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April 17 Thursday's News

 

TI brings Apple's iBeacon to Bluetooth products for industrial, automotive & embedded applications

TI brings Apple's iBeacon to Bluetooth products for industrial, automotive & embedded applications

Silicon firm Texas Instruments on Wednesday announced plans to support Apple's iBeacon micro-location technology across a large swath of TI's Bluetooth product line, including chips for embedded and automotive applications. -- AppleInsider.

LaCie reveals year-long security breach at online store

LaCie reveals year-long security breach at online store

Storage vendor LaCie , maker of a number of accessories compatible with Apple's Thunderbolt, announced on Wednesday that data from transactions made through the company's first-party online store may have been compromised as a result of a security breach that went undiscovered for nearly a year. -- AppleInsider.

33 great tips and tricks for iOS 7

33 great tips and tricks for iOS 7

Whether it's the first time you've picked up an iPad or the seventeenth time you've pulled out your iPhone today, there are probably still some iOS 7 features and functionality that you're not familiar with. Don't sweat it: We're here to help. We've collected some of our favorite and most useful tips and compiled them here, just for you. -- Macworld.

Which iPad Manual Rules The Roost?

Which iPad Manual Rules The Roost?

In Apple's drive toward simplicity, one of the things which fell into the category of "things we can do without" were physical paper manuals.

While the Cupertino company does offer a 140-page online User Guide -- which provides a passable intro to using your iPad (and currently has the advantage of being one of the few iOS 7.1 guides around) -- Apple's refusal to create manuals has fostered a cottage industry with rival products.

With the iPad recently celebrating its four-year birthday, Cult of Mac figured the time was right to dive into a few of the world of third-party "how to" guides to find out which -- if any -- deserve a place on your physical bookshelf (people still have those, right?) here in 2014. -- Cult of Mac.

How To Get Media Into iTunes Faster

How To Get Media Into iTunes Faster

I'm all for getting my stuff into iTunes more efficiently, aren't you? Jordan Merrick is, too, and he's come up with a brilliant way to do just that. He's also got a great site full of clever tips there as well. Really, go check it out.

Use Maps to See Traffic and Alerts

Use Maps to See Traffic and Alerts

With OS X 10.9 Mavericks, we can use the fancy new Maps program to plan our routes around construction slowdowns, accidents, and all sorts of other traffic problems. To see how this works, open Maps, and first, you'll make sure that "Show Traffic" is on by clicking the button with the little cars on the toolbar. -- The Mac Observer.

Change your contextual internet search

Change your contextual internet search

When you right-click a word in programs like Safari or in word processors, in addition to options for copying and pasting, or perhaps changing the style of the word, there might be a couple of options for looking the word up. The first of these is a quick-access link for the word's definition in the Dictionary, and the second is to search Google for the word, which will launch Safari and perform a standard Google search for it.

While Google is the default search option used here, you can use alternative search engines as well, including Bing and Yahoo. -- MacIssues.

Q&A: MacIssues Answers

Q&A: MacIssues Answers

MacIssues Answers is a periodic column where I respond to questions asked by MacIssues readers. In this session, readers asked about styling text in Calendar entries, how to best switch from Thunderbird to Mail, and how to remove unused and cluttering apps that were purchased and are now sitting in iCloud.

The Best Photo Organizing App? I'm Still Looking

The Best Photo Organizing App? I'm Still Looking

I have about 2,500 photos stored on my smartphone, and who knows how many more on previous phones and other devices I use. I need an organizing principle, stat.

Luckily, there are many apps that let you organize, categorize and view your photos on a mobile device with varying degrees of difficulty.

A new entrant from Dropbox, Carousel, looked promising, but fell short. A raft of others all have strengths, but nothing offers everything you want. -- New York Times.

Two new Biometric Patents from Apple Surface Covering Anti-Spoofing Measures and More

Two new Biometric Patents from Apple Surface Covering Anti-Spoofing Measures and More

On April 17, 2014, the US Patent & Trademark Office published two new biometric related patent applications from Apple. While one invention delves into various methods that Apple's Touch ID may be using today or could be using in the future, the other introduces us to a new and unique anti-spoofing measure that they aptly call the "Doodle" mode that could be used with the iPhone and/or future Macs. -- Patently Apple.

