real Time From Your Mac on the Cheap

How To Monitor Your Network's Traffic In Real Time From Your Mac on the Cheap

At one time or another, every Mac, iPhone, or iPad user is on a network. Got Wi-Fi at home or office? That's a network. Connected to the internet via a phone company or cable company? That's a network. How fast is your network? How much bandwidth does your network use? What can you do when the network your Mac is connected to begins to slow down? -- NoodleMac.

What It's Like Having Everything Done For You With An App

What It's Like Having Everything Done For You With An App

When I left New York for a three-month business trip to San Francisco, I exited my Upper East Side apartment at 5 a.m., held my hand out on 1st Avenue, and had a cab to Kennedy Airport within seconds. -- Business Insider.

Here's How To Identify Battery Draining Apps On iPhone

Here's How To Identify Battery Draining Apps On iPhone

Having a smartphone who's battery won't last a day is the kind of thing that drives most of us mad. If you're carrying around a large Android phone that's got a battery larger than most notebooks inside it, then you're probably fine but if you're using an iPhone, we're willing to bet that you're charging that bad boy at least once a day. Sometimes twice. -- Redmond Pie.

Which Apps Are Eating Your Battery? Normal Will Tell You

Which Apps Are Eating Your Battery? Normal Will Tell You

Somewhere, somehow, maybe less than a year after I got the latest version of my iPhone, its battery would mysteriously deplete in about half a day.

I wasn't really sure why. But now I can find out. -- TechCrunch.

The Novice's Complete Guide to Setting Up and Using an Apple TV - Part 2

The Novice's Complete Guide to Setting Up and Using an Apple TV - Part 2

In Part One of The Novice's Complete Guide to Setting Up and Using an Apple TV, I showed you how install, set up, and familiarise yourself with the basics of the Apple TV.

In this tutorial, I will show you how to:

  • Access each of the more unique channels
  • Hide channels that you aren't using
  • Set up Home Sharing
  • Access and change the important settings

Switching carriers? You may be able to take your iPhone 5S with you

Switching carriers? You may be able to take your iPhone 5S with you

"Will my Verizon iPhone 5S work on AT&T?" That's a question asked by one Ask Maggie reader confused by the puzzling state of device interoperability. This week's column tackles the issue. -- CNET.

10 Things You Didn't Know You Could Do With Your iPhone

10 Things You Didn't Know You Could Do With Your iPhone

The iPhone is the best smartphone you can buy right now. It's extremely user-friendly, and we'd be lost without it. While the iPhone is already chock-full of useful apps and games, it's also packed with a bunch of hidden features that can make life with your smartphone a whole lot easier.

Here are ten things you didn't know you could do with your iPhone.

  • Block People From calling or texting you
  • Have Siri read you emails
  • See which flights are above you
  • Make a passcode with a full keyboard
  • Turn CAPS LOCK on
  • Hold a key for extra options
  • Shake your iPhone to undo typing
  • Bold, italicize or underline words in emails
  • Check timestamps on your texts
  • Use your iPhone as a level

The Engineer of the Original Apple Mouse Talks About His Remarkable Career

The Engineer of the Original Apple Mouse Talks About His Remarkable Career

Jim Yurchenco was responsible for squeezing the guts inside the impossibly slim Palm V. He helped build the mouse for the Apple Lisa, which was significant in that it was the first mouse ever used by regular people. He was the first full-time employee at the company that would become Ideo, the massively influential design firm. But before all that, he was a sculptor. -- Wired.