How Apple Can Improve iOS for Educators

How Apple Can Improve iOS for Educators

Bradley Chambers, Director of IT for the Brainerd Baptist School in Chattanooga, TN, has a number of suggestions for ways Apple could improve the role of iOS in education, including a way to deploy in-app purchases in MDM or Apple Configurator, the option to redistribute iBookstore textbooks between classes, increasing the default storage space in future devices, and an iCloud email option for schools.

Mac Remote Desktop Software Roundup

Mac Remote Desktop Software Roundup

Never has there been a time in history when so many people have had such widespread access to so many computers. Most of us have computers at home and work, and one in every five people now also owns a smartphone. And the number of devices we have access to is increasing as technology becomes ever more pervasive. That's why it's important to understand the one category of software that gives us access to our Macs even when we're not physically near them: remote desktop. -- TidBITS.

An Introduction to Bluetooth, Mac and iPhone

An Introduction to Bluetooth, Mac and iPhone

Bluetooth has been around since before the days of feature phones, having been developed in the 1990s, and it has come a long way from just being used in oversized handsfree earpieces.

If you want to wirelessly connect your iPhone to your Mac, Bluetooth is one of the easiest ways to do it. As long as you leave Bluetooth enabled on both your devices, they'll automatically connect whenever they're in range of each other.

In this tutorial, I'll explain what Bluetooth is, how to use it and show you a few practical uses of Bluetooth to wirelessly connect a Mac and an iPhone. -- Tuts+.

Make your Mac safer online: Five tips for better password security

Make your Mac safer online: Five tips for better password security

Gotofail. Heartbleed. Target. Sony's PlayStation Network. The NSA. It seems like every few weeks, there's a new story circulating in the news about major security breach concerning systems that you rely on. What can you do to protect yourself?

The bottom line is that attacks do happen, so it's best to try to minimize the risk you face when these services inevitably are breached. Here are some tips to help you stay as safe as possible by changing your password habits. -- iMore.

Python, Chemistry and a Mac 1

Python, Chemistry and a Mac 1

Python is rapidly becoming the scripting language of choice for scientists, and whilst SciPy and NumPy are probably the best known scientific tools for Python there are actually a huge number of Scientific Python Resources available. One that is useful for data analysis is pandas, an open source, BSD-licensed library providing high-performance, easy-to-use data structures and data analysis tools for the Python programming language. -- Macs in Chemistry.

Skip the Back Button: A Secret Swipe for Navigating Safari in iOS 7

Skip the Back Button: A Secret Swipe for Navigating Safari in iOS 7

There's an annoying quirk about Safari, Apple's browser, in iOS 7. If you've scrolled down a page, the bar that houses the back button disappears. Granted, this makes the reading experience more pleasurable, but if you want to go back a page, you need to either swipe up or tap the page to summon the bar back into existence. Turns out, there's a smart, yet little known workaround for this.

In Safari, when you want to go back a page, just swipe from the left edge of the screen instead of hitting that back button. And if you change your mind and want to go forward a page, swipe inwards from the right side of the screen. This trick also works in Messages and in the Settings app, along with a handful of third party apps, like Instagram and Strava, and Apple-built apps.

If you really like tapping that back button, or you need to access your bookmarks or tabs, you can alternatively just tap near the bottom of the screen to pull up the nav bar again. Be careful though -- lots of websites position ads at the bottom of their pages, so look before you tap. -- Wired.

Apple Does Not Know What To Do About Its Own Frankenstein-like Monster

Apple Does Not Know What To Do About Its Own Frankenstein-like Monster

Every now and then an entity becomes so big, so powerful, and so unwieldy that the creator just does not know what to do about the creation.

Think Frankenstein monster and you'll understand the daunting situation that faces Apple. There were once calls to break up Microsoft, break up IBM, even break up the N.Y. Yankees. Apple has its own Frankenstein monster problem and it does not know what to do. -- Mac360.

College kids gave Siri new powers and now you can too

College kids gave Siri new powers and now you can too

We already know Apple is working on improving Siri, but gosh dangit, the folks in Cupertino just aren't moving as fast as some would like. That's why a quartet of freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania decided to try making Siri do more on their own... at a hackathon, no less. They wound up taking third prize for the hack -- called GoogolPlex -- and after some fine-tuning, Alex Sands, Ajay Patel, Ben Hsu and Gagan Gupta are ready to help you make your virtual assistant do more. The setup process is trivial: you just have to change your Wi-Fi connection's proxy settings (seriously, it'll take five seconds). Once that's done though, you can invoke Siri and ask GoogolPlex to play tunes in Spotify, crank up the heat on your Nest thermostat or even start your Tesla. -- Engadget.

Switching From Sitting To Standing At Your Desk

Switching From Sitting To Standing At Your Desk

Chris Bowlby reports at BBC that medical research has been building up for a while now, suggesting constant sitting is harming our health -- potentially causing cardiovascular problems or vulnerability to diabetes.

Advocates of sit-stand desks say more standing would benefit not only health, but also workers' energy and creativity.

Some big organizations and companies are beginning to look seriously at reducing 'prolonged sitting' among office workers. 'It's becoming more well known that long periods of sedentary behavior has an adverse effect on health,' says GE engineer Jonathan McGregor, 'so we're looking at bringing in standing desks.'

The whole concept of sitting as the norm in workplaces is a recent innovation, points out Jeremy Myerson, professor of design at the Royal College of Art. 'If you look at the late 19th Century,' he says, Victorian clerks could stand at their desks and 'moved around a lot more'. 'It's possible to look back at the industrial office of the past 100 years or so as some kind of weird aberration in a 1,000-year continuum of work where we've always moved around.'

What changed things in the 20th Century was 'Taylorism' -- time and motion studies applied to office work. 'It's much easier to supervise and control people when they're sitting down,' says Myerson.

What might finally change things is if the evidence becomes overwhelming, the health costs rise, and stopping employees from sitting too much becomes part of an employer's legal duty of care 'If what we are creating are environments where people are not going to be terribly healthy and are suffering from diseases like cardiovascular disease and diabetes,' says Prof Alexi Marmot, a specialist on workplace design, 'it's highly unlikely the organization benefits in any way.'

Siri: Why are you asking me?

April 16 Wednesday's News

 

Microsoft launches $70/year Office 365 Personal for Mac, iPad

Microsoft launches $70/year Office 365 Personal for Mac, iPad

Pricing on Microsoft's Office 365 service became a little more affordable for individual users on Tuesday, as the company launched a new "Personal" subscription plan priced at $69.99 per year.

Apple joins tech heavyweights, wireless carriers in smartphone anti-theft initiative

Apple joins tech heavyweights, wireless carriers in smartphone anti-theft initiative

A group of smartphone industry giants, including Apple, Samsung, Google and Microsoft, signed on to a voluntary program spearheaded by the U.S. wireless industry that looks to incorporate anti-theft technology into handsets by July 2015. -- AppleInsider.

Apple issues OS X 10.9.3 Mavericks beta to developers with minor changes

Apple issues OS X 10.9.3 Mavericks beta to developers with minor changes

The latest version of Apple's upcoming OS X maintenance update, dubbed build 13D43, comes six days after the previous seed was issued and once again asks developers to concentrate on the same focus areas as prior versions.

According to the accompanying seed notes, Apple is looking for feedback on Graphics Drivers, Audio, Mail, Safari and iTunes contacts and calendar synchronization. -- AppleInsider.

Linksys WRT1900AC Wi-Fi router review: Faster than anything we've tested

Linksys WRT1900AC Wi-Fi router review: Faster than anything we've tested

It's expensive and its firmware is a few features short of the competition's, but the Linksys WRT1900AC is the fastest 802.11ac router you can buy today (today being April 16, 2014). -- PC World.

When iPhoto isn't enough: Four reasons to upgrade your software

When iPhoto isn't enough: Four reasons to upgrade your software

iPhoto is an excellent tool for basic photo management and editing, but if your library's getting too big to handle or you need advanced editing options, it might be time to look into alternatives. Adobe's Lightroom and Apple's Aperture provide better management and image tools, while Photoshop and Photoshop Elements can augment iPhoto's basic editing software with more powerful options. If you're starting to feel like your library is getting out of control, here are some of the best reasons to upgrade. -- Macworld.

How To Let Some Calls Get Past Do Not Disturb

How To Let Some Calls Get Past Do Not Disturb

We've been using the Do Not Disturb function on our iPhones since iOS 6, really, as the feature really helps us have some down time. You can schedule or enable the feature for easy access, keeping those pesky calls, messages, and notifications off your iPhone screen when you just don't have the brain space to deal.

But what about those calls and messages you really do need to get? What do you do there? Luckily, there are a couple of options to let certain calls come through. -- Cult of Mac.

Screens 3 For Mac Is The Best VNC App For Most People

Screens 3 For Mac Is The Best VNC App For Most People

Edovia makes the most polished VNC client for iOS, but its Mac app has been needing some attention for quite some time, especially in the design department. Screens 3 for Mac was released today, and it has been rebuilt from the group up for Mountain Lion. It also looks much cleaner and promises to be faster. -- Cult of Mac.

Big Data is the new Artificial Intelligence

Big Data is the new Artificial Intelligence

This is the first of a couple columns about a growing trend in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and how it is likely to be integrated in our culture. Computerworld ran an interesting overview article on the subject yesterday that got me thinking not only about where this technology is going but how it is likely to affect us not just as a people. but as individuals. How is AI likely to affect me? The answer is scary. -- I, Cringely.

Time Machine Bug In Mavericks with Secondary Monitor - How to Fix It

Time Machine Bug In Mavericks with Secondary Monitor - How to Fix It

There's a known issue in Mavericks where a secondary monitor causes Time Machine all manner of grief and heartache. If this is happening to you, we have some suggested workarounds to help you access your backups. -- The Mac Observer.

How to quickly look up words in OS X

How to quickly look up words in OS X

When browsing the Web, reading documents in programs TextEdit or Pages, you might come across a word or two that you do not know, or perhaps you are composing a document and need to look up synonyms. While there are online options such as Dictionary.com and its sister site Thesaurus.com which offer great word research tools, Apple includes a couple of quick ways to look up a word in OS X. -- MacIssues.

Fast Home Wireless: A Content Weapon?

Fast Home Wireless: A Content Weapon?

Consumers will ultimately choose the winners in the competition among cable companies, television networks, tech giants and others to supply our digital entertainment. We may do it, however, in a way we don't expect: by the speed of our home networks. -- New York Times.

Apple Granted 37 Patents Today Covering Two Major iDevice Technologies, Five Designs and More

Apple Granted 37 Patents Today Covering Two Major iDevice Technologies, Five Designs and More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 37 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover two major iDevice technologies and five design patents. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Laws and Ethics Can't Keep Pace with Technology

Laws and Ethics Can't Keep Pace with Technology

Employers can get into legal trouble if they ask interviewees about their religion, sexual preference, or political affiliation. Yet they can use social media to filter out job applicants based on their beliefs, looks, and habits. Laws forbid lenders from discriminating on the basis of race, gender, and sexuality. Yet they can refuse to give a loan to people whose Facebook friends have bad payment histories, if their work histories on LinkedIn don't match their bios on Facebook, or if a computer algorithm judges them to be socially undesirable. -- MIT Technology Review.

iMovie (2013): Tips For iMovie '11 Users

iMovie (2013): Tips For iMovie '11 Users

iMovie (2013) introduced an all-new, streamlined design. If you used a previous version of iMovie, you'll find that some features work differently or have moved to a different part of the app. Learn about these changes with the topics below. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

How to clean out old Mail downloads and reclaim disk space on your Mac

How to clean out old Mail downloads and reclaim disk space on your Mac

If you're running low on disk space on your Mac, especially SSD space, every extra bit can count. One of the places you can often scrape out a few extra megabytes or even gigabytes is Mail Downloads. Any attachments you open in Mail or Quick Look gets saved right to that folder. Chances are you don't need them, especially the old ones, and trashing them will free up some valuable space. -- iMore.

Using the Timeline Index in Final Cut Pro X

Using the Timeline Index in Final Cut Pro X

There are many Final Cut Pro X editors out there who have never even opened up the Timeline Index. Steve Martin And Mark Spencer take a look at what it is and what exactly it does. -- fcp.co.

How to display your Calendar events as list view in iOS 7.1 Notification Center

How to display your Calendar events as list view in iOS 7.1 Notification Center

If you switch your Calendar app to daily agenda, your Today section in the iOS Notification Center adapts its layout accordingly to display your daily agenda as a list. -- iDownload Blog.

3 Professional iPhone Camera Features that You Probably Don't Know About

3 Professional iPhone Camera Features that You Probably Don't Know About

The camera in the iPhone 5 as well as the updated version in the iPhone 5S both have some pretty great features that take the iPhone's camera from a simple smartphone camera into a device that rivals today's point-and-shoot models.

This doesn't mean your iPhone 5S is going to replace your DSLR any time soon, but by using these iPhone camera features, you can get the most out of the camera that's always in your pocket. -- Apple Gazette.

This is Your Brain On Mobile

This is Your Brain On Mobile

Jeremy Vandehey offers this "critique of destructive smartphone habits diagnosed by someone that makes a living off of them."

I made a promise to myself and my friends to live a more fulfilling life. I let a 2.3 x 4.5 inch piece of glass, metal, and plastic get in the way of that. I made a few small changes that compounded into a better prescription than any anxiety medication. I started rehabbing slowly by rethinking how, why, and when I used my phone. I became very meticulous about when I could and could not use my phone. I went as far as making it inconvenient to use apps I didn't actually NEED.

April 15 Tuesday's News

 

Microsoft reverse engineers Apple's Passbook, adds support in Windows Phone 8.1

Microsoft reverse engineers Apple's Passbook, adds support in Windows Phone 8.1

With Apple's Passbook quickly becoming the de facto way for developers to create digital tickets, store cards and passes, Microsoft has found a way to strip the data from .pkpass files and recompile them on handsets running Windows Phone 8.1. -- AppleInsider.

MacBook Pro vs. MacBook Air: how I made the choice

MacBook Pro vs. MacBook Air: how I made the choice

Lately, I've been struggling with what's clearly a first-world problem: I have too many computers.

There was my main iMac, which I love. Then there was my "power" laptop, a mid-2010 15-inch MacBook Pro (with the 1680-by-1050 display and a recently installed 750GB SSD), which I love. And there was my "light" laptop, a mid-2012 11-inch MacBook Air, which I love (and which replaced an older 11-inch Air). So what was the problem?

The problem was that I don't travel often enough to justify owning two laptops. And even if I did, I'd still be stuck answering the "Which one should I take on this trip?" question. Generally, I take the big heavy MacBook Pro beast when I need the extra screen-space and the more powerful (or so I thought) CPU; when I don't need those two things, I take the Air. And then I also have to deal with the issue of which machine has the files I need for each trip. In short, it was a horrid setup, and it needed fixing. -- Macworld.

Still Think You Can't Do Real Work On The iPad? A Lot Has Changed Since 2010

Still Think You Can't Do Real Work On The iPad? A Lot Has Changed Since 2010

Back when I worked exclusively on my iPad, writing posts for Cult of Mac and everything related to that, I had a hell of a time getting some things done. It seemed like every tiny step needed to be researched before I could get anything done. -- Cult of Mac.

3 More Tips for Protecting Yourself from Heartbleed

3 More Tips for Protecting Yourself from Heartbleed

When news of the heartbleed OpenSSL flaw hit the Web last week, it send the online security community into a tizzy, and rightly so. The Mac Observer shared some tips on what you can do to protect yourself, and now we have some more help keep your private stuff out of the hands of the bad guys. -- The Mac Observer.

How to restore files from Time Machine manually

How to restore files from Time Machine manually

Apple's included Time Machine backup technology in OS X is a convenient and rather thorough way to make full-system backups of your Mac. It works by using multi-linked files on the backup drive to mirror unchanged data from a prior backup instance to a new one so both instances share the same data on disk. It then only copies changed data since the last backup, to the new backup instance. This approach allows Time Machine to create many snapshots of the entire system without any data redundancy on disk.

Whether it uses a disk image on a Time Capsule, or an external drive, Time Machine uses the raw HFS+ (Mac OS Extended) filesystem as a storage medium, which means that in addition to the Time Machine interface, you can use other means to access the Time Machine backup data. -- MacIssues.

Microsoft Releases Office for Mac 2011 14.4.1 Update

Microsoft Releases Office for Mac 2011 14.4.1 Update

This week, Microsoft released an update for Office for Mac 2011, resolving vulnerabilities in Microsoft Office that could allow remote code execution if a specifically crafted file is opened in an affected version of Microsoft Office. The 113.5 MB update is available for Mac OS X version 10.5.8 or later versions on an Intel processor.

This update applies to the following Microsoft software: Office 2011, Office 2011 Home and Business Edition, Word 2011, Excel 2011, PowerPoint 2011, Outlook 2011, Office for Mac Standard 2011 Edition, Microsoft Office for Mac Home & Student 2011, and Microsoft Office for Mac Academic 2011. -- Microsoft.

How to search smarter in Mail

How to search smarter in Mail

OS X's Spotlight search feature automatically indexes all the messages in Apple Mail for super-fast searching, and you can search for those messages either within Mail or using the system-wide Spotlight menu.

But Mail isn't limited to simple text searches. With a flexible system of search tokens (which I explain in a moment), Boolean searches, and other options, you can find almost any message you can describe. You can even save a search by converting it into a smart mailbox, as I describe at the end of this article. -- Macworld.

Scheduling success: Four tech tricks for planning meetings

Scheduling success: Four tech tricks for planning meetings

Let's face it: Despite all the technology at our fingertips, scheduling and planning meetings is still a pain in the neck. Nobody can agree on where to meet or when. When meetings do get scheduled, people forget or show up unprepared. You'd think we could do better.

Using your Mac, iPhone and the Web, of course, you can, but you have to use them right. Here are four tricks I've learned that use technology to plan meetings better. -- Macworld.

Using Autofill In Numbers

Using Autofill In Numbers

Numbers can automatically fill in cells for you if you want to repeat a value, or create a sequence. You can use Autofill to add a set of sequential numbers or dates to cells. You can also have the cells follow a pattern. If you are using tables properly, formulas included in cells will repeat as you add new rows to the table. -- MacMost.

iTunes High Resolution Conversion to WAV or AIFF Truncates Bit Depth

iTunes High Resolution Conversion to WAV or AIFF Truncates Bit Depth

I spotted something surprising today, and if you buy and listen to high-resolution files with iTunes, you'll want to know about this. Personally, I don't believe the high-resolution music file stuff, but it's up to you.

As you may know, you can play back high-resolution files in iTunes, if they are in Apple Lossless format. You can convert files to Apple Lossless from FLAC, AIFF or WAV with no loss in quality. You can do the WAV or AIFF conversion in iTunes, or, to convert FLAC files, you can use the free XLD.

But, if you use iTunes to later convert your Apple Lossless files to WAV or AIFF, you may be surprised: iTunes converts your 24-bit files to only 16 bits. Here's an example: I took a 24-bit, 96 kHz file and converted it to WAV using iTunes. -- Kirkville.

Why Is It So Hard to Think Different?

Why Is It So Hard to Think Different?

The Think Different formula: Look at the target market; figure out what customers want or will want; build a product that encompasses that; and bet the farm on the result. That may look easy, but it's scary risky, which is why there are so few CEOs like Jobs, Bezos or Musk. Most others are like the runners who just stare at the leader's butt and then wonder why they never win the race. -- TechNewsWorld.

April 14 Monday's News

 

Connecting two Macs using Thunderbolt

Connecting two Macs using Thunderbolt

I think all Mac users can agree: Thunderbolt is both fast and flexible. Not only is it capable of 10 Gbps of bi-directional throughput on each of the dual channels in its original form and 20 Gbps max on a combined channel in Thunderbolt 2, it can also transport PCIe, USB 3.0, FireWire, Mini DisplayPort and gigabit ethernet data. But that's not all: you can also daisy-chain up to six Thunderbolt devices per Thunderbolt port on your Mac. With six available Thunderbolt 2 ports on the new Mac Pro, that adds up to a plethora of possible peripherals. -- Macworld.

How to Easily Create a Travel Itinerary Map in OS X

How to Easily Create a Travel Itinerary Map in OS X

Have you ever wanted to create your own custom travel itinerary map? It turns out it's pretty easy, and it's built into every Mac.

iPhoto can automatically create beautiful maps showing all or part of a travel itinerary - precisely laying out your travel route from country to country and city to city. The trip destinations are accurately plotted, and a number of map styles can be selected. -- The Mac Observer.

How to remove application preferences on your Mac

How to remove application preferences on your Mac

Most programs and services you run in OS X will save preferences to disk as a property list (.plist) file in your account's hidden Library > Preferences folder. Since these files contain settings that are loaded and interacted with as the program is run, if a fault exists either in a specific setting or in the structure of the file itself, then a program may experience hangs, crashes, the inability to save and retrieve settings, or other odd behaviors. -- MacIssues.

How to fix home folder permissions in OS X

How to fix home folder permissions in OS X

If you run into odd slow-downs or problems with loading specific programs and services, then sometimes this can be caused by the inability of the program or service to access a necessary resource on disk, be it a preference file, or a core resource like a framework, font, or audio unit. In these cases you might see an error, but also might just see the problematic behavior. -- MacIssues.

Isolate issues using a new user account

Isolate issues using a new user account

When troubleshooting problems with your Mac, it is a good idea to try to isolate it as much as possible. Even if you cannot pinpoint the problem, finding out where and when it crops up can help if you need to seek guidance from others.

One of the steps in doing this is to see if the problem you are experiencing is an account-based issue, or one that is perhaps more global in nature. -- MacIssues.

When and how to reset your Mac's SMC

When and how to reset your Mac's SMC

The System Management Controller, or SMC, is a controller in your Mac that is responsible for handling a number of power- and controls-related features of your computer. In general, the lights, buttons, charging, fans, and optional display modes are all examples of items that rely on the SMC for proper behavior. -- MacIssues.

Test related settings when troubleshooting

Test related settings when troubleshooting

Sometimes we get fixated on specific settings and possibilities when troubleshooting problems with our Macs, and in doing so might overlook other seemingly unrelated settings that might end up being the root of the problem at hand. -- MacIssues.

Understanding and adjusting default permissions in OS X

Understanding and adjusting default permissions in OS X

Every file and folder in OS X has permissions associated with it, which allow the system to grant or deny access to specific users and groups. You can see these permissions by getting information on a selected file or folder in the Finder, and then expanding the "Sharing & Permissions" section at the bottom of the window. -- MacIssues.

Apple Patent Reveals Larger Apple TV Heat Sink Right for Gaming

Apple Patent Reveals Larger Apple TV Heat Sink Right for Gaming

Earlier today Patently Apple discovered a patent application filing that listed one of Apple's leading product design engineers. The patent application was published under its inventor's names as a means of avoiding being published under Apple's name at the US Patent Office. Legally speaking, Apple only has to appear as the assignee after the patent application has been granted. This is a somewhat common practice that Apple uses to keep specific intellectual property out of the lime light until the last possible moment. The discovery today covers a rather simple invention. It's about providing Apple TV with a much larger heat sink. Today's Apple TV supports a 32-bit single-core A5 processor. But if Apple should ever decide to adopt their faster A7 or future A8 64-bit single or multi-core processors to support gaming, it would need a larger heat sink. In context, last Wednesday iFixit uncovered a larger heat sink in Amazon's new Fire TV that's aiming at Android gaming. The trend is obvious. -- Patently Apple.

Apple updates standalone FaceTime app for Snow Leopard users with connection bug fix

Apple updates standalone FaceTime app for Snow Leopard users with connection bug fix

Remember the good ol' days when FaceTime wasn't included with each Mac? Back then, you had to download a bit of software from the Mac App Store in order to make video calls to iPhone owners (though iChat could still do Mac-to-Mac calls). Even today, that standalone app is still available on the Mac App Store for $.99--and for some reason it's still the #5 paid app on the entire store.

Given its apparent popularity three years after its launch, it makes at least a little sense that Apple updated the app today to fix a bug that could prevent users from connecting to FaceTime calls. Of course, if you're on anything newer than Snow Leopard, you don't need this update, but anyone still running OS X 10.6 who already purchased the app can get the free update to resolve the problem.

For Snow Leopard users who haven't already made the purchase, the app is $.99 on the Mac App Store.

Scheduling success: Four tech tricks for planning meetings

Scheduling success: Four tech tricks for planning meetings

Let's face it: Despite all the technology at our fingertips, scheduling and planning meetings is still a pain in the neck. Nobody can agree on where to meet or when. When meetings do get scheduled, people forget or show up unprepared. You'd think we could do better.

Using your Mac, iPhone and the Web, of course, you can, but you have to use them right. Here are four tricks I've learned that use technology to plan meetings better. -- Macworld.

How to replace the battery in your iPhone 5

How to replace the battery in your iPhone 5

The iPhone 5 has been selling for over a year-and-a-half now and that means battery life just won't be what it used to be for anyone who has owned one for any length of time. That's just how batteries and charge cycles work. If you're starting to experience greatly reduced battery life on your iPhone 5, are no longer under AppleCare, but aren't ready to upgrade yet, you can always try a DIY repair. Not only it it easy but it's a whole lot more affordable than a new iPhone. Follow along and we'll walk you through from start to finish! -- iMore